Moab Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by blueskyjohn

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Moab

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    Copper Ridge Dinosaur tracks

    by blueskyjohn Updated Aug 10, 2013

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    These are very interesting tracks because of there size. There is a sign at the location with some historical information. These tracks can be 23 miles north of Moab. On the left side (if you are driving north) there is a large microwave tower. Make the next right and drive for a few miles to the parking area. It is a very easy hike up to the tracks.

    some tracks have rocks around them to help spot cool lizard
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Desert
    • Archeology

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    Green River-Cyrstal Geyers

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    There is a geyser to the south of town and it is worth a nice trip. Green River is 70 miles northwest of Moab and easily reached via highway driving. The road to Crystal Geyser is another trip. It requires going through the old missile base of Government, and the roads are not maintained, but passable. Located about 9 miles from main street in town.
    The geyser is of cold water-so you can touch it. The rust colored forms are from such mineral rich soils in the underground. It spews up every 12-16 hours, and I did not get to see that, but a little trickler is close by. The travertine means rust terraces, and the surface around the geyser is rippled in a wonderful setting.

    Pools of water around the geyser hole Panorama view of geyser and river behind it Little gurgle geyser bubbling up Travertine ripples formation Travertine ripples formation
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

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    SAn Rafael Swell

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    SAn Rafael has been a place least known probably in the whole country. This is the last of an untapped area of the US. It still has many areas that have not been thoroughly explored. Around it, are some designated places to see. It is called Castle Country and has high peaks that get snow in winter, and desert badlands that really are bad to travel in some places. The area was once ranched more, but tough weather and terrain detered people form settling in numbers since early 1800's. There are to be 2,000 miles of road going through this area that spreads out for around 500 square miles, but few are passable with a normal highway vehicle; you need 4x4or motor bike.

    It would be about 70 miles from Moab. Green River is also a spot to visit that is on US 70. Some hiking and driving tours are staged from here. There are only two roads without use of 4 wheel drive, and each travel along the fringe of the more rugged areas.

    Locarion to the west of Moab Map showing the region layout Huge gray mountain sticking out above all else Stretching mountains goes for miles Colorful mountain top mesa
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Mountain Climbing

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    Goblin Valley State Park

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    This park is located some distance form Moab, but a nice site that you will most likely not see anywhere else. It is a long 120 miles form Moab, and take Hwy 191 to US 70, then go past Green River about 10 miles and turn down Hwy 24 and go for 30 miles. The last trek is 11 miles down to the park. Cost is $7 daily, and camping for $16 a day is allowed. The adventure is seeing these hoodoos (called goblins) by tradition many years ago because they look like ghost goblins?)
    You can walk among the formations and into the surrounding hills for better viewpoints. The area is 2 miles long and one mile wide in a park of 3654 acres total.

    STanding tall together on horizon Hills in backjground of the Goblins Rows of goblins like on watch Eroded rock in various positions Road Sign of distances
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Wilson's Arch

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 14, 2009

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    This arch is right on the highway, and easy to see if not going over 80MPH. It is close to Hwy 46 turnoff, to the south maybe 2 miles, and about 10 miles from Needles Canyonlands turnoff further south. you can hike up to the arch very easliy

    Monument plaque on the Arch Clsoe up of the arch
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Cataract canyon

    by Segolily Written Mar 3, 2008

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    I took a four day motor powered trip down the Colorado through Cataract Canyon. It was a powerful and relaxing experience. It was a long time ago and there are other options now, but the canyon itself can still invoke the same reverence if you let it. In the days before waterproof and digital cameras we have few pictures to remind us or provide images to others of what the experience was like. But I can still remember the sound of the rapids we camped next to, the hot sand where we ate lunch, the taste of the honeydew melon, the cooling effect of the river water, the quiet, the stars, the river camaraderie, and the exhilaration of the final three big drops. Those were some huge boulders blocking our way. Even with the motor they had us paddle to increase our speed, and I still have the image of one of the other boats whose oarsman tried to make it through without the motor and got stuck on a rock. His frantic efforts to get the motor started while perched up on top of that huge house size boulder is etched in my mind.
    I am grateful for the memories

    Confluence with the Green cooling off the boats we had cliff jumping into Lake Powell
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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    Take a Drive Down Potash Road

    by kimspangrude Written Feb 21, 2006

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    About 12 miles down Potash Road, there is a turnout where you can park and find the trailhead to Corona Arch. It is near the tracks of the Denver-Pacific Railway which runs through a huge canyon. The Colorado River is not far from the turnout either.

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    Halfway Stage Station

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 6, 2014

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    The Halfway Stage Station is another ruin site that is located off of Mill Canyon rd. this station served as the half way mark between Moab and Thompson which is where the train station was. It was 35 miles between Moab and Thomson so travelers would stop for lunch on there way to or from Thompson. The first train came to the area in 1883. All that remains is part of the stone wall within a fenced area. There are also some artifacts people have gathered and placed on the wall.

    There is a sign marking the location with a description.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Mill Canyon Copper Mill

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 6, 2014

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    This is a small ruin of a copper mill. All that remains in a stone wall and a black pile of fine rocks left over from the smelting process of the copper ore. There is also a pile of rusted cans and hardware from the era. This site is usually seen in conjunction with the Dinosaur Trail as they are across the dry wash from each other.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Desert
    • Hiking and Walking

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    The first full day we were in...

    by Got_Snow Updated Sep 8, 2002

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    The first full day we were in Moab, Chris, Greg, Tim, and I aroze from a deep sleep to the sun rising over the La Sal Mountain Range. There was not a cloud in the sky. It was still a bit chilly, but that does not last too long in the deseret. Chris had done his homework on the different rides that we were going to bike, but we soon deviated from the 'plans.' We packed up our sleeping bags, and grabbed a quick gourmet breakfast (pop-tarts, granola bars, and Costa Rican coffee) because we were anxious to hit the trails! As soon as we were packed up and fed, we headed for the world famous Slickrock trail in Sand Flats Recreation Area. Before we even got our bike tires on the trail, we were competing with the four-wheel drive Jeeps on the drive up to trailhead. In the Sand Flats is were the majority of the Jeep competitions were taking place, so we were all headed for the same destination and same mission; ride/drive Slickrock. The traffic was insane. I must admit that the Jeeps out-numbered the mountain bikers. Once at the trailhead parking lot, we got our bikes and gear ready. We jumped on our rides and headed down the trail. The Slickrock trail is a loop that is about eleven miles long. No big deal, right? Wrong. This trail is quite technical and is not recommended for beginners. There are places were even the best riders have to get off and push or lift their bikes over huge rock drop-offs. While we were eating up all of the Slickrock, we came across a uni-cyclist. Our jaws dropped to our handle bars in disbelief. We were having enough of a time using two tires and this guy was only on one! 'This was one crazy son-of-a...!' I thought to myself. When we made it back to the trucks at the end of the ride there was a Life-Flight helicopter, ambulance, and Park Police in the parking lot. Apparently, the uni-cycler ate sh*t and broke his leg. I guess that my thoughts were right. He was one crazy, loco, S.O.B! I just hope that he is alright! Like they say two wheels are always better than one. The trip was started by a beautiful ride, and a good introduction to what we were going to be on for the next few days. Slickrock was truly worth the crowd and seeing everyone have a good time...even the 'Jeepers.'
    pic from AdventurePlanet.com

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    Newspaper Rock

    by steph4867 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This site is famous for a large sandstone panel covered with petroglyphs that date from 1,500 to 200 years ago, from the Fremont people to the ancestral Puebloans, and finally the Utes and Navajo. The panel also includes initials and names left by early white settlers, including one J. P. Gonzales of Monticello, who herded sheep in the canyon in the early 1900s. Administered by the Bureau of Land Management's Monticello Field Office (tel. 435/587-1500), the site is located in Indian Creek Canyon, along the road to Canyonlands' Needles District, Utah 211, about 12 miles west of U.S. 191. Camping is free at a primitive campground just across the road from Newspaper Rock, with dispersed camping for about eight tents or small RVs, but no drinking water. Vault toilets are located at Newspaper Rock.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Check out the 'Whataman...

    by Tri Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    Check out the 'Whataman Formation' in Arches National Park. It's not on any guide maps, but it is the second most photographed formation in Utah (the Delicate Arch is #1). Look for it off to your left as you pass the Three Gossips in Arches National Park.

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    Early People and Dinosaurs

    by KimberlyAnn Updated May 22, 2003

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    At the information center (on Center and Main)you can pick up the self-guided "Moab Area Rock Art Auto Tour" and the "Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail" self guided walking tour. On the Rock Art Auto Tour you will see a variety of rock panels. Unfortunately, some of these have been vandalized, sporting modern day graffiti, but we still found the drive worth the effort. As you drive up the Kane Creek canyon toward the end of this driving exploration we came to a truly marvelous, up close experience with early man as we examined a huge boulder with unblemished rock art on all four sides. The figures and designs carved into the rock ranged from formative to historic Ute periods. One scene was a "birthing scene" with a presentation of a figure giving birth to a feet first baby. There were also various animal forms, centipedes, and triangular shaped humans. There is no sign at this site, and no fence or path leading to it, so if we hadn't picked up the pamphlet at the visitors center we wouldn't have be able to find this wonderful petroglyph. Also by one of the petroglyphs we saw an early "ladder" made of poles forced into a crack between two rock faces to enable the early man to climb up within the crevice.
    The Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail is 16 miles north of Moab, then another 2 miles on a bladed dirt road. The Dinosaur Trail is a ½ mile trail with numbered signposts that match the pamphlet we picked up at the information center. Here you could see fossilized bone pieces and impressions untouched in natural rock walls and boulders. We were able to see tail vertebra, leg bones, foot elements, backbone vertebra, bone fragments, ribs, and a spine. We also saw some fossilized wood and a huge packrat midden. Also in this area are the remains of an old copper mill and an old halfway stage station. These were constructed similar to the granaries made by early people in the area.

    Examples of Rock Art Drawings
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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    Hiking along Mill Creek. I...

    by worldtrekker Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Hiking along Mill Creek. I visited Moab about 12 times between 1996 - 1999 and unfortunately only found out about this hike during my last trip there in September 1999. It's really only known by locals but I'm sure the Visitor Center could help you find the trailhead which isn't that far from town. You do have to go down Millcreek Rd to get there. I don't know of any other spot in the area where you can take a dip to cool off other than in a swimming pool at your accommodation. We hiked for about an hour to get to this spot (photo). The trail continued on and we followed it for a bit before we turned around. It's an enjoyable walk through the canyon. Next time I will explore this canyon further!

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  • The best about our...

    by mariaryg Written Aug 24, 2002

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    The best about our rafting-trip was maybe the guide (a nice girl, I unfortunately don't remember her name) and the weather. We spent parts of the trip just floating in the river beside the boat, the temperature was great so there were no danger of getting ill.

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