Moab Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Moab

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    Respect dinosaur prints

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 6, 2014
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    When visiting or observing dinosaur foot tracks, do not dump a bunch of water into a dinosaur print like this lady who did not know what she was talking about. She impressed a family with a few young kids but everything she was telling them was not true. It is permitted to spray some water on the track to make is easier to identify. I have never found this to be the case but regardless, the lady with the camera poured a 12 ounce bottle of water into the print making it unidentifiable. She claimed to be a scout for NG, whatever that means. You can see the father of the children trying to scoop the water out so the children can see the print.

    A little bit of knowledge can make people dangerous.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology
    • Desert

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    Watch where you set your tent!

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 6, 2014

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    This recent trip in May 2104 we set camp early evening at ken's Lake. One in our group happen to set his tent on top of a nest of Field Mice. We didn't learn this until after 3 days when we broke down the tents and packed up. There seem to be a mother and several babies scurrying around our feet. They definitely were not shy or frightened by our presence.

    So if you have a fear of mice, look closely before you set camp. By the way, they did not feel any presence under the tent while sleeping.

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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    Severe weather in the desert

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jun 6, 2014

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    During my last trip in May 2014, our group was hiking at Fisher Towers. The weather had been on and off thunderstorms for several days. Our hike this day started out with some clouds and sun. While we were in the sun, I can see off in the distance Nimbus clouds forming with some virga. After about 1 mile of hiking I heard some thunder and stopped the group. As I contemplated the decision to turn back, the wind abruptly kicked up. Luckily the desert here is wide open and I can see the Nimbus clouds get darker and appear to move in our direction. I turn our group back quickly toward the trailhead. I passed several groups of hikers and warned of the impending weather. I felt it would be severe due to the thunder but more importantly the strength and sudden approach of the wind. They disregarded me and continued on. Unfortunate.

    We reached the trailhead as a light drizzle began. Within 10 minutes we were in the cars out to the main road driving when it hit. The heavy rain and thunder was mixed with nickel sized hail. It was so bad I pulled over thinking the windshield was going to be smashed. Within 20 minutes it passed to just be rain. That must have been a long 20 minutes for those hikers that continued on as there is no protection and if lightening were to strike Fisher Tower it likely would have splashed over onto them.

    My group learned a valuable lesson about weather and the desert.

    The photos above are shown in order as I returned the group to the cars and subsequent hail storm.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel
    • Desert

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    Magnificent 7 mountain bike route warnings

    by blueskyjohn Updated May 4, 2013

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    looking up trail. Nice straight right into fence!
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    While I love this trail, there are several issues that need to be specifically pointed out. The first is a barbwire fence that actually crosses the trail and has absolutely NO WARNINGS at all! If you are flying down the trail and happen to admire the view for a few seconds you can end up in the fence and in quite a mess. You have to dismount and open gate. No problem but a few orange ribbons tied on the wire can prevent some unnecessary injuries. This is in the Bull Run section on the trail.

    The second is a shooting range in the canyon floor of the Bull Run section. The shooting range is a boy scout camp so I should need to say much more on that. If you hear shooting, get off your bike and walk, keeping low, lol.

    Related to:
    • Cycling
    • Desert
    • Adventure Travel

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    Elusive Spirits & Bewilderment of Brews

    by goodfish Updated Feb 7, 2013

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    The no-headache happy hour

    Utah has the most bizarre, most frustrating, most confusing liquor laws in the United States; even the locals are baffled. And they change them as often as I change my socks so just about the time you figure them out, they throw you a curveball. We found the situation just a bit better on our 2011 trip than in 2004 as they'd finally gotten rid of the strange club law that required a membership to get near a mixed drink, but kept other nonsense - and added more - on the books.

    Some of the absurdities include:

    • A type of liquor license that allows mixed drinks but requires a partition - nicknamed the Zion Curtain - between customer and bartender so you can't see the bottles or mixing of the drink itself

    • Another type of license that forbids the enjoyment of a libation unless you've ordered food

    • Still another restricts to wine and beer only with the same barrier in place to hide evil taps and bottles

    • No happy hours or drink specials. Ever.

    • Spirits for sale only at state-owned liquor stores with goofy hours

    • No doubles or heavy pours. Ever. Bottles are gauged to dispense state-approved amounts.

    And so forth and so on. Knowing that locating a stress-free, post-hike adult beverage was questionable in some locations and virtually impossible in others, we picked up a cheap styro cooler and 2-week supply of goodies en route from Grand Junction and had civilized nightcaps at our rental apartment and motels. A bit of digging also turned up one local oasis in Moab where we could have beer o'clock with no baloney.

    In a nutshell: BYOB, baby.

    Related to:
    • Motorcycle
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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    Water hazards

    by goodfish Updated Apr 26, 2012

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    An unusual amount of heavy rain/flash flooding threw bit of a wrench in our hiking agenda; not that we had any trouble finding other things to do. This region only sees about 8 inches a year but when it comes there's no place for it go except rushing over rock and washes - many of which you may be on the wrong side of. Deep/narrow canyons or slots and trails/roads which cross arroyos are no places to be in a storm as, at best, you may be stranded for awhile or, at worst, dangerously trapped or washed away by a quickly rising, debris-filled torrent.

    Rain in the forecast? Choose activities in places unlikely to put you in a tight spot. High, open plateaus or peaks are also really lousy places to be in a thunderstorm so if you see lighting coming your way, make tracks for lower ground.

    The visitor center in Moab and the rangers' desks at both Arches and Canyonlands are excellent places to check current weather, trail and unpaved road conditions before heading out.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

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  • mikehanneman's Profile Photo

    The heat will kill you

    by mikehanneman Written Feb 11, 2012
    Shade and water are hard to find!

    When the normal temperature in July is 99 degrees it doesn't take make to get over heated. Take plenty of water and try to take breaks from hiking and biking. The Moab area doens't have a lot of trees and especially in and around the National Parks.

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    Pit toilets are Stinky

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 17, 2009

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    Basic pit toilet to enjoy
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    Watch where you feel you need to have some relief. The pit toilets are merely holes in the ground and they have not vent except up that hole you are looking into. The methane gases may kill you, if the smell does not make you pass out first. Not all are this bad as described, but, yes a lot are, and you do not have the privilege to choose if you are out in the wilderness.
    Yes-the methane gas is deadly if in a confined area. I did not pass out, but my weak stomach and tolerance definately let me know I was in danger. It the vent does not work sufficiently, then the problem of keeping the smell away is moot.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture

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    Gemini Bridges

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 12, 2009

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    The cliff edge is clsoer than it looks
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    Off Hwy 191 is treacherous for any vehicle; even 4WD. There are spots that can stop the progress, and the biggest problem is the climb up some sandy hills, let alone the hanging off the side of a mountain coming to or from Hwy 191 about 1/2 mile in. TAke Hwy 313 going to Canyonlands, and go the 6 miles in that way and return the same way. It is easy on the vehicle and the nerves.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Poison Spider Trail is Rough

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 12, 2009

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    Terraced drop of 15 feet
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    It is rated as the most difficult in the MOab area for Jeeps and mountain bikes. That is why they were going so slow at 2-3 MPH and bikers walking the trails. I hiked, and that is the way to go, if you want to save your transportation.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Trees being Eradicated

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 12, 2009

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    Stacked up cut wood to haul away
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    Not really a warning-but the growth of the Tamarisk trees has caused a problem for the Forest Service and BLM around here and the west. These are/were hardy trees, but now infected with beetles, and then are dying. This is causing a fire hazard, and they are cutting them down to mitigate the spread if and when that happens. These pictures are from BLM cutting down trees along the creek at Negro Bill canyon.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Arts and Culture

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    Corona Arch Hike-Not for ALL

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 12, 2009

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    Steel rope railing
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    On Potash Rd UT 297 and 3 miles north of town This is a rather difficult 3 mile hike for some; at least I thought so. You hike over a lot of rough rocks in the creek bed, some sand, but the big issue is the slickrock trek. This is the last portion of the hike, so by the time you get to that point, you do not want to turn back. Well the steel railing along the first slickrock and big angle is there so you do not slip and go downhill 50-70 feet-straight down. The next one is a climb on 40% angle straight up and the grip on the rail is necessary to make the top. I did not get a picture of that one-but should have; it is a "doozy". There even is a small ladder of old wood for ambiance.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Pick Alcohol Where You Desire Content

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 11, 2009

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    Monopoly that is anothe Gov't Rip Off

    The local liquor store is the only one in this County, or maybe State? to sell bottles of liquor and wine. I am not sure. what I was told was to go to the State Liquor Control Store to get 5% beer. So I tried. I found out all they had, and very little of it was foreign import types and in 6 packs mostly, and the prices I would guess were out of site. The whole deal was a rip off so I did not buy. You can buy 3-2% beer in grocery stores, so that is where I went, and am sure the prices are about 1/2.
    Located on 200 block S right off Main in middle of town

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Sun. Hot. Inferno. Need Water .

    by kimod74 Written Jun 23, 2006

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    Bring lots and lots and lots and lots of water. If you are going to do any hiking in this heat, bring even more water. I must have drank over a gallon a day, no joke.
    If you are afraid of the sun, wear sun block, you are gonna need it!

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    Prevent forest fires or wildfires !!!

    by Trekki Written Sep 4, 2005

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    Prevent forest fires or wildfires !!!

    Hope, the officials don’t mind that I place Smokey Bear here to warn of forest fires. But, during all my travels in US I was fascinated of the successful campaign of creating the bear as a “living figure” to give the message to prevent forest fires.

    So: wherever you are hiking around in Moab's landscape – be careful when lighting a fire.
    Don’t throw away cigarettes or matches, don’t cook with open fire when not protecting it against wind – the best of all would even be not to light a fire at all.

    It is said that 9 out of 10 wildfires are caused by humans.

    A bit off-topic, but nevertheless interesting: Smokey Bear is actually based on an orphan baby black bear, who was found after a big forest fire in 1950.
    You can read more about this, and also about wildfires, what they do, and how to prevent them on Smokey Bears Website

    The picture is a 1949 poster of Smokey Bear campaign.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Backpacking

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