City Sites, Salt Lake City

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Union Station

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 17, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What it looks like now, 2006! It has changed!
    3 more images

    Built in 1909 it serviced the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake City Railroad and the Oregon Short Line Railroad. It served the Salt Lake City's railroad transportation center well into the 1970s. Now, it no longer serves as a train station, yet, Salt Lake City wanted to preserve this structure. It soon became part of one their biggest outdoor malls that has over 100 shops and a Megaplex 12 theatres and Clarke Planetarium.

    It was incorporated as part of the mall and now serves many venues as renting out the the Great Hall, The Depot (Live Music Hall), and Blue Goose.

    The DEPOT is home to Utah's best indoor concert scene.

    The Blue Goose takes its name from an earlier time in railroad history. The railroad's only one-of-a-kind steam engine was painted an unusual robin's egg blue and silver, and was thus nicknamed the Blue Goose in the 1930's. The Blue Goose venue space at The DEPOT is equally unique. An intimate space with sweeping views of downtown Salt Lake City, The Blue Goose is an elegant location for smaller parties.


    Regular Hours:
    Monday-Saturday
    Sunday 10:00 am-9:00 pm
    12:00 pm-6:00 pm

    THE GATEWAY PARKING
    Parking Rates:
    1 Hour or Less: Free
    2 Hours or Less: $1.00
    3 Hours or Less $3.00
    4 Hours or Less $5.00
    Over 4 Hours $7.00

    Validations:
    Most stores will validate with your purchase. The validations are either 1 Hour Off or a Full-Day Validation.

    Parking is available in the Summer and Winter garages accessible from 200 South and 100 South and on the surface lot just north of South Temple. Parking is complimentary for the first hour and free on Sundays.

    For further information about parking, call Scott Bennett at (801) 456-7275

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Lion House

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 17, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in 1856 by Brigham Young, this structure gets it name from the stone statue on the front entrance. It once rang with the echos of family life of Brigham Young, so it now is open as a museum and public restaurant with additional rooms for banquets and receptions.

    The house was constructed with adobe blocks, a common building material during Utah's settlement period. Brigham Young, second president of the LDS Church, built the Lion House as a model for polygamous living arrangements. As many as 20 of his wives and dozens of his children lived in the house at one time. The basement contained a dining room which could accommodate 70 people. On the main floor were sitting rooms and bedrooms for wives with children. The second floor had bedrooms for childless wives and the third floor contained 20 children's bedrooms - one under each of the 20 steeply-pitched gables

    Related to:
    • Business Travel

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    The Eagle Gate

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 10, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Eagle Gate and Beehive House
    2 more images

    The Eagle Gate spans State Street in front of the Beehive House. You can see the Beehive house on the other side of it. The Eagle Gate was erected in 1859 at the entrance to Brigham Young's private farm. Eagle Gate was rebuilt circa 1900 to allow for traffic.

    The eagle at the top of the 4 legged arch weights 4000 lbs and has a wingspan of 20 feet. The original eagle was a wooden copper plated one (so probably lighter) and is now in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum located at 300 North Main Street. Its wingspan was only 16 feet.

    My dad took a picture of this in 1948 when we visited but this picture was taken in 1964 when we drove through Salt Lake City in our 1932 Plymouth.

    I must confess that before I looked it up, I thought that the bird on the top of the arch was a seagull - from the legend of the seagulls that came and ate up the grasshoppers.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    The Capitol Building

    by GracesTrips Written Jan 3, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I don't know if you can visit the capitol building. It was the holidays so I think session was out and it look to be closed. We were driving around town and came upon a great spot to take a photo.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Devereaux Mansion

    by virtualpatrick Written Jun 11, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Devereaux Mansion

    Across the Delta Center is the Devereaux Mansion. It is the first mansion built in the Salt Lake City region.

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