Arches National Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn

Best Rated Warnings and Dangers in Arches National Park

  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Stay on the trails!

    by sim1 Updated Feb 26, 2005

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    When you visit Arches National Park they do ask one thing from you, and that is if you would please stay on the trails. What may seem like a tiny detour from the trail, may be a serious damage to the fragile environment of the park.

    Much of the area here is covered by 'cryptobiotic soil crust'. This crust is easily damaged by walking over it, especially when it is dry and brittle. Damaging this crust will cause erosion. It will take years and years for these areas recover, and sadly sometimes they never will. So keep Arches National Park beautiful as it is, and stay on the trails :-)

    Delicate Arch at sunset
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  • RoscoeGregg's Profile Photo

    Delecate Arch: Don't Expect to Be Alone

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Aug 26, 2013

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    THIS IS NOT TO DISCOURAGE YOU!!

    I just think that it is nice to know that when you hike to Delicate Arch there will be other people there when you arrive. Some times a lot of people. This is especially true if you are there at sunset.

    This is not totally a bad thing as they are some times fun to watch.

    I highly recommend this hike. Just a heads up.

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    • Backpacking
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  • lazyman_1's Profile Photo

    Be careful hiking to delicate arch

    by lazyman_1 Written May 31, 2006

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    The very last leg of the delicate arch hike cuts a trail around the rock on your way up. One side is a sheer rock wall but the other side is completely open. Be careful if you've brought little ones along with you or when passing another person who's going the opposite way.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Don't Hang About Too Long Under The Arches!

    by johngayton Written Jun 27, 2006

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    In 1991 Landscape Arch lost a huge chunk of its underside and is now a bit more fragile than it was previously. By all accounts there was a group of peole around at the time but on hearing a cracking sound decided it might be a good idea to move away from the Arch. This doesn't mean that the Arches and other rock formations are really that fragile but they are undergoing constant change and you never know.

    I reckon that chunk in the middle is next!
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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Flash Floods

    by mrclay2000 Written Dec 23, 2002

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    Park signs warn of flash floods that arise so suddenly in the desert. Though such fatalities are more common to the other parks in southern Utah, the topography at Arches provides the same conditions where flash floods can be a serious problem. Light showers and even the briefest of sprinkles can set off a mudslide depending on where you are.

    Delicate Arch

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    Do not go from the trail to...

    by Pavlik_NL Written Oct 15, 2002

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    Do not go from the trail to far or try to find a new way through the labyrinth of The Finns. This maze is so big and confusing that you very easily get lost or get trapped in a dead end. There have been people lost before and found by the rangers too late!

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  • Ischyros's Profile Photo

    Heat Stroke and Dehydration

    by Ischyros Written Oct 16, 2002

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    The biggest dangers here are heat stroke and dehydration. Many people fail to realize that this is a desert region with little rainfall. The only steady source of water in Arches is the Colorado River along the southern boundry, but it's not fit to drink. Take plenty of drinking water and don't overexert yourself. There is very little shade here too.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Soil is Alive!

    by AKtravelers Written Jun 10, 2006

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    Please be careful and don't stray off the hiking trails and walk on the soil. The soil is the home of fragile microorganisms that make the ecosystem function. A misplaced footstep can kill them and effect the environment for decades -- things gro slowly in the desert (even bacteria).

    An Indian Paintbrush enjoys its neighbor bacteria
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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Threat of Dehydration Is Real

    by AKtravelers Written Jun 10, 2006

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    Arches is a desert environment so make sure you carry enough water for your plans. This should be a liter per person per half day (at least) if you are hiking. Even if you are seeing the park by car, be sure to drink enough water as you will be making short walks to many sights. And don't forget the pets! If you've brought your dog along for the ride, they'll be hot too (and we're sure we don't need to warn anyone about the foolishness of leaving their dog inthe car, right?)

    Delicate Arch sits above the hot, dry desert rock
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  • Callavetta's Profile Photo

    Stay hydrated

    by Callavetta Written May 22, 2006

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    Arches National Park is high and dry. At between 4 and 5 thousand feet in elevation, there may be a bit of an adjustment to make for visitors from sea level. It can also be very hot and being so dry it's easy to get dehydrated. Carry water with you at all times when hiking or walking on the paths.

    Hot and Dry

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  • Easty's Profile Photo

    Winding Mountain Road

    by Easty Written Jun 15, 2004

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    The road going into Arches National Park from US Route 191 is very steep and winding for the first 3 miles. The road has no guardrails either. The person who drives this part of the road should be experienced.

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  • lazyman_1's Profile Photo

    BRING WATER!!

    by lazyman_1 Written May 31, 2006

    It is very very important that you bring a few liters/gallons of water with you. Temperatures routinely soar above 100 degrees meaning you will become dehydrated very very fast. I was able to locate 2 places to fill up my water bottles however both were at the far north end of the park. One at the start of the devils garden trail, the other at the campground entrance.
    Also be sure to bring sunscreen along as the Utah sun can really burn the unprepared

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Follow the trail markers

    by Etoile2B Updated Apr 4, 2011

    There are many hiking paths throughout Arches National Park that are maintained by the National Park Service. These trails are marked to blend in with the natural terrain. Be sure to stay on the clearly marked paths and follow the trail markers. If you’re planning to hike “off the beaten path” and are unfamiliar with the terrain check in first at the visitors center located near the park entrance. Here you have access to park maps and trail guides. Experienced hikers lead guided hikes through some of the more difficult terrain at various times during the day. It is easy to get lost if you are unfamiliar with the territory and stray from the marked paths. And the sun in this area can be unforgiving with very little shade available. When in doubt search for the trail markers and be sure to bring plenty of potable water with you.

    The stacked rocks indicate a trail marker.
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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Desert Temperatures

    by Etoile2B Written Feb 9, 2005

    Be prepared for extremes of temperature when visiting Arches National Park. In the summertime the heat is extreme and the sun intense. In the winter temperatures drop and snow falls. During the summer you’ll be hard pressed to find shade in this part of the desert. Arches National Park attracts all types of adventure seekers. Just make sure you drink plenty of water and carry maps with you when hiking, camping or climbing. If you’re unfamiliar with the terrain don’t stray from the marked trails or go with a guide. If you get lost and caught out in the desert sun there isn’t much you can do to protect yourself from exposure. Know your limits, carry proper equipment and provisions, have a plan and be careful. But most of all have fun. If you’re a thrill seeker looking for adventure Arches National Park is the place for you.

    Arches National Park
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  • LauraWest's Profile Photo

    funny story...

    by LauraWest Updated Sep 6, 2007

    I just thought of this again this morning as I was driving to work. I have no idea how these memories just pop into my head. Well, I got to thinking - did I ever write this up as a Tip, for Arches? so, the negative answer realized, here goes -- !!

    The Dangers of Pitching a Tent on Sand!

    We were camping at Arches National Park, getting a meal ready, after pitching our tent. At the small group site, near the camp site nearby, we heard and saw a group of teens setting up camp. They erected a very large nylon dome tent. They seemed to be having a good time, so far. Their adult chaperones were low key and jovial. Suddenly, screams and shouts. I look up from my Sterno flame, to see a large orange nylon ball rolling over the sand, FAST, with teens running after! Lesson: pitching a tent in sand can be tricky. The stakes are not that effective! Remember to put something(s) heavy inside the tent, to keep it from blowing away!!

    Chapter Two

    Reminds me of another story...I lent a small two person nylon pup tent to friends. They came back home, to report they lost the tent. How?! This is what I asked. Lesson (which seems obvious to me, even though I never had a boat!!): Don't pitch a tent on the deck of a boat. It will blow away!!!

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Desert

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Comments (1)

  • Apr 13, 2013 at 2:24 PM

    Warning for people with a tremendous fear of heights and falling: Arches is panic-stricken torture for people terrified of heights-or at least the ascent and descent into it is...

    This isn't a review to discourage people from going to Arches, but my experience led me to believe it isn't for everyone. Seriously; consider the needs of those with an irrational fear of heights and falling. I detail my experience below:

    For those of you who have never been to Arches before, please be advised that the ascent into the actual park is quite terrifying. Upon paying the park entrance fee at the little hut, you drive towards certain death everso slowly, winding back and forth up a sheer rock cliff face tens of stories high. In my opinion, the ascent was a horrible experience and no amount of money in the world could make me do it again. The road itself is extremely narrow and does not have guardrails. Please, if you are afraid of heights choose someone fearless yet sane to drive, and be prepared to be on total mental lockdown for a few minutes while you make it to the arches. I was so afraid I tell people I had my eyes closed times three: 1. my eyelids; 2. the Arches National Monument park map covering my eyes; and 3. my hand over the park map over my closed eyes. I was squatting down almost to the floorboards of the car seatbelted into my seat.

    I am deathly afraid of heights and have never been more afraid in my entire life than I was at Arches; I had an easier time on the Steel Eel at the Sea World in Texas than on this ascent.I have flown several times in my life (and would fly again), eaten at the Skies restaurant at the Hyatt in Kansas City a few times, and viewed Boston at the Prudential SkyWalk. In fact, dealing with the steep Rocky Mountain National Forest roads mentally for me in a rainshower was a piece of cake than compared to my experience at Arches. Also, I was so incredibly excited to see the Grand Canyon I even sat 5 feet from its edge for a photo opp, if that gives you any indication on how fear-instilling Arches really was for me...What I am trying to say is that I have been forced to deal with heights before, but this ascent caused me to react very negatively.

    I would suggest allowing plenty of daylight to enter and exit Arches; I could not imagine doing it at night (there were still hundreds of people there at sundown). I was so happy to reach solid, continuous ground that I vowed to never leave it again.

    For equally beautiful sightseeing (without the terrifying entrance or exit), I would suggest Canyonlands. If you have a 4wd vehicle you may take your vehicle on the trails. We left our 4wd adventure at Canyonlands to make it to Arches in time, and we soon regretted that decision.

    On another note, we weren't nearly as impressed with Arches as we were with Monument Valley. Monument Valley was a very easy, relaxed drive and the formations were incredible. That is my husband's most favorite place in the world now. :).

    • goodfish's Profile Photo
      Apr 16, 2013 at 3:55 AM

      Very sorry you had a negative experience at Arches but honestly, yours is only the 2nd complaint I've EVER heard about the drive in/out the park. My husband does not like heights at all and he's had NO problem either driving in or driving out - and we've done it probably 6 times both during daylight and after dark. We've done places in the west that were much, much worse than this one, trust me.

      So, just for the benefit other others wishing to visit the Arches, while it obviously bothered the previous poster, I've never, ever read the same from any of the other millions of visitors to this park so please don't let one review deter you. If you have any concerns, please post the question in the VT Arches forum for more input from our members.

      forum.virtualtourist.com/Arc...


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