Kanab Things to Do

  • Happy Maria is ready to go - RAPPELL!
    Happy Maria is ready to go - RAPPELL!
    by Laurelea
  • We were all dirty and VERY happy end of day!
    We were all dirty and VERY happy end of...
    by Laurelea
  • SSA took Al into a seldom seen Slot Canyon
    SSA took Al into a seldom seen Slot...
    by Laurelea

Most Recent Things to Do in Kanab

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    Montezuma's Treasure Cave

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 25, 2015

    This is a cool site. The cave is located right next to the road, just north of Moqui Cave.
    The cave is located on private property, but most people go through the fence, for a closer look. We stopped on the side of the road, as it got our attention, and took some pictures. There is a small dock, picnic table, and large statue, that closely resembles the ones at Tula.
    Apparently, this flooded cave, located about 7 miles north of Kanab, UT, was the final resting place of Montezuma's gold hoard.
    I visited this site back in 2010, but had no idea about the treasure. We just stopped to take pictures, as we had never seen a flooded cave before. I thought it was just a unique geological feature, and nothing more. I only found out about the treasure recently, while watching an episode of "America Unearthed".
    How Montezuma's treasure ended up in a flooded cave in Utah, is a mystery. The legend might've come into being because of Montezuma's Castle, in the neighboring state of Arizona. Though there is no archaeological evidence to support the claim that Montezuma or the Aztecs actually made it to the American Southwest, and that's why it's exactly that, only a legend.
    Despite the lack of archaeological evidence, many believe the legend to be true. Freddie Crystal was the first person to search for the treasure, in 1914, after he found some petroglyphs in the area, and a map in a Spanish monastery, which he believed were both clues to the treasure's location. Since than, dozens of adventurous treasure hunters, including Scott Wolter, have attempted to locate the treasure, to no avail, mainly due to an underwater passageway that's too narrow for divers. There is even a legend of a curse. Several treasure hunters are believed to have died, while others have claimed to had their gear malfunction, while diving for the treasure.
    For nearly 5 centuries, the cave has kept its secret. The only way to really know what's down there, would be to drain the lake. This is not possible, as it is home to the highly endangered Kanab ambersnail, and killing just one, will get you a $5,000 fine. However, if one found the treasure, they could easily pay it off, so I guess it'd be worth it in the long run. But, I guess until the lake disappears due to natural causes, this flooded cave in the Utah desert, will keep its secret.

    Many locals and none locals believe the treasure is here, while others believe it has already been found. And the curse doesn't deter the occasional treasure hunter, from hoping to strike it rich.
    Even if you're not treasure hunting, or think the legend is a load of nonsense, it's still worth stopping to take some pictures, as it is a lovely area.

    Even if the cave doesn't hold any treasure, it's still an interesting local legend. If anything, it would make a great plot for the next "National Treasure" movie.

    To learn more about the legend of Montezuma's treasure, click on the link below, watch "America Unearthed", or talk to Lex Chamberlain at Moqui Cave.

    Flooded Cave Desert Oasis Replica Of Tula Statue
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    Buckskin Gulch

    by goodfish Updated Jan 17, 2015

    A big giant fail for us but I’m including this bit in case you have better luck or a greater tolerance for mud.

    At somewhere around 12-13 miles in length, Buckskin is the longest, deepest slot canyon in North American and possibly in the world. As mentioned in my review for Wire Pass, the slot canyon used for access, we’d intended to make a day of it by combining that one with a few miles in and out of the gulch. I’d expected some chilly pools but we hadn’t counted on running into those almost from the get-go, or for a deep layer of grease-slick mire. The pictures above were taken before the point that it got nasty, and even here we had trouble not slipping off the driest center of the floor. Rain the before night was, I’m sure, a factor in what was probably muckier than normal conditions.

    With no water source for clean-up, a rental SUV and long-ish drive back to Page, we took one look at what lay beyond this point and threw in the towel. I was beating myself up a little for being such a pansy when we ran into a couple of well-conditioned and equipped lads who’d gone a little beyond our turn-around point before giving it up themselves. They were one heck of a mess, and I felt a wee bit better about wimping out!

    I’d love to give this one another go someday, and good buddy Blueskyjohn has done it as part of a multiday, 42-mile trek from Lee’s Ferry so if you want details, give him a shout. Otherwise, here’s one of the better route descriptions I’ve seen:

    http://climb-utah.com/Escalante/buckskin.htm

    See my own review on the route through Wire Pass to the confluence between these two canyons:

    http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/24213d/

    A couple of cautions: never do this one with rain in the forecast, and make a stop at the Paria Contact Station - a couple of miles east of the turnoff to House Rock Valley Road - to check conditions before venturing in. HRV Road may also be impassable after a recent rainfall, and a high-clearance vehicle is recommended. No water or other facilities at the trailhead so bring everything you need with you. See the BLM website below for day-use fees and overnight permits.

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    Wire Pass

    by goodfish Updated Jan 17, 2015

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    We’d driven up here from Page 'cause we weren’t going to have time to hike it on our way to Zion. The plan was to escape the brutal heat with a fun day of combined scrambling though this 1.7 mile canyon plus 3-4 miles into connecting Buckskin Gulch. Both are in the Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness, and the trail is an entry point for North Coyote Buttes and The Wave: a hiker’s dream destination accessible only with a frustratingly difficult-to-score lottery permit. Someday…!!!

    It turned out to be more work for a mere .5 mile worth of slot than we’d bargained for. Starting with a 34-mile drive west on 89, getting to the trailhead was a slow, painful rattle along eight miles of House Rock Valley Road: the BLM’s description of the thing as “unmaintained” was an understatement. A mile-long tromp in unshaded wash finally brought us to the mouth of the canyon’s narrows and an easy 1/2 mile through two slots - except for one block of chockstones that took some doing. Near the end, at the confluence with Buckskin, it opens up to a huge alcove with some petroglyphs, and on out to a wide area of towering red cliffs and open sky.

    Here we took a right into the more dramatic slots of the Gulch and ran into deep, nearly impassable mud and pools after just a few hundred feet or so. Rain the night before had turned the clay surface of the floor into a real mess that wasn’t just deep, it was like walking on glare ice. Nope. Pools we can handle but what promised to be an unending stretch of greasy muck got the better of us.

    About face: another wrestle over those chockstones; another mile in the wash; another teeth-rattling crawl on those 8 miles of “road”; 34 miles back to Page. In hindsight, I’d give this one a go only if you can do it enroute to Page from the north or Kanab/Zion from the south, and it’s been a dry stretch of weather. House Rock Valley Road will likely be impassable after rain, and it’s a good idea to stop into the Paria Contact Station (on 89, not far from the HRV Road turnoff) to check conditions before heading in.

    $6 per person fee but no permit needed: use the pay box, and sign in/out in the trailhead register. No water or other facilities. See the website below for directions.

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    Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park

    by goodfish Updated Jan 16, 2015

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    My first sand dunes! It was sort of a smallish piece of windswept desert, and there weren’t any camels or palm trees but a few very decent piles all the same. We made this 22-mile detour off 89 on our way to Zion one morning, and spent a couple of hours wading around, snapping pictures and guessing what sort of creatures had left their tracks in the fine, pink-ish drifts. A few of those critters - beetles, lizards and a tarantula - were scrambling around for their breakfast but, although telltale sidewinding patterns marked their presence, the snakes were hiding.

    High winds channel tiny grains of red Navajo sandstone through a cleft between the surrounding mountains, and drop them into this valley where they’ve collected into continually shifting hills which can move up to 50 feet a year. There is a walkway and viewing platform if you’re not into getting your shoes or toes full of the stuff but a plod around in it is good - abet laborious - fun. And I usually HATE hiking in sand.

    There’s a small visitor center, restrooms, picnic area, nature trail and campground, and ATV riding/sand boarding is allowed on most of the dunes: there’s a rental company on the north end of the park:

    http://utahatvtour.com/index.html

    Kids along? They’ll love a romp in this giant sandbox! Just give ‘em a good dusting off before letting them back in the car.

    See the website below for entry and camping fees, hours and other information.

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  • Laurelea's Profile Photo

    Rappelling Down So'Utah Canyon Walls!

    by Laurelea Written Oct 30, 2013

    A Finnish couple were returning to our tiny B&B here in Kanab, we decided to celebrate so spent a day Canyoneering/Rappelling with Seldom Seen Adventures. Oh wow, oh wow!! After our final rappell Mayank heaved a huge sigh and asked if we could start over again. Nick, Owner of SSAdventures, is a pro and obviously loves his job. He waited until he met us to determine the adventure of the day, I really appreciate that 'cause I'm fairly athletic but terrified of heights. None of us had ever gone canyoneering before, Nick & Richard tucked us under their arms and gave us the experience of a lifetime. Imagine dropping (safely) down a canyon wall, surrounded by verdant hanging gardens...I could say much, much more re; how great it was in every way. Hope you try it! They've taken people from age 6 - 78 out, Nick offers the best experiences around Bryce/Zion as well as our hidden canyons around Kanab. I still get excited thinking about it. After the rappelling adventure, I sent other guests out with Nick to discover Seldom Seen Slot Canyons and that was astounding as well.

    Happy Maria is ready to go - RAPPELL! We were all dirty and VERY happy end of day! SSA took Al into a seldom seen Slot Canyon

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  • Frontier Movie Town

    by gminer1 Written Aug 12, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I went to the Movie Museum in Kanab and was very unpleasantly surprised. I took my children who were very excited about the chance to see how western movies were made. Not a good idea. This is NOT a family friendly business. Upon entering the "museum" there was only a store (clearly a tourist trap). I was OK with that. Kids like to look at stuff. They found some headsets that played western music and started to listen. From behind the counter one of the clerk starts screaming that if my kids broke it they would buy it. Now I'm OK if she were to say, "Please be careful boys, that's and expensive piece of equipment." Screaming and them like an insane person, not so effective. I might add that the equipment is precariously perched on a not so stable cabinet that could easily be knock over if bumped. We walked through the store looking, having gone in expecting to have a nice experience and prepared to buy souvenirs for our trip. The screaming soured the experience. At the back of the property there were several old movie sets where we spent a little time. No tours, no explanations, no interaction with the employees who were wondering around the property. With the sets there they really could make this a fun stop in Kanab. Instead they call their Store a MUSEUM! What a CROCK. We will not be going back and advise all we speak to SKIP IT when they make their annual trips through Kanab. It's not worth the aggravation.

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    Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park

    by mikelisaanna Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park is definitely worth a side trip if you are exploring southern Utah. Its highlight is a large area of sand dunes that are pink in color due to the fact that the sand was formed from the erosion (by the wind) of red sandstone rock. You can hike among the dunes to your heart's content, wlthough beware - the sand is hot! For those not willing to get sand in their shoes, there is a boardwalk that you can walk on.

    The boardwalk and dunes in Coral Pink Sand Dunes p Anna at Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park Anna exploring the pink sand dunes Mike Lisa, and Anna at Coral Pink Sand Dunes State The pink sand dunes
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Local Animal Characterizations

    by BruceDunning Updated Jan 1, 2010

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    There are a number of animal statues and carvings around town that are of interest. These are some of those. They all are different and unique and have significant meaning to the locals. The main theme is to memorialize the movie set history around the area-and then the others? for tourism purposes. Buffalo used to be on the range around here, but no longer; only the memory and statues are left now.

    Film wrapped buffalo by visitor center Steel Stallions by Denny's Wigwam Many Stuffed animals inside Denny's Carved Kodiak Bear in Denny's Wigwam front Figurines in front of movie set/gift shop
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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Historic Town Tour

    by BruceDunning Updated Jan 1, 2010

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    They have a tour set up to see the older homes along a couple of streets near the Visitor Center. The tour is nice, and the homes preserved, and locals are pround of their heritage in settling this town. There are 5 basic restored homes along 1st Street South and Main St. They have a little literature for the history of each. Other sites on the tour spread around the town and the walk could take 1+ hours to see all. The pictures below are of a couple of the preserved homes. Some others are actually now closed, or "modified" to something else. Heritage House is open for tours in summer and on National Register. The home is from around 1885 era. The other house is called Rider-Pugh house. It is a Victorian from 1892, and descendants still live in the house today.

    Layout of the Home tour Walking Tour of 15 sites in town Heritage House Rider-Pugh House
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    Best Friends Animal Sanctuary

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 29, 2009

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    This is a large complex off Hwy 89 north of Kanab about 5 miles. A turn off and going down a side road take you to the complex. It is set up to take care of abandoned animals. It is the largest animal sanctuary in the US, and has an average of 1700 animals here at one time. A lot are not visible and located in another close by location to here. I do not know how they get this far out in the remote terrain, but it is a large area. They have a corral for some animals, a gift shops and information center. There are also places to stay overnight. Tours are available of the grounds. They have 27,00 annual visitors. It has been in operation for 25 years

    Main entrance to the office Welcome parking by friendly bear
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    Little Hollywood Movie Set

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 29, 2009

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    This is a saved movie set that was used for a number of cowboy movies filmed here. One more notable was Outlaw Josie Wales portrayed by Clint Eastwood. The town of Kanab had 300 cowboy movies made over years 1930 to 1990. Many times the set went out to the outback and rustic pristine areas in the region. I would not want to venture to see some of those because you get stuck in a vehicle on sandy roads. I did get stuck by the Paria movie set on Hwy 89 about 60 miles from Kanab. It was risky to get to the site, in my opinion
    This set is behind a gift shop and the entrance is free. It is at the North/west end of town on main street. The ulterior motive is to sell you some gifts in the shop that you have to walk through to see the set. It was small and merely a set up of small buildings, making it look like a bigger life setting that it was.

    Main entrance to the gift shop/movie set Main street of buildings You need a livery for the horses Adobe home used in the Indian attack
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    Moqui Cave

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 25, 2009

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    The Hopi interpretation for the name is "dead" in their language. This is a gift store and museum type store about 6 miles north of town on Hwy 89. It is unique to say the least. It was, unfortunately closed when I was in town. This is form the outside and a picture I found of inside. The Chamberlain family has operated this place for years and they are descendants of town founders. The sad part is the father went to prison for polygamy. He had 6 wives and 55 children. So why wouldn't the chance of someone being related around Kanab?
    The cave inside is 200 feet deep. It has the largest collection of dinosaur tracks. They also have Indian artifacts, arrowheads, rocks and minerals stones.
    It is open MOnday-Saturday 9-7PM

    Entrance to the cave-gift shop Brochure on the cave View of cave carved into the rock Inside Picture of the seating area.
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    Kanab Heritage Museum

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 25, 2009

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    This museum was closed when I was there, but I got information for when you return. It is a cultural center that has some local art works and some town artifacts. This used to be an old school and not very big. From what I learned, there is not a lot inside to make a long tour of it. Admission is free.

    Brochure of location
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    climb the dunes at dusk

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 17, 2009

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    Though there is an informative walk through the dunes with signs explaining some of the nuances of life in the desert, the most rewarding hike is to just tramp along in the dunes. It's quite a workout so don't underestimate it. There are no trails per se so keep an eye on the parking area though if you get up high you shouldn't have a problem finding your way back to your car or tent! Doing it mid-day is not the best choice for two reasons. First, it's a lot hotter and you'll need to carry ample water. Second, the light is not its best so go at dawn or dusk for the best experience, and picture.

    D clmbing the dunes for a bird's eye view
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    Frontier Movie Town

    by filipdebont Written Sep 30, 2007

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    Enkel de foto werd gepost, in afwachting van de informatie, deze informatie komt wat later.

    bedankt voor uw bezoek en tot nog eens.

    I have just posted the photograph, the text with more information will follow later on

    Thanks for your visit and you are welcome to revisit later on.

    Frontier Movie Town
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