Green River Warnings and Dangers

  • Actually that is a cow-but you get the point
    Actually that is a cow-but you get the...
    by BruceDunning
  • Sheep-not deer on the road here
    Sheep-not deer on the road here
    by BruceDunning
  • Warning to be on Lookout for deer
    Warning to be on Lookout for deer
    by BruceDunning

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Green River

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    Animals on the Highway

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 1, 2009

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    I was fortunate to avoid a collision with a deer the sprang out of the ravine and then just stopped dead in his tracks on the highway; so to speak. Well, as I was traveling at 80 MPH and the notice of the deer was abrupt, I tired to maneuver around it by taking another lane since I could not stop in time and did not want to head for the ditch. Just then, the deer took off crossing that lane and got into the median. For real, it is dangerous driving in remote areas that are unfenced.

    Actually that is a cow-but you get the point Sheep-not deer on the road here Warning to be on Lookout for deer
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    • Road Trip

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    GAs Up & Load Up Before Driving

    by BruceDunning Written Nov 5, 2009

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    There is a distance of about 75 miles heading east to next town of Grand Junction Colorado, and 110 miles going west through SAn Juan Basin. So the advice is get what you need first before looking on the road.

    warning of sevices
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    • Road Trip

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    ATV's CAn CArve a Niche

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    Unfortunately, in my opinion, there is too much allowance of ATV and motor bikes use around here. It ends up that many riders go where they are not alowed, or should not, in spite of even some warnings not to venture in eoc sensitive areas. Even though there seems to be so much land, and unused, it still is an eco sensitive geology area, and any tracks create a bad impact on the hills and rocks. See what one did to a hill close to town. Locals, but also many tourists come here to use the ATV's for adventure. I think walking is a better way to have fun. The communities look the other way for the sake of tourism dollars. Where is Al Gore when you need him to stand up and protest?

    Ruts of tracks on the hills CAmpers with the Motor bikes ready to ride
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Bats! Yes, bats. One of our...

    by NorineP Written Oct 4, 2002

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    Bats! Yes, bats. One of our group was dive bombed by bats. Who knows why? We sure don't. The bats didn't bother anyone else, just him. It was so bad, he had to put a skillet on top of his head to keep them off, and I hate to say this, he even tried to swat them with the skillet a few times. Luckily he never touched any of them, but he was running around like a crazy person for awhile.

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    I didn't really think about...

    by NorineP Written Oct 4, 2002

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    I didn't really think about how inaccessible the outside world was. But when we got into the trip, the lack of contact with anyone, including park rangers, became apparant when one of our members was accidentally 'stabbed' by her brother. She still won't let him forget that incident. If it becomes necessary to evacuate someone, you should stop all passing trips and tell them the situation or try to signal any airplanes with a signal mirror or by placing life jackets in a large 'X' pattern on the beach or sandbar. But your best bet is to stay on the river and get to the takeout as quickly as possible.

    It is vital that a very good first aid kit be included with your equipment. Also WATER, WATER, WATER!! You cannot rely on water being available after put in at Mineral Bottom. Pack as lightly as possible...this isn't a fashion show..and leave as much space for water as possible. You should take at least 1 gallon per person per day.

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    Along the way, you may come...

    by NorineP Written Oct 4, 2002

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    Along the way, you may come across numerous prehistoric Indian sites. You may see strutures or rock art. These structures and art may be very fragile and are irreplaceable. Climbing into a ruin can dislodge the mud mortar and loosen rocks. Even though you may see inscriptions from historic river runners and explorers, try to refrain from adding your own. You can record your visit at the River Register.

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    Before embarking on a trip on...

    by NorineP Written Oct 4, 2002

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    Before embarking on a trip on the Green River, it is necessary to do some advance planning. The land is primitive and there are no facilities. Temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit are common in June, July and August and thunderstorms are common during July and August.

    While the Green River is generally a calm river, you should wear a life jacket at all times when on the river. The current runs around 4 miles per hour and if you tip over, it is very difficult to get back to the shoreline. If this happens, you may have to float a mile or so, before being able to maneuver to the shore.

    If you hear your feet making crunching noises while walking in the desert, you are most likely walking on crytobiotic soil crusts composed of brown or black plants. These plants are crushed when stepped on and it can take years for the plants to recover. These soils are nature's way of retarding erosion. It is best to walk on rocks or established trails whenever possible.

    All garbage and trash must be carried out...this means your solid human waste also ;) I know, no one wants to carry the waste bucket...take turns..lol. Fire pans are required also. The ash from your fire may be disposed of in the main channel of the river, but not in the backwater, since it can be harmful to young squawfish. If we take care of nature's wonders, they will remain for all for years to come.

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Green River Warnings and Dangers

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