Dinosaur National Monument Travel Guide

  • Dinosaur National Monument
    by Basaic
  • Visitors Center
    Visitors Center
    by Basaic
  • Dinosaur Quarry Display Building
    Dinosaur Quarry Display Building
    by Basaic

Dinosaur National Monument Things to Do

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    by basstbn Written Mar 1, 2010

    The Green River is a deep and powerful river on its winding path through the Canyon of the Lodore in Dinosaur National Monument. We were fortunate to time our visit to see the arrival of a group of rafters who had been floating the river for six days, a trip that would have taken them through the scenic Flaming Gorge National Recreational Area. They were tired, but exhilarated from the trip.

    The boat ramps are located at the Green River Camp Ground, barely visible at the bottom of the main photo for this tip. This is a good place to get out and stretch your legs, walk along the river, picnic, etc.

    BIG Rock opposite camp ground on Green River
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    by basstbn Updated Mar 1, 2010

    The Fremont people* who inhabited this area from about 200 to 1300 AD left some remarkable examples of petroglyphs (rock art), many of which are located within the boundaries of the Dinosaur National Monument. The rock art as shown here, where the design is chipped or carved into the rock, is known as petroglyphs; that which is applied with pigment is called pictograms. There is much speculation regarding the meanings or purposes of these petroglyphs, just as there is about what happened to the Fremont people and where they went.

    Due to past incidences of vandalism, park officials do not disclose the locations of most. Fortunately, one art-covered boulder (see directions below) is adjacent to one of the park roads, and vigilantly monitored by park rangers. Well worth a visit.

    *So named by archeologists and scholars because evidence of their culture was first found in the vicinity of the Fremont River.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    by basstbn Updated Mar 1, 2010

    For fifty years, Josie Bassett lived in seclusion in her little cabin at the end of a remote Utah canyon.

    That statement barely begins to tell the remarkable story of Josie Bassett - a self-sufficient farmer and rancher, four times divorced, moonshiner, a friend and helper to the down and out, a cantankerous old coot of a character. Rather than try to tell you more, I will recommend to you the following article: http://historytogo.utah.gov/utah_chapters/pioneers_and_cowboys/josiebassett.

    Her cabin still stands and is located within the boundaries of the Dinosaur National Monument, and can be visited by tourists willing to drive clear to the end of the road. We found it to be a beautiful setting in early June, and enjoyed strolling around her cabin site and the neighboring meadow.

    Josie's cabin View through trees toward the meadow Chicken coop; sturdy to fend off wildlife View behind Josie's cabin
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dinosaur National Monument

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

100 travelers online now

Comments

Dinosaur National Monument Travel Guide
Map of Dinosaur National Monument

View all Dinosaur National Monument hotels