Zion National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by DPando
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by DPando
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by DPando

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Zion National Park

  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    Snow Canyon State Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Snow Canyon State Park is located northwest of St. George, Utah, and about 53 miles from Zion. This park features interesting, and beautiful red Navajo sandstone formations, some which are capped by an overlay of black lava rock. Hiking along the trails within the park may be enjoyed year round; however early spring and fall are particularly popular. During this time of the year you avoid the hot summers. Winters are usually mild, but there may be occasional cold spells, however, despite its name, there is rarely any snow in Snow Canyon. Within the park there is a 35-unit campground with restrooms, hot showers, some with electric hookups, and a dump station. If you have a day or two extra on your trip to Zion, I am sure that you would enjoy exploring the trails, some leading over petrified sand dunes. A number of movies have been filmed in this park including, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Electric Horseman starring Robert Redford, The Conqueror starring John Wayne and Susan Hayward. For more information visit my Snow Canyon, a Place of Many Colors VT pages.

    My Husband Hiking in Snow Canyon, Utah
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • DPando's Profile Photo

    Rocky colours

    by DPando Updated Mar 26, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Each step become more thrilling and at the same time the canyon gets higher and narrow. Water was quite cold and at some points quite deep... more than my stick, so try to avoid the less swallow waters... its easy to watch it .. because water become darkish and scarier

    Was this review helpful?

  • Shihar's Profile Photo

    St. George, Utah

    by Shihar Written Nov 15, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On your way to Zion NP from Las Vegas, you will probably drive through St. George, UT. It appears to be a charming little town. We stopped to have lunch here, but we didn't have much time to explore the town since we wanted to get to Zion

    Drving through St. George, UT
    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • WinInZion's Profile Photo

    Cinder Hill - A little known area

    by WinInZion Written Apr 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a little used part of Zion N.P., in fact I've hiked it three times without seeing anyone else. The hike is down a wash that is quite interesing but not spectacular. What I like is the area and it is an opportunity to find some petrified wood and interesting rocks.

    Note: you cannot remove anything from Zion N.P., including rocks! Collecting petrified wood outside the Park is allowed, just be reasonable so others can find some!

    The entrance to this area is off Rt 9, West of Rockville at MM 20, this is a dirt road that you take. After entering the valley the road splits and you'll go left. Continue on this road and you will climb up a fairly steep rough part. Be Careful! At the top is a large area of slickrock that is neat to hike about and search for the pertrifed wood and rocks, you are not in the Park. Great views!

    Continuing on the rough road will take you to a gate into Zion N.P. Enter the Park and follow the trail to the wash. Hiking down this will take you all the way to Coal pits wash. It's not strenuos and is very enjoyable. My friends commented on how quiet it is up here. Huge petrified logs are laying about and sticking out of the sides.

    My wife, Yo, with a piece of petrified wood Up on the slickrock

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Zion in winter

    by goingsolo Updated Apr 15, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Zion is located in southern Utah- an area which receives little snowfall. But it does snow at times in Utah's Dixie, particularly in the higher elevations. In late November. there was a good deal of snow on the rock above the Zion Scenic Drive.

    I enjoyed Zion in winter far more than in the summer. I find heat oppressive and nearly 100 degree temps are not ideal for hiking. The crowds and shuttle bus take some of the thrill out of it for me as well. In the winter, there are few visitors traveling beneat the canyon walls and bright blue sky. The shuttle bus ceases operation and those who choose to visit are free to drive the park road in its entirety.

    On this November day, I only saw a couple of people at some of the early stops along the park road. After that, it was colorful walls, snow and solitude. The weather was a balmy 25 degreess, which was 40 degrees warmer than when I began the day near Bryce Canyon. Its quite a change from the heat and noise of summer.

    Zion National Park
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    People wading in the Zion Narrows

    by goingsolo Updated Jun 20, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many people make the 18 mile trek through the Narrows. This is not an ordinary hike. The water is cold throughout the year, and near freezing in the winter. There are possible flash floods any time of the year, which can occur without warning.

    Zion Narrows

    Was this review helpful?

  • lazyman_1's Profile Photo

    Coral Pink Sand Dunes

    by lazyman_1 Written Oct 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located about 20 minutes from Zion, i didn't really know what to expect. The sand dunes were rather interesting in my opinion as they were actually pink! we watched as a bunch of people drove up, in and around the sand dunes on their 4x4's, looked like loads of fun. There is an entrance fee to the park but if all you want is a look then there is a parking area off to the left before you ever reach the entrance gate. From here you can park, walk up the small embankment and the out onto the dunes.

    Was this review helpful?

  • WinInZion's Profile Photo

    East Mesa Trail

    by WinInZion Written Oct 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We wanted to do something different and chose the East Mesa Trail. This little used trail crosses a mesa and takes you to Observation Pt. The hike is 6 miles R/T, there is some change in altitude but not like climbing from the canyon floor.

    On this hike you'll have views to the pink cliffs by Cedar Breaks and then into Mystery Canyon. A little further on you start to look into the main canyon of Zion. The hike ends at Observation Pt, overlooking
    Angel's Landing and other features of Zion Canyon.

    Of note: The trailhead is easily accessible by 4WD, if you're taking a car stop where the road turns rocky. From that point on we encountered some deep mud and were glad to have our Jeep. You only need to walk about .2 of a mile to the trailhead from where you stop.

    This is the "easy" way to Observ. Pt., still took some effort. I've not done the point from the other trail by Weeping Rock. That trail is 4 miles each way and a steeper climb, supposed to be much more scenic. I liked the solitude of not seeing anyone for the entire hike, both ways.

    Looking down canyon, Angel's Landing below Lookind to Big Bend
    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • WinInZion's Profile Photo

    Coal Pits Wash - Desert Venue

    by WinInZion Updated Apr 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visiting the lush Zion Canyon is always a great. But a few miles west of the entrance is a pretty neat desert hike. You can make this a 2 day backpack or just go enjoy the scenery on a shorter day hike.
    I've not gone all the way in, usually make it about 1 1/2 hrs and turn around.

    You'll see the parking area along RT 9 just west of Rockville, on the right. Parking has never been a problem, if it's muddy you can park just off the hiway.

    The trail is really flat and at worst could be muddy. Please stay on the trail as the crust is very delicate. You will eventually come to a split in the wash. Off to the right is Scoggins Wash, a very pretty alternative. Continuing up Coal Pits you'll come to a rocky area with some small waterfalls.

    Pick up one of the Zion guides to hiking and you'll see this hike as well as Huber Wash and the Chinle Trail.

    April 10, 2005 at one of the falls

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Zion Canyon

    by goingsolo Updated Jan 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The view of Zion Canyon, as seen from the Zion Overlook Trail. After driving along the winding entrance road past colorful high cliff walls, the expansive view of the lush canyon floor is a spectacular sight.

    Zion National Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Zion in isolation

    by goingsolo Updated Jan 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I don't know why I didn't enjoy Zion more during my first visit. Perhaps it was the heat and the crowds. On this last day of November its a balmy 25 degrees (that's fahrenheit), the crowds are gone, the shuttle is closed to operations and the park road remains open to the few tourists that choose to sightsee during this period of the year. This is Zion in solitude and the phrase "heaven on earth" has never rang so true.

    Zion National Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Gardens of Eden

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 22, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Zion's rock alcoves and running water provide for greenery in unexpected locations. In several areas, including near Emerald Pools and Weeping Rock, you will find hanging gardens growing in the summertime (not illustrated too well by this wintry photo), nurtured by the springs. These hidden garden locations are yet another reason why Zion is considered paradise of earth

    Zion National Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Get off the beaten path

    by goingsolo Updated Jun 20, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The best way to experience Zion is to get off the main path. Most visitors, myself included, take the shuttle through the park, stopping at the crowded stops along the way. Because of this, Zion didn't "wow" me in the way that most National Parks have.

    Zion National Park occupies 229 square miles. Zion Scenic drive, the park's "main drag" is only 6.6 miles long. The majority of the park is backcountry and a lot is either unexplored or rarely seen. I've been told that there are numerous small canyons in the remote areas of Zion as well.

    Instead of seeing the popular sites, take a hike through the backcountry or head up to Kolob Canyons in the northwest section of Zion.

    Zion National Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Dawn in the park

    by goingsolo Updated Jan 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's 6 a.m and I'm waiting for the sun to rise because I don't want to travel through the Zion Mt. Carmel tunnel in the dark. Its a nice morning with a slight chill in the air. The dawn is slowly breaking over the sandstone pillars outside the balcony where I sit.

    The magic of some moments cannot be captured on film or even in words. The serenity of a morning such as this is one of them. The stillness interrupted only by the chirping of early rising birds, who are as eager as I am for the day to begin. The slight whisper of the wind as it blows through the canyon, dew on the grass coming to light as the day emerges are all captured in my mind. The memory of standing on shifting wooden planks on the lodge balcony waiting to hit the road for a new day's adventure.

    Zion Mt Carmel Highway

    Was this review helpful?

  • hellmom629's Profile Photo

    get up early

    by hellmom629 Written Sep 7, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    visiting in August , we found that if we rose at 4am and hit the trails that the hiking was so cool and comfortable. when we were coming off the mountains at 11am the sun was at its peak and we felt sorry for the hikers just starting.

    then you can go home and have a lovely nap and a swim. we found this was the best way to experience Zion without the hordes.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Zion National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

116 travelers online now

Comments

Zion National Park Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Zion National Park off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Zion National Park sightseeing.

View all Zion National Park hotels