Moab Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Moab

  • KiKitC's Profile Photo

    Kane Creek Canyon

    by KiKitC Updated Oct 21, 2008

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    Red on Shelf
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    Though this trail is in Kane Springs Canyon, this trail is known as Kane Creek Canyon. This 13.7 mile trail takes you to the floor of Kane Creek Canyon, crossing the creek many times. Allow 3 or 4 hours once on the trail.

    Enjoy the break from the Moab heat as you cross the creek, surrounded by trees. Then, a steep, rather difficult, narrow photogenic shelf is your route out of the canyon.

    This trail used to be rated a 5, but was upgraded to a difficulty level of 6 due to erosion. This year, it's pushing a 7. Certain areas around the creek have washed out parts of the road, or left the trail with extreme obstacles.

    We really enjoyed the trip down into the canyon, looking at multi-colored cliffs all around us. It was dry when we started the trail, and unfortunately, the creek was nothing more than puddles in places. This area is dangerous as flash floods could come at any time...keep your eye on the sky.

    Most of the trail is rocky and off-camber, but the shelf on the way out is the most difficult the trail has to offer. Steep tiers of rock along the cliff side require careful tyre placement. It began to rain as we ascended the shelf, but made it out unscratched (almost...our guide hit a boulder and scratched the side of his truck really good).

    This trail certainly was great off road fun and very photogenic. Must try it again in the spring...when the creek is full.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

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  • KiKitC's Profile Photo

    Steel Bender

    by KiKitC Updated Oct 21, 2008

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    RedRover at The Fall
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    Steel Bender rates a 7 on a difficulty scale of 1 - 10. It provides numerous obstacles, only a couple not having bypasses. As put by a popular trail guide book, this trail is a real "bumper-thumper."

    Most of the trail is uneven, rocky lines with large rock obstacles. The trail is NOT for stock vehicles. Popular obstacles on this trail include "The Wall", "The Fall" and "Witches Step", as well as water crossing and numerous tall ledges. High ground clearance, excellent articulation and lockers are recommended.

    We had a great trail leader who was a fabolous spotter and got every truck (even stock trucks) through the most difficult spots. I believe only one vehicle broke on axle during the trip.

    The trail begins and ends in Mill Creek Canyon and measures 14.9 miles. Allow 5 to 6 hours to complete, more if you have a large group.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Adventure Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • KiKitC's Profile Photo

    Hell's Revenge

    by KiKitC Updated Oct 21, 2008

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    Hell's Revenge
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    Technically, Hell's Revenge rates a 4 on a difficulty rating of 1 to 10. The trail gets it's name not just from the petrified sand dunes resembling a frozen sea of hell fire, but also because it is not for the faint of heart. The trail is NOT intended for stock vehicles or novice drivers. Low gearing, good articulation, high clearance, high approach and departure angles necessary, and lockers are highly recommended.

    The trail is in the Sand Flats Recreation Area (fee applies...$6.00 for 3 days) and as you climb these sandstone hills, you can look out over miles of petrified dunes. The trail laid out over the horizon like a crayon line...

    Allow 4 to 6 hours for this 6.9 mile trail. There are two optional loops that bring you to more difficult obstacles...such as Hell's Gate and Escalator Loop. The sandstone acts like fly paper, the grip that the tyres got on that surface was better than asphalt. Even though we climbed and descended at extreme angles, the truck never once flinched off course.

    The first 100 yards, you climb up a sandstone fin, wide enough for one vehicle, and dropping on both sides. I had a panic attack right away. (I'm terribly afraid of heights). I convinced my husband to let me continue on the trail, only to face a much larger, higher, steeper obstacle. After that second panic attack, though, I was all right!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    Cataract canyon

    by Segolily Written Mar 3, 2008

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    Confluence with the Green
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    I took a four day motor powered trip down the Colorado through Cataract Canyon. It was a powerful and relaxing experience. It was a long time ago and there are other options now, but the canyon itself can still invoke the same reverence if you let it. In the days before waterproof and digital cameras we have few pictures to remind us or provide images to others of what the experience was like. But I can still remember the sound of the rapids we camped next to, the hot sand where we ate lunch, the taste of the honeydew melon, the cooling effect of the river water, the quiet, the stars, the river camaraderie, and the exhilaration of the final three big drops. Those were some huge boulders blocking our way. Even with the motor they had us paddle to increase our speed, and I still have the image of one of the other boats whose oarsman tried to make it through without the motor and got stuck on a rock. His frantic efforts to get the motor started while perched up on top of that huge house size boulder is etched in my mind.
    I am grateful for the memories

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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  • kimspangrude's Profile Photo

    Take a Drive Down Potash Road

    by kimspangrude Written Feb 21, 2006

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    About 12 miles down Potash Road, there is a turnout where you can park and find the trailhead to Corona Arch. It is near the tracks of the Denver-Pacific Railway which runs through a huge canyon. The Colorado River is not far from the turnout either.

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Location of Corona Arch (in Moab area)

    by Trekki Updated Aug 31, 2005

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    Map for locating Corona Arch

    Map of the area around Moab - to find Corona Arch, Bowtie Arch and Pinto Arch.

    Description of Corona Arch - see other off-the-beaten path tips.

    The map is taken from the book:
    "Hiking the Southwest's Canyon Country"
    by Sandra Hinchman, published by Mountaineers.(mine is ed. 1990 and was USD 12,95 in 1996).

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    "The Skull"

    by Trekki Written Aug 31, 2005

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    the

    Close to Corona Arch, I came across this very funny looking rock formation - it just looks like a big skull - ok, nose is missing.

    Not yet sure of the name, still research doing on this question.

    But it's near Corona Arch, just past it.

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Corona Arch - one of the many arches off the park

    by Trekki Updated Aug 31, 2005

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    Corona Arch

    Corona Arch, which resembles the famous Rainbow Bridge, is located out of Moab, in the west.

    The arch (composed of Navajo sandstone) has around 150 feet in diameter.

    To go there, you need to drive north out of Moab on US-191. Turn left at Potash Road into UT-279. The road follows the north-western bank of Colorado River, for about 10 miles. There is a sign to show where to turn right to park the car.
    When hiking to Corona Arch, you will also see Pinto Arch (or Gold Bar Arch) and Bowtie Arch - and finally Corona Arch.
    Round-trip hike is around 2-3 hours, moderate hiking (some steep paths).

    Detailed Map is placed in a separate tip.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    Traveling by auto? Here are some trips for you.

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Jul 12, 2004

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    Route to Dead Horse Point State Park

    So you are in Moab, you have your car, jeep, or truck with you. Maybe you would like a break from your physical outdoor activities, maybe you are not physically able to participate in these types of activities, or have young children in tow. Maybe you would just like to get out and spend a day or more exploring the countryside around Moab. Moab has a variety of scenic auto tours you can drive ranging from two hours to a full day. You may wish to combine these outings with short hikes, or just view the scenery from your car. You can enjoy driving along a river, through beautiful canyons, over bridges, through a National Forest, along the roads of State or National Parks, or drive past ancient Indian petroglyphs. For full descriptions of scenic drives, including their length of time visit the web site listed below.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    Early People and Dinosaurs

    by KimberlyAnn Updated May 22, 2003

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    Examples of Rock Art Drawings

    At the information center (on Center and Main)you can pick up the self-guided "Moab Area Rock Art Auto Tour" and the "Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail" self guided walking tour. On the Rock Art Auto Tour you will see a variety of rock panels. Unfortunately, some of these have been vandalized, sporting modern day graffiti, but we still found the drive worth the effort. As you drive up the Kane Creek canyon toward the end of this driving exploration we came to a truly marvelous, up close experience with early man as we examined a huge boulder with unblemished rock art on all four sides. The figures and designs carved into the rock ranged from formative to historic Ute periods. One scene was a "birthing scene" with a presentation of a figure giving birth to a feet first baby. There were also various animal forms, centipedes, and triangular shaped humans. There is no sign at this site, and no fence or path leading to it, so if we hadn't picked up the pamphlet at the visitors center we wouldn't have be able to find this wonderful petroglyph. Also by one of the petroglyphs we saw an early "ladder" made of poles forced into a crack between two rock faces to enable the early man to climb up within the crevice.
    The Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail is 16 miles north of Moab, then another 2 miles on a bladed dirt road. The Dinosaur Trail is a ½ mile trail with numbered signposts that match the pamphlet we picked up at the information center. Here you could see fossilized bone pieces and impressions untouched in natural rock walls and boulders. We were able to see tail vertebra, leg bones, foot elements, backbone vertebra, bone fragments, ribs, and a spine. We also saw some fossilized wood and a huge packrat midden. Also in this area are the remains of an old copper mill and an old halfway stage station. These were constructed similar to the granaries made by early people in the area.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • Got_Snow's Profile Photo

    The first full day we were in...

    by Got_Snow Updated Sep 8, 2002

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    The first full day we were in Moab, Chris, Greg, Tim, and I aroze from a deep sleep to the sun rising over the La Sal Mountain Range. There was not a cloud in the sky. It was still a bit chilly, but that does not last too long in the deseret. Chris had done his homework on the different rides that we were going to bike, but we soon deviated from the 'plans.' We packed up our sleeping bags, and grabbed a quick gourmet breakfast (pop-tarts, granola bars, and Costa Rican coffee) because we were anxious to hit the trails! As soon as we were packed up and fed, we headed for the world famous Slickrock trail in Sand Flats Recreation Area. Before we even got our bike tires on the trail, we were competing with the four-wheel drive Jeeps on the drive up to trailhead. In the Sand Flats is were the majority of the Jeep competitions were taking place, so we were all headed for the same destination and same mission; ride/drive Slickrock. The traffic was insane. I must admit that the Jeeps out-numbered the mountain bikers. Once at the trailhead parking lot, we got our bikes and gear ready. We jumped on our rides and headed down the trail. The Slickrock trail is a loop that is about eleven miles long. No big deal, right? Wrong. This trail is quite technical and is not recommended for beginners. There are places were even the best riders have to get off and push or lift their bikes over huge rock drop-offs. While we were eating up all of the Slickrock, we came across a uni-cyclist. Our jaws dropped to our handle bars in disbelief. We were having enough of a time using two tires and this guy was only on one! 'This was one crazy son-of-a...!' I thought to myself. When we made it back to the trucks at the end of the ride there was a Life-Flight helicopter, ambulance, and Park Police in the parking lot. Apparently, the uni-cycler ate sh*t and broke his leg. I guess that my thoughts were right. He was one crazy, loco, S.O.B! I just hope that he is alright! Like they say two wheels are always better than one. The trip was started by a beautiful ride, and a good introduction to what we were going to be on for the next few days. Slickrock was truly worth the crowd and seeing everyone have a good time...even the 'Jeepers.'
    pic from AdventurePlanet.com

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  • Tri's Profile Photo

    Check out the 'Whataman...

    by Tri Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Check out the 'Whataman Formation' in Arches National Park. It's not on any guide maps, but it is the second most photographed formation in Utah (the Delicate Arch is #1). Look for it off to your left as you pass the Three Gossips in Arches National Park.

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  • worldtrekker's Profile Photo

    Hiking along Mill Creek. I...

    by worldtrekker Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Hiking along Mill Creek. I visited Moab about 12 times between 1996 - 1999 and unfortunately only found out about this hike during my last trip there in September 1999. It's really only known by locals but I'm sure the Visitor Center could help you find the trailhead which isn't that far from town. You do have to go down Millcreek Rd to get there. I don't know of any other spot in the area where you can take a dip to cool off other than in a swimming pool at your accommodation. We hiked for about an hour to get to this spot (photo). The trail continued on and we followed it for a bit before we turned around. It's an enjoyable walk through the canyon. Next time I will explore this canyon further!

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  • The best about our...

    by mariaryg Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The best about our rafting-trip was maybe the guide (a nice girl, I unfortunately don't remember her name) and the weather. We spent parts of the trip just floating in the river beside the boat, the temperature was great so there were no danger of getting ill.

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  • pagodas's Profile Photo

    Rent a Jeep and drive off the main roads

    by pagodas Written May 10, 2008
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    To really experience these tremendous canyons and their mind-boggling vistas, you need to rent a jeep--unless you want to peddle your butt off all day on a bike. An ATV or a MX would work nicely too.

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Moab Off The Beaten Path

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