Bryce Canyon National Park Things to Do

  • View From Paria Viewpoint
    View From Paria Viewpoint
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  • Paria Amphitheater
    Paria Amphitheater
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  • Sunset Point
    Sunset Point
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Most Recent Things to Do in Bryce Canyon National Park

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    Horseback Rides

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 28, 2009

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    The rides through Ruby's resort area are for 1 1/2 hours, 1/2 day and full day. They go into Bryce, or Escalante Grand Staircase. Ruby's wants you to call to get rates. They say they take you back to where the cowboys roamed, and outlaws hide out from getting caught.
    I did find rates on the site, and winter rates of Cot-April 1st are 1 hour is $45; 1/2 day (3 hours) is $75, and full day (5 hours). They take you to Red Canyon mostly.
    The sad part is when I was there, I wanted to let the horses loose out of the corral they were penned up in. There were about 25 horses, and you could tell from having to stand up and not able to walk or graze, they are "stir crazy" They also have to reside in their own excrement. It is a sad matter. Maybe some animal protection group should look into a better way to keep the horses sane; like Best Friends Animal Sanctuary?

    Horses in corral
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    Mossy Cave

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This is a part of the park that is outside the park and on Hwy 12. It is about 4 miles east from junction Hwy 163 going into the park, and between mile marker 17/18. The stop is well worth it. There is really a cave and a water pool and a cave. The hike is in two parts. The first gets you up to a bridge. Then next does a steep climb to the cave and water area. The hike is about 1 1/4 miles round trip. It is relatively easy, but some loose gravel and steep climbs are prominent. You cross foot bridges to the junction to the water falls.. One is a wide mossy overhang. The waer fall frop is 15 feet and a nice picture moment

    View of hoodoo's at mountain edge Water fall into the valley floor Falls from the creek above The cave is a mossy aea that has water dripping
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    The Bryce Lodge

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This was built in 1930's and has not changed a bit; well maybe upgrade of electrical and water and sewer system. Either way it is like going back in time to enjoy the quality and elegance of the old times. There is a restaurant inside and it serves all meals and packs lunches for trail hiking.

    View of the outside Inside of the lobby area Gift Shop for those tourists
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    Bristlecone Trail Hike

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 27, 2009

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    This is a relatively easy hike through the fir and Douglas pines to the edge of the cliffs and overlook the valley. It is one mile hike, and at Rainbow Point at the end of the park road; 18 miles. The hike is worth a short visit to see the different views.

    Map of the trail and area Looking down to a rock monument Tree lined trail
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    Peek a Boo Hike

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This hike is off the Navajo Loop trail hike and it is more rigorous than some others. The hike is best taken form the Navajo loop. Otherwise you would start at Sunrise Point, or Bryce Point and hike the full 5 miles on a tough trail I went in to the trail about one mile to try and find the hat shops hoodoo's. I did not see any by then, so turned around, tired and ready to go home. The hike was about 2 miles from Navajo junction.

    Deep drop offs to the bottom valleys Rock ledges are jagged Small hat shop rock standing tall Hat shops rock in the maze Hat Shop rock in the midst of formations
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    Wall Street Slot CAnyon

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    ON the Navajo loop trail of the 5 miles is this wonder. You take the trail from Queens Garden area and it connect to Navajo on a loop. Make the wide swing to the Wall Street slot. After the sites, you walk up a bunch of steps in the rock walls and it has a lot of switchbacks. A bit fatiguing. This is the most interesting part of the hikes I did in the park, just for the absolute steep drop to the slot, and then the slot itself.

    Looking down into the slot Walking down the switchbacks In the slot and happy-jumping for Norman Into the slot 200 yer old tree growing in the slot
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    Queens Garden-Navajo Trails

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This is a 5 miles hike, and some of it challenging to maneuver to and through. I got it done, though. I never could swear I saw the Queen Victoria, but maybe in the rocks somewhere. I did go through where is it located by the arch. Some areas on the trail are steep drop offs, and somewhat intimidating if you have that vertigo; like me.

    First leg of Queen's Garden trail Steep drop off the trail edge View lkooking through the rock wedge Straight into the abyss The carved arch on the trail & Queen in rear
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    Bryce Point -Under Rim Trail

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This is a nice view of more amphitheater views and an arch to get up close to. The trail goes for about 10 miles all the way down to Rainbow Point. I went only 1 mile one way to see the sites and turned around. I am not super man, and get tired after a hard day of site seeing. For the short distance I went, the trail was good and fairly easy.

    Looking down into the trail head Continuing spread of amphiteater Different eroded rock in the wall face Sign of trail elevation
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    Amphiteater is Tops

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    The view of the hoodoo's in the amphitheater is beyond description, but I will try a little. Hoodoo to Indians means a sacred person who became a rock statue. Well, these have more history that a human. Over 350 million years these rocks were formed, and keep evolving today. Hanging on the edge before they tip over, they are an unbelievable site. So see it.
    The main views of the amphitheater are from Sunrise Point to Sunset Point. That is an easy 1 1/2 mile walk on a paved path along Rim Trail. It is along a path that has a rail for deterrence so you do not hang over too far.

    View range of many hoodoo's White colored hoodoo's Hoodoo's are in the valley wash Close up of rock pinnacles Walls of sheer rock
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    Bryce in Winter

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    My first trip to Bryce was in November of 1994. I had spent the previous night in Zion National Park and it had snowed quite a bit there overnight. I was not prepared for how much more snow there would be at Bryce or it's not likely I would have made the drive in my small Honda Civic with no snow tires. The trails were totally covered but you could go a bit into the canyon by just plowing down. These are a few of the photos from that trip. While not of the best quality it gives you an idea of what Bryce looks like after a good snowfall. Notice the small elf-like rock formation resplendent with snow cap!

    little elf with snow cap what a Christmas tree this makes
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    The Queen's Garden

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    The easiest descent into the canyon is The Queen's Garden Trail. It starts at Sunrise Point and drops 320 feet over a close to one mile to a rock formation that looks appropriately enough like Queen Victoria. This is an in and out hike and is steep but well worth the effort. If not used to such steep trails, take your time. It's a little less than two miles round trip so no matter how slowly you do it you'll be back up before you know it. This can be made into a loop with The Navajo Loop which begins at Sunset Point.

    just a hundred feet into the canyon
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    Rim Trail

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    While the viewpoints give a nice perspective of Bryce Canyon and for many it is all they can physically do, if you are at all able to walk, you should try and tackle some of Bryce's short hikes. I am not sure if you can hike such a short distance anywhere else and get such amazing views.

    The short section between Sunrise and Sunset is very flat and paved but the entire length is a more up and down affair of 11 miles. It is not a loop but during the summer months, you can catch a shuttle back to from where you started. It is amazing how little traffic you see once you go north of Sunrise Point. While not a wilderness experience, you still get a much more private feeling of the park.

    the Rim Trail gives you a different perspective
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    Fairyland Point

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    Fairyland Point gives an interesting perspective of Bryce Amphitheater, looking in the opposite direction than you normally would. It is an intimate view and best taken in by walking the rim trail from Sunrise Point or as part of the Fairyland Loop. You can also drive or take the shuttle bus to Fairlyland Point but the Rim walk over is the way to do it if you are able and have the time.

    a steep view into the canyon
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    Sunset Point

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    While the park suggest visiting Rainbow Point first it is likely your first view of the canyon will be from Sunset Point. If you could only see the canyon from one vantage point, it should be from here just prior to sunset or from Sunrise at dawn. Sunset surely has the tightest cluster of hoodoos in the most colorful hues of pink in the park. As the sun goes down, they get ever warmer in color and it's well worth making the effort to be here this time of the evening. The park's premier day hike, The Navajo Loop, starts and ends here.

    the sinking ship as the sun sinks
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    Car Viewpoints: Natural Bridge

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 27, 2009

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    You can also stop at Black Birch Canyon, Ponderosa Canyon, and Agua Canyon en route to the Natural Bridge. There are plaques to read and different views but to be honest we didn't find any of them “can't miss” and I won't bore you with photos taken at them. The Natural Bride does provide something different to see though in fact is not a true bridge but an arch. It is not formed by the forces of water but by natural weakening due to expansion during freezing. No matter how it was formed, it is made of some gorgeous red rock of the Clarion Formation. This contrasts beautifully with the green of the Ponderosa pines peeping through.

    the Natural Bridge is worth a photo stop
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