Bryce Canyon National Park Things to Do

  • View From Paria Viewpoint
    View From Paria Viewpoint
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  • Paria Amphitheater
    Paria Amphitheater
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  • Sunset Point
    Sunset Point
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Most Recent Things to Do in Bryce Canyon National Park

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    Take a look at the Visitors Center

    by Segolily Written Sep 13, 2011

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    This is where you'll get the layout of the park, get all the up to date information on the trail conditions, get your questions about the geology, flowers and prairie dogs answered. It is here that you can get shuttle schedules, sign up for ranger led hikes, get the schedule for ranger talks and astronomy particulars. It is a must do stop.

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    Hike the Rim Trail

    by Segolily Written Sep 13, 2011

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    The 5.5 mile Rim trail goes from the Fairyland trailhead along the rim of the canyon to Bryce Point. If you start at Bryce Point you will be mostly downhill. The most common area to walk is the approximately 2 mile stretch from Sunrise to Inspiration Points. Every step along the way changes the angle and light on the hoodoos and they are magical.

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    Hike the Navajo to Queen's Garden Loop

    by Segolily Written Sep 13, 2011

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    The best way to see the park besides walking along the rim is to take a hike down into the midst of the hoodoos. My favorite hike down is the Wall Street section of Navajo loop. Sometimes it is closed due to rock fall. But if it is open it is a wonderful slot canyon section of the park where light can make the rocks glow, where trees can grow straight and tall.

    On the other second half of Navajo loop is a natural bridge reaching across the walls.

    To get to Queen's Garden you take the Under the rim trail through Ponderosa Pine and Utah Juniper.

    Then the side trip in to see the Queen sitting on her throne allows more time to speculate on other shapes and forms. Heading up the trail there are plenty of great places to stop and rest. A bridge or two to go under all the while marveling at the yellow and pink, orange and coral colors in the rock.

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    Look for Hoodoos

    by Segolily Written Sep 13, 2011

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    Hoodoos are fun. They are spires of rock standing up into the sky eroded away into fanciful, intriguing, whimsical, and unusual shapes. At Bryce you get a whole mountainful and they look in some cases like the Qin terrecotta soldiers, or the goblins from fairytales, or lions, or rabbits, or queen's sitting in their gardens.

    The largest area of hoodoos in Bryce is in the Main Amphitheater. This can be seen from the Sunrise, Sunset, Inspiration and Bryce Points. Inspiration has two viewpoints and it is definitely worth it to make the steep slog up to the higher one. It is aptly named, truly inspirational.

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    Hike the Navajo Trail

    by vichatherly Written Jul 1, 2011

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    This was to be our only hike down into the Bryce Canyon National Park, as we only had one time for a one night stop.

    The trail is rated as moderate hike and it was certainly okay for me, who sits behind a desk for the most part of the year. All you need to do is to remember to take with you plenty of water, some nuts, wear some decent hiking boots and realise that you will be walking down at the beginning and therefore will be climbing (I use climbing in its loosest term) back up at the end.

    The trail will give you a great insight into the wonders that the park has to offer. Plenty of arches, caves and beautiful hoodoos.

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    Stargazing

    by pacific_sol Updated Jun 14, 2011

    Because of the high elevation of the park and the fact that it's so far away from "civilization," there are some great stargazing opportunities in this area. The National Park Service offers some stargazing programs at the visitor's center and moonlit guided hikes but but we were lucky enough to be in the area on a cold moonless November night and just stargazed by ourselves. We drove about a mile away from Bryce Canyon City towards the park and parked our car a parking lot by the entrance to the park. We were the only ones out there. After shutting off all the lights from the car and giving our eyes about 10 minutes to adjust, it was amazing to see how many stars we could see. Living in the city, I have never seen so many stars! We definitely wanted to stay longer but it was 29 degrees outside and we were freezing. Plus it was so eerie to be in a place that was so quiet. There were no cars, no wind, no animals.....it was an experience in itself to be somewhere that was practically noiseless!

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    Navajo Trail

    by Toughluck Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    From Sunset Point, the Navajo Loop, now Navajo Trail, leads down into the main bowl of Bryce Canyon. It was once a loop, spliting just below the Sunset Point Overlook. Because of a rock fall in the October or November 2006, the loop is now closed. To see what you missed, check out my General Tip on 'Wall Street'

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    Hike below the Rim in winter

    by goingsolo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Silent City, which looks so imposing in the summer, is barely visible in the winter due to the thick blanket of snow that covers its walls. Unfortunately, the thick snow also covered the trail, making it difficult to follow. Add some winds and postholing to the journey and it made me rethink the whole hiking below the rim idea for this trip.

    Several people braved the conditions and headed down into Fairyland Canyon. A few did it on skis, which seemed like a good idea. With the right clothing and right gear, hiking below the rim is difficult but not impossible.

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    View of distant plateau in winter

    by goingsolo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The dramatic visual effects of Bryce in the winter are overwhelming. The difference in between the golden landscape of summer, lush in some areas and toasy brown in all respects and the still white winter scene six months later, many trees devoid of leaves and brown mixed with powder white snow, is simply amazing. I'd highly recommend visiting Bryce in both seasons, but if you have to choose only one, go with winter.

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    Hiking in Bryce National Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I absolutely Love these hoodoos! Rough hewed, pink and orange limestone pillars standing side-by-side and marching off into the distance. I really wanted to get down within them!!! Unfortunately we arrived during a time when they had had very little snowfall, but it started to snow soon after we arrived and continued all night and the next day. Because of this the trails were slippery and it was warned that hiking was a dangerous activity. Also, many of the trails had been closed, which you will find is common in the winter months. There are about 50 miles of trails in the park. These trails will take you down below the rim for a closer view of these colorful formations. Don’t forget that this park is at a high altitude, so take your time and adjust to it. Also, remember that these trails are steep, and your return trip will be uphill. Summer hiking can be very hot, be sure to carry plenty of drinking water and wear sturdy hiking boots any time you venture into the Hoodoos. If you own a hiking stick, you will find that it is very useful while hiking in Bryce Canyon National Park. You will be able to pick up maps and information about the various trails at the visitor center. The web page listed below is a wonderful resource that will allow you to chose the level and length of hiking trails you are interested in, then will give you information about the trails, their length, etc.

    Snow Covered Hoodoos in Bryce
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    HOODOO HERE, HOODOO THERE AND EVERYWHERE

    by travelgourmet Written Jun 21, 2010

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    Bryce Canyon National Park's number one, two, and third thing to do, is gaze upon the hundreds of "hoodoos", the white to pink to red stone pinnacles that rise from the floor of the canyon to the rim. These natural wind, rain, and time structured stone wonderment will amaze you. There are view turnouts to park your vehicle and walk around the rim or down trails to view these oddities of nature. Early morning or just before sunset is a great time to visit to see the shadow effects on the stone. Make sure you stop by the Visitors Center to get the canyon information.

    YOOHOO, WHERE ARE THE HOODOOS RIM VIEW OF THE HORSESHOE HOODOO AMPHITHEATER HOLE IN THE HOODOO HOODOOS FAIRYLAND HOODOO CITY
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    Rancher cabins

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 28, 2009

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    There still are ranchers around here, and they have open grazing rights. These are some of those cabins they stay in, or have in the past. The little one is a rebuilt cabin of Ebenezer Bryce, the founder of the area in 1875. He grazed cattle in Bryce park and had a darn hard time finding them at times.

    Ebenezer Bryce cabin CAbins in the filed Old cabins from early 1900's
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    Horseback Rides

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 28, 2009

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    The rides through Ruby's resort area are for 1 1/2 hours, 1/2 day and full day. They go into Bryce, or Escalante Grand Staircase. Ruby's wants you to call to get rates. They say they take you back to where the cowboys roamed, and outlaws hide out from getting caught.
    I did find rates on the site, and winter rates of Cot-April 1st are 1 hour is $45; 1/2 day (3 hours) is $75, and full day (5 hours). They take you to Red Canyon mostly.
    The sad part is when I was there, I wanted to let the horses loose out of the corral they were penned up in. There were about 25 horses, and you could tell from having to stand up and not able to walk or graze, they are "stir crazy" They also have to reside in their own excrement. It is a sad matter. Maybe some animal protection group should look into a better way to keep the horses sane; like Best Friends Animal Sanctuary?

    Horses in corral
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    Mossy Cave

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This is a part of the park that is outside the park and on Hwy 12. It is about 4 miles east from junction Hwy 163 going into the park, and between mile marker 17/18. The stop is well worth it. There is really a cave and a water pool and a cave. The hike is in two parts. The first gets you up to a bridge. Then next does a steep climb to the cave and water area. The hike is about 1 1/4 miles round trip. It is relatively easy, but some loose gravel and steep climbs are prominent. You cross foot bridges to the junction to the water falls.. One is a wide mossy overhang. The waer fall frop is 15 feet and a nice picture moment

    View of hoodoo's at mountain edge Water fall into the valley floor Falls from the creek above The cave is a mossy aea that has water dripping
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    The Bryce Lodge

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This was built in 1930's and has not changed a bit; well maybe upgrade of electrical and water and sewer system. Either way it is like going back in time to enjoy the quality and elegance of the old times. There is a restaurant inside and it serves all meals and packs lunches for trail hiking.

    View of the outside Inside of the lobby area Gift Shop for those tourists
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Bryce Canyon National Park Things to Do

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