Green River Things to Do

  • Green River at the edge of campground
    Green River at the edge of campground
    by BruceDunning
  • Golden top to
    Golden top to "Ratio"
    by Segolily
  • The Ratio
    The Ratio
    by Segolily

Best Rated Things to Do in Green River

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    Crystal Geyser

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 1, 2009

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    RAnge view of the geyser location
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    In the Out country of Green River is this geyser that spouts out every 12-16 hours, or so. I did not get to see that when there, but it surely has spouted some minerals out of the hole over the years. Copper colored minerals are prominent around the geyser. Trailerstone terraces the landscape, that has evolved from the water minerals leaching out slowly onto the ground. It is a cold water geyser so you could wait and touch the water without a burn. The site is a fabulous diversion from every day life. I walked a trail for a mile along the peaceful river.
    Location to to the east of town and take the road to the old White Sands Missile Base; go on beyond it and to the rear section, then follow a rough road to the geyser. Total distance is about 11 miles.

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    Goblin VAlley State Park

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    Three standing out in skyline
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    This is a trip worth a side diversion because of the different type rock formations, all concentrated in a small area. You can call them hoodoos, but maybe goblins hoodoos because the shape makes some feel they look like goblins. These mushroomed shapes rocks were formed from eroded sandstone rock that was carved by water over years. Colors of red and cream colors are wonderful. The valley is 2 miles long and one mile wide. Small overall. You can walk around and into the formations in the valley of climb some other trails in the hills surrounding them.
    The park was not formed until 1964, and had been a "hidden" secret since early 1900's due to the remote region. Park entry fee is $7 for the 1-2 hour viewing, but can take longer if you want some hiking. CAmping is $16 a nite. While I was there the roads were torn up for some resurfacing and grading. Overall, it was not a bad ride, though. A lot is blacktop surfaces.

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    Fossils are There Somewhere

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 1, 2009

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    Sign designating which way is Up
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    In the San Rafael Swell is a real desolate area that says it has fossils you can pick out of the rocks. I did not see any, but 3 hours of searching and driving taught me a lesson. Read directions, and do not believe all the hoopla of what is at the end of the road. I saw only rocks and dirt and ruts-huge and hard on the SUV. The trip was surely an adventure and only two others were way out there camping for the week. The scenery was magnificent, though, and another I will not forget.
    This location is over the railroad tracks and then follow to split in the road. Total distance is about 11 miles, with the last being rippled and rough dirt/clay.

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    SAn Rafael Swell

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 9, 2009

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    Location of the primary area ofthe Swell
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    This area is one of the last "almost" unexplored regions of the US. I tried to conquer it, and it is massive and impressive. There are different buttes, crest, monuments of rock standing tall, and simply you are out in the wilderness. It is named after the first known explorers in the region, the Spanish that had settlements in New Mexico. People came north to get to the west in order to avoid the INdians that reigned havoc on those unfortunates. The trail ran 2,700 miles from Santa Fe to Los Angeles. The history is fascinating.
    Current roads total about 2,000, but most are not easily navigable; I found out the hard way. It is lonely out there if stuck and hot.

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    Crested Buttes that are monumental

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 1, 2009

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    Colorful butte on horizon
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    So much of the skyline brings me to awe, thinking of just how these could be formed in the San Rafael Swell. The ground upheaval created a beauty that is hard to describe until seen close up and in person. These are part of the Henry mountains that basically run along US 70 for some distance. The swell from Green River is at around 4000 feet and then climbs another 2000 feet to reach the peak of the swell about 20-30 miles west.
    The main mountain range along here is called Book Cliffs; the longest line of rock ridge in the world, and that is where the name came from. It is said to look like a set of books stacked up, with the lined eroded sandstone veritical lines. The range is topped with Cretaceous sandstone, and the range runs 200 miles starting in Colorado.

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    Locals Swim in the River on a sandy bank

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 9, 2009

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    There is s "hidden" spot for most locals and some campers if they know where to look to solitude. The bank of the Green River has some good beaches of sand just to the north of town. The beach is called Swasey, and is about 2 miles back off the main Bus 70 on Hastings Road. Once found, it is a gem to enjoy for a while. The last 1/2 mile or so is "rough" on the vehicle and the road ends at where the edge of the hills come down to the river base. No more vehicle from there.

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    • Beaches
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    Melons Galore in September

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 17, 2009

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    Melon stands set up around town

    FAll melon festival. In the third week of September, the town and area has a fall festival to celebrate the completion of the season and the selling of the melons. I bought one, and it was good and tasty, and the whole thing filled me up. Watermelons are the more popular to grow, and they are smaller than the usual variety I am used to in Midwest, and seeds are plentiful. The land along the Green River is wetter than further away, but they also do irrigate this land to boot, when needed. Prices for small melons is $6 and large $10. They are not that big and the price was steep.

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    Tusher Wash

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 1, 2009

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    View going into the wash creek bed
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    This was thought to be one of those ventures to see what the end of a road looked like. It was dry form some time, so going through the actual creek bed (wash) may have been acceptable if flat bottom. I turned off just east of town on Hasting Road, toward the Gary CAnyon Rec area, and turned right about 5 miles in. After 2-3 more miles I came to the creek wash. The drive to get here was rough enough. I drove about 100 feet into the wash and decided that was enough for me. It had big rocks and was rutted all over. Turning around was difficult enough. The trip is to take you down the wash 6 miles and petroglyphs are at the end point. 4WD aside, I would not recommend this to many.

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    John Wesley Powell Museum in Here

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 9, 2009

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    Sign at visitor center of museum

    Within the visitor center is a museum that shows the life of John Wesley Powell when he and some 9 others went down the river to reach the near end of Colorado River around today Las Vegas. He started in 1867 from the inception of the Green River in Wyoming, and followed it for 3 months through the Grand CAnyon to end past there. He had 4 leave the expedition over this time and lost 2 of 4 boats. The museum is $4 and along with it is some artifacts in the lobby as well as gifts for sales. The greeters are very pleasant and helpful.

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    Green River State Park

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 9, 2009

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    Picture of the park lake area
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    A number of people come here to relax and camp along the setting of the river. Judging form the number of camping slots filled, it must be popular. Next to it is golfing, and they can river raft if desired, or take long hikes out in the back country. Day passes to visit the park are $5 and annual $70; with camping charges of $15 a day.

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    The Very Best Melons In The Entire WORLD!!

    by RoscoeGregg Written Jun 5, 2011

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    Here is a stand from my car

    The environment and the history at Green River combine to produce melons of the very finest quality. The soil is loose and sandy and the summer is long and hot. This is a fantastic combination for melon production.

    There are farm families here that have been producing melons for several generations so they have it wired. Good land well trained farmers=excellent melons.

    Every fall the farmers’ set up melon stands around town. You would be hard pressed to miss them.

    Immediately pull over and buy a melon and eat it. Then buy another one for later.

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    River Runner Hall of Fame

    by Segolily Updated Dec 7, 2009

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    JW Powell monument
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    The John Wesley Powell Museum is right on Main Street on the east shore of the the river, towards the east end of town. I was surprised at the amount of information it had. Lots of good photos, accounts and little known facts about the epic trip down the Green and Grand River by Mr Powell in 1869. He and his company started in Green River Wy where the new transcontinental railroad allowed the equipment to be shipped to. After boating into the unknown they emerged much scathed and much experienced and with a journal that continues to be the original primer for modern boatman down the same path.
    Besides which it had a River Runner Hall of Fame. It was great to read about other men and women whose life, work and experiences have shaped the nature of the rivers today.
    Take at least an hour, better two. Visit the very nice if small, gift shop as well.

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    Check out Monument Hill

    by Segolily Written Feb 22, 2014

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    Golden top to
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    Back in the early 1980's the train used to stop in Green River. A man named Herbert Steiner came into town on the train and while there learned some nearby land was being sold. He decided to buy it. He lives in Seattle, but decided he wanted to be remembered by something more solid than a headstone at a cemetery and commissioned artist Andrew Rogers to create a sculpture for his land in the desert country of Green River.

    Then a few years later he commissioned another one. The two sculptures are just south of the old train station on a hill now known as Monument Hill. There are no directions on how to reach them, and once there you have no explanation about what you are seeing. Both sculptures are made of concrete.

    The first one is called "The Ratio". It is based on the Fibonacci Sequence. This is a math based sequence in which the series of numbers are created by adding the last two numbers together to create the next number.... thus 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc. It is similar to the Golden Ratio- thus its name. It is a series of boxes, with the top "1" plated with 24 carat gold. Seen in the setting sun it glows.

    The second sculpture finished in 2013 is called "Elements". It consists of four pillars two round, and two square representing Earth, Wind, Fire and Water.

    A series of boxes connects the two sculptures each slightly larger as they come closer to the Ratio. They are certainly meaningful, though I've found nothing to say in what way.

    These are intriguing and are an interesting visit while in the area.

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