Mexican Hat Things to Do

  • From valley to valley
    From valley to valley
    by Assenczo
  • Cedar Mesa framed
    Cedar Mesa framed
    by Assenczo
  • Mexican Hat environs
    Mexican Hat environs
    by Assenczo

Best Rated Things to Do in Mexican Hat

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Places to visit

    by JLBG Written Jul 2, 2005

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    Goosenecks State Park and Valley of the Gods are two sites worth the visit but we were short of time and had to skip these places. May be next time ! However, even if you do not make any visit and only drive the Mokie Dugway, I strongly advise to do it in order to admire these superb landscapes.

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    View on Monument Valley

    by JLBG Written Jul 2, 2005

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    We were lucky that a storm was brewing in the background, which made an even more dramatic landscape ! And what a background, Monument Valley itself ! I feel (not absolutely sure) that on the right of the picture, one of the Mittens is showing, still lit by the sun, while the other is further right and already dark, in the storm.

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    Mokie Dugway

    by JLBG Updated Jul 2, 2005

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    When you drive from Natural Bridges National Monument to Monument Valley, you can take road 261 (the Mokie Dugway) for 50 km. It is an excellent dirt road with a great landscape and if you are used, as we were, to mountain roads and do not care for winding roads at the edge of the abyss, you must do it !

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Nature is building bridges!!!!

    by Roeffie Updated Feb 8, 2008

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    Natural Bridges National Monument

    Natural Bridges protects some of the finest examples of ancient stone architecture in the southwest. The monument is located in southeast Utah on a pinyon-juniper covered mesa bisected by deep canyons of Permian age Cedar Mesa Sandstone. Where meandering streams cut through the canyon walls, three natural bridges formed: Kachina, Owachomo and Sipapu.

    At an elevation of 6,500 feet above sea level, the Monument is home to a wide variety of plants and animals. Plants range from the fragile cryptobiotic soil crusts to remnant stands of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine. Natural Bridges was established in 1908, making it the oldest National Park Service site in Utah.

    Natural Bridges
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    It's a long way there...................

    by Roeffie Updated May 8, 2003

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    Goosenecks State Park

    An incredible series of tight switchbacks of the San Juan River gives the area its name. It offers the visitor a close-up view of an entrenched river meander, one of the most striking and impressive examples on the North American continent. The 1,500 foot deep chasm meanders 6 miles while advancing only 1 1/2 miles.

    On the parking lot next to the viewing area, Indians often sell their homemade souvenirs.

    Goosenecks State Park

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    Get down there...................

    by Roeffie Updated May 8, 2003

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    Driving the Mokie Dugway you get great views on the most southeastern part of Utah. You look down to The Valley of the Gods and
    Goosenecks State Park.

    Coming from Natural Bridges National Monument you can drive down to Mexican Hat.
    Great views and exciting road to drive.

    Mokie Dugway

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    monument valley

    by dila Written Jan 13, 2004

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    monument valley is a valley with buttes, mesas, canyons and free standing rock formations that defy gravity.
    archaelogists have recorded more than 100 ancient Anasazi sites and ruines dating before A.D. 1300.
    you need a guide

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    Revelation

    by Assenczo Updated Oct 3, 2014

    Mexican Hat can be approached from three sides but the best one by far is the northern option. This is the route that comes from the Natural Bridges crosses the Cedar Mesa and ends up at a point of no return. After a grueling drive through some of the most spectacular desert scenery Utah can muster all the way from Escalante, the freelance driver is tired and ready for a long-anticipated break. Instead, the rim of the Cedar Mesa offers a climax, a profound sensation of deliverance akin to what must have been on Moses’ mind reaching the Sinai Peninsula via the Red Sea. Once all the magnificent beauty of the sprawling valley set on fire by the setting sun has been taken in, comes time for a thrill of different kind – the Moki Dugway. This road is the only possible connection between the escarpment and the valley and represents a series of vertigo-inducing switchbacks. Slow speed and concentration is the key to keeping alive despite the allure of the glamorous view of the valley, beckoning the stranger like some brightly-clad diva wooing the poor Odysseus to her buxom and ultimately to his death.

    From valley to valley Mexican Hat environs Close up
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    Abode of Gods

    by Assenczo Written Sep 30, 2014

    The Valley of the Gods is the smaller cousin of the Monument Valley and she knows it. Nevertheless, this domicile of deities has no chipped shoulders. Being elusive with the help of the protective locals it adds mystery to mix of sand and stone, wind and sun. When going east from Mexican Hat the entrance can easily be overlooked since there is no sign. Once on track tough, one has the place practically deserted (deserted desert) devoid of cars and in full blossom of sweeping panoramas. The “monuments” themselves are on a smaller scale compared to the famous cousin but very refined with special prizes for visitors with imagination and knack for detail.

    Cedar Mesa framed Balancing Rocks Buttes Persian Soldiers
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    Play by the book

    by Assenczo Written Sep 30, 2014

    Mexican Hat’s location is a superb not only in geographical terms. It has the privilege to be sitting at the border of white folk’s territory and the Navajo nation’s tribal lands. While how independent the latter are is a matter of debate, there is no doubt that a sizable cultural gap is yawning along the San Juan River. Even high and dry Utah is no match for the uncompromising prohibitionists of the Navajo territory. Unfortunately, (or fortunately depending on the point of view of the beholder) the Shell station has all the trappings of the white man, namely and most importantly, liquor for sale. There seems to be no contradiction that drivers are exposed to beer in this locale since there is no other one and locals and visitors are blessed with its existence albeit in this controversial form. At the same time it seems to be a struggle for somebody who is dependent on alcohol beyond reason. Hence, reason is hammered with bold uncompromising announcements, screaming at the would-be trespasser and all others who dare use the gas station’s fridges.

    No comment Food for thought
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    Toe dipping

    by Assenczo Updated Oct 2, 2014

    San Juan River is a star canyonmaker: Goosenecks Park area is an impressive testimony. Naturally, one might be tempted to be in contact with a power of this magnitude. The location of Mexican Hat provides the perfect opportunity to do just that. Right beside the bridge that connects the town to the Navajo land across the river there is an access dirt road of 100 meters or so that leads to the very shores of the famous culprit. People have the chance to measure their expectations to the reality of a murky little river and try to conceal or not their amazement of how disproportionate the size of the river is to its carving prowess. Toe-dipping is easily done but not particularly attractive due to the high concentration of sediment being driven downstream together with the waters. Bathing is totally out of the question unless one has a weakness for mud baths and their alleged curative properties.

    Muddy saint Down-to-earth perspective
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