Monument Valley State Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui

Best Rated Warnings and Dangers in Monument Valley State Park

  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Prevent forest fires or wildfires !!!

    by Trekki Written Sep 4, 2005

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    Hope, the officials don’t mind that I place Smokey Bear here to warn of forest fires. But, during all my travels in US I was fascinated of the successful campaign of creating the bear as a “living figure” to give the message to prevent forest fires.

    So: wherever you are in Monument Valley (and of course also outside of it) – be careful when lighting a fire.
    Moreover, as Monument Valley is not a National Park, but a Tribal Park, which includes that people live here, whose life is depending on an environment where they can herd their sheep and thus need any kind of plants !
    Don’t throw away cigarettes or matches, don’t cook with open fire when not protecting it against wind – the best of all would even be not to light a fire at all.

    It is said that 9 out of 10 wildfires are caused by humans.

    A bit off-topic, but nevertheless interesting: Smokey Bear is actually based on an orphan baby black bear, who was found after a big forest fire in 1950.
    You can read more about this, and also about wildfires, what they do, and how to prevent them on Smokey Bears Website

    The picture is a 1964 poster of Smokey Bear campaign.

    Prevent forest fires or wildfires !!!
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    Do not climb rocks – they are sacred

    by Trekki Updated Jun 23, 2007

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    Although it would be gorgeous for serious rock climbers to climb atop of these mountains and buttes, and although in several movies it seems as if the actors do – it is forbidden !

    Please remember that Monument Valley is home and living land for Navajo, who consider the mountains and mesas as sacred.

    How would you feel if people climb on top of your roof or on the churches, you pray in ?

    Thanks !

    please do not climb on them ! please do not climb on them ! please do not climb on them !
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    Stray Dogs and Dead Dogs on Road

    by jumpingnorman Updated Jun 21, 2009

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    Yes, Yaqui is absolutely right! Stray dogs are common in Monument Valley --- I also wonder why they do not keep this in check. I saw one by the new hotel, The View and the dog was not scared to approach people but not sure if it was the hotel pet? But we also saw some more dogs just outside Monument Valley in Kayenta.

    But the saddest thing is seeing two different dogs DEAD on the freeways…TWO in one day.

    The good thing is that dogs seem to be on their own solo adventures, and not in packs. But this can change easily if there becomes an alpha male…
    Hopefully, the community will find a way to look into this issue.

    Stray Dog at The View parking, Monument Valley
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    Plastic Bottles around Monument Valley

    by jumpingnorman Written Jun 21, 2009

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    This is so sad that I saw some plastic water bottles around the park. It amazes me that some people still litter, despite seeing the beauty of nature in this wondrous place.
    I do think though that there is a paucity of recycle bins in this place, and hopefully the Tribal Park will hear this. I saw the bottles mostly around the View Hotel.

    Plastic Bottle destroying nice scenery in Utah
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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Rattlesnakes – watch the "snakewood“ !

    by Trekki Written Sep 12, 2005

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    No wonder that the name of the everpresent bushes is snakewood – that’s the place where rattlesnakes are escaping from sun and heat.
    So either if you walk or are on horseback – be careful !

    However – horses know those little ones – I was always amazed how a rattlesnake is afraid of them. So riding would even keep you safer :-)

    snakewood - watch out for the rattlers !
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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Weather can change very quickly....

    by Trekki Written Sep 12, 2005

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    ... be prepared !!!
    Weather in Monument Valley area can change very quickly. Mainly in summer this can become a problem, if you are out on the valley drive. Flash floods, thunderstorms – etc. Weather forces are mightly here !

    Please consult the Visitor Center at the entrance if some “weather” is expected. If so, stay close to the center or some houses for shelter.
    Nevertheless – being in a protected place, you don’t want to miss the changing of the scenery – light and shadow, creating a mystic atmosphere !

    dramatic clouds over the buttes dramatic clouds over the buttes
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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Flood Warning & Weather

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 29, 2008

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    Heavy rain may temporarily make the road impassable for all but 4WD vehicles, but there are some areas that are flood channels when it rains and I would not take that chance with any vehicle. It was clear these area had flooded really bad and were really wide areas too. Just something to think about if you happend to come during or after a heavy rain.

    We noticed that some of the SUV vehicles were driving way too fast and dangerously. Sadly some of those looked like rentals.

    Use this link to check on weather conditions:
    Monument Valley Dine Tribal Park Weather

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  • Martinewezel's Profile Photo

    Mind your car when driving on Valley Drive!

    by Martinewezel Written May 6, 2005

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    Most of the park can only be seen from the Valley Drive. It's a 17 mile dirt road which starts at the Visitors Center. Though the man at the desk assured us it was accessible for all kind of cars, the road was very uneven and difficult for non 4 wheel drive vehicles.
    We had to turn back after 2 miles.

    It is probably kept in such a state to keep the business of the Navajo guides running, who provide 4WD jeep excursions at the Visitors Center.

    Monument Valley
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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Stray Dogs

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 29, 2008

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    While we were visiting. On two separate occasions we were approached by strays that obviously were not being fed properly. I was some what surprise to see them in such a desolated area, but as we traveled the road, you start to notice trailers dotted all over into the canyons and valleys. Some people thought maybe they were dumped off, but they were very friendly and seem accustom to approaching people for food.

    None of them had collars or tags that might indicate they have even been given proper vaccinations or identification. Each time we gave them food and I contacted the shelters that night giving them the location of the dogs. Hopefully they found them. So do be careful with your little ones to not approach just for their safety.

    I guess I was a little dismayed because I thought the respect is given to all spiritual creatures of ours especially by spiritual people, but like so many societies there are those who do not practice what they preach.

    Let everything that has breath praise the LORD! --Psalm 150:6

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    Landing runway

    by solopes Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    I made the war in Angola, and there, I felt the sensation of landing and taking off using improvised runways in compacted earth. For Fernanda, however, it has been her first situation of landing with no sights of tarmac.

    It was absolutely safe, but different. And at the end of the runway, there we had the tarmac, to protect us from dust, when stepping out of the plane. A funny experience, anyway.

    Monument Valley - USA Monument Valley - USA Monument Valley - USA Monument Valley - USA
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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    NO ROCK CLIMBING ALLOWED

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2008

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    Please no rock climbing allowed. This area is environmental protected and this is sacred land to the Dine people. Plus it is unsafe because the rocks crumble very easily to begin with. Lets keep this area safe for our future generations to enjoy.

    Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Scenic Drive Hours
    Summer (May-Sept) 6:00am - 8:30pm
    Winter (Oct - Apr) 8:00am - 4:30pm

    Camping fees - $10/night plus Entryfees $5/person
    General Admission - $5.00
    Ages 9 or under - Free

    Monument Valley UT 84536

    From Flagstaff, AZ, take U.S. Highway 89 north, 67 miles to U.S. Highway 160. Continue northeast on Route 160 for 62 miles to Kayenta, AZ. Monument Valley is 22 miles north of Kayenta Arizona, along U.S. Highway 163.

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Please obey and respect the signs

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2008

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    Please obey and respect the signs. They put these up for your safety and the safety for residences that drive these roads to get home. The loop part of the drive is one way only until you start to exit the park. Do not panic if your still in the park after hours. They have a separate road that veers to the right that exits onto the main road.

    Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Scenic Drive Hours
    Summer (May-Sept) 6:00am - 8:30pm
    Winter (Oct - Apr) 8:00am - 4:30pm

    Camping fees - $10/night plus Entryfees $5/person
    General Admission - $5.00
    Ages 9 or under - Free

    Monument Valley UT 84536

    From Flagstaff, AZ, take U.S. Highway 89 north, 67 miles to U.S. Highway 160. Continue northeast on Route 160 for 62 miles to Kayenta, AZ. Monument Valley is 22 miles north of Kayenta Arizona, along U.S. Highway 163.

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Caution Snakes

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2008

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    Please stay in marked parking areas. If you do get permission to hike or go on a tour group. Please do not reach blindly under bushes, rocks, or holes. Rattlesnakes, scorpions and spiders do inhabit this area.

    Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Scenic Drive Hours
    Summer (May-Sept) 6:00am - 8:30pm
    Winter (Oct - Apr) 8:00am - 4:30pm

    Camping fees - $10/night plus Entryfees $5/person
    General Admission - $5.00
    Ages 9 or under - Free

    Monument Valley UT 84536

    From Flagstaff, AZ, take U.S. Highway 89 north, 67 miles to U.S. Highway 160. Continue northeast on Route 160 for 62 miles to Kayenta, AZ. Monument Valley is 22 miles north of Kayenta Arizona, along U.S. Highway 163.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Never Remove Rocks, Atifacts, or Plants

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2008

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    Please never remove or disturb animals, plants, rocks, or artifacts. Please respect tribal land.

    Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Scenic Drive Hours
    Summer (May-Sept) 6:00am - 8:30pm
    Winter (Oct - Apr) 8:00am - 4:30pm

    Camping fees - $10/night plus Entryfees $5/person
    General Admission - $5.00
    Ages 9 or under - Free

    Monument Valley UT 84536

    From Flagstaff, AZ, take U.S. Highway 89 north, 67 miles to U.S. Highway 160. Continue northeast on Route 160 for 62 miles to Kayenta, AZ. Monument Valley is 22 miles north of Kayenta Arizona, along U.S. Highway 163.

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    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

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  • Karnubawax's Profile Photo

    Brace Yourself

    by Karnubawax Updated Aug 6, 2007

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    The Navajo are struggling to get by in the white man's world. They are a people whose values and culture leave them ill-equipped to deal with the rat-race that is modern America (Edward Abbey does a great job of summing up the Navajo's plight in "Desert Solitaire").

    Those who are not used to seeing severe poverty in the USA may be in for a shock. Entering Monument Valley Tribal Park, you run through a gauntlet of dirty, unpainted pressboard shacks that frankly could not look more depressing. It was all the more depressing as only a handful were open. The Navajo make no effort - and I mean NO effort - to make it pretty or inviting. Here you are confronted with the reality that you really are in a foreign land, where an entirely different set of values and priorities exist. The Navajo could charge quite a bit more to tour their lands than they do, but they'd have to pretty it up a lot, and I suppose the land can speak for itself.

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Monument Valley State Park Warnings and Dangers

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