Chantilly Things to Do

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    by Yaqui
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    by Yaqui
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    "Alone in Dixie"

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    The plaque reads: At the time of the Civil War, the farms of Sully and Little Sully (no longer standing) were the homes of the Barlow and Haight families respectively. These families, connected by marriage, had come to Virginia from Dutchess County, New York, and found themselves Unionists in a secessionist neighborhood. After the men fled to avoid capture, the women of Sully operated both farms for most of the war. Maria Barlow wrote to family members in New York that "we out here alone in Dixie have no appointed place of worship no gathering together for any purpose but fighting. ... If any place sinks from weight of sin surely Virginia must."

    On September 1, 1862, Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson fought Federal Gen. John Pope's retreating army at the Battle of Ox Hill (Chantilly), five miles east of Sully, after the Second Battle of Manassas. The farms were reportedly used as hospitals. In December 1862, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry, returning from his "Christmas Raid" on Burke Station, stopped here and rested his men. Stuart, as well as Gens. Wade Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee, ate breakfast in the house and left Union wounded behind in Maria Barlow's care.

    As the war continued, Confederate partisans fought on Sully lands. Confederate Col. John S. Mosby frequented the farms here, searching for supplies but also hoping to capture the men of the family. Neighbor Henry Ryer, reminiscing about the raids, called Mosby a "regular dare-devil."

    Henry Lee I patented the 3,000 acres that became Sully in 1725. His grandson, Richard Bland Lee, built the present Federal-style house in 1794, served in the Virginia House of Delegates, and was also the first Congressman from Northern Virginia. Richard Bland Lee was the brother of the Revolutionary War Hero "Light Horse" Harry Lee and the uncle of Robert E. Lee. Sully remained in the Lee family until 1838.

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    Sully Farm Vistor Center & Tour

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    I suggest to really learn about the home is take the tour. They take you practically through the house. The lovely lady who gave us a tour was awesome. She knew so much about the family and its history. We enjoyed it so much. A++

    House Tours: Guided tours of the main house given on the hour. Open daily from 11am-4pm, closed Tuesdays. Last tour at 4pm. January, February and Holidays when open, last tour is 3:00pm.

    Cost: $7/Adult, $6/Student (16+), $5/Senior (age 65 or older ), and $5/Youth (5-15), per tour. Save by taking both tours on the same day, approximately two hours in length: $9/Adult, $8/Student, $7/Senior and youth.

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    Slave Quarters

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    Aside from there having been "every necessary house for labourers" with "brick or stone chimnies" at Sully, little is known about the accommodations that Lee provided enslaved African-Americans. Archeological excavations along the South Lane have recovered, remnants from a small cluster of buildings. Their particular configuration, along with artifacts from the site, corresponds to known information about slave dwellings on other eighteenth century Virginia plantations, and suggests that enslaved African-Americans occupied these structures. Together the log dwelling (built on top of the eighteenth-century "footprint"), sample garden and communal yard comprise a representative quarter, constructed in 2000 to provide visitors a more comprehensive view ofthe enslaved African-American presence at Sully.

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    Covered Way

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    Using the original stone supports, the covered way was restored in 1975 to its early appearance. This feature provided a sheltered link between the laundry and kitchen and the main house. An early 18th century writer observed that the practice ofhaving a detached kitchen kept Virginia dwellings "more cool and Sweet."

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    Laundry & Kitchen

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    "The kitchen ...is a finer one than is in twenty miles square and it is in fact a Kitchen and Laundry with very handsom chimney with cranes in them. " -Stephen Collins, September, 1794. A massive stone chimney with double fireplaces divides this 1794 structure. Original cranes for hanging pots and cooking utensils extend across the stone hearths. Daily a skilled African-American cook prepared all the family meals with foods ranging from baked breads, roasted meats and fowl, boiled vegetables and, for festive occasions, elaborate pies, cakes and jellies.

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    Smoke House & Well

    by Yaqui Written Jun 18, 2011

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    The "well in the kitchen yard" provided water for drinking, cooking, washing linens' and clothing, and cleaning. To accomplish these tasks every day, enslaved African-Americans drew bucket after bucket of water, then hauled the heavy pails wherever they were needed. The well measures 36 feet deep. Please keep off the well cover.

    A contemporary of the main house, this structure has the same flush bead siding. Salted meats suspended from wooden pegs in the crossbeams were smoked for several weeks to cure or preserve them. Barrels containing salted pork or herring may have been stored here until the contents, along with a portion of cornmeal, were distributed as rations to slaves.

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    Stone Dairy 1801

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    "Our dairy is an elegant apartment and answers our most sanguine expectations. " -Richard Bland Lee, June 5, 1802. Built about 1801, this building housed the Lee's dairy operations. The red Seneca sandstone structure is embellished with galleting, a decorative technique using stone chips set into mortar. Two-foot thick stone walls ensured a cool and constant temperature. On the north end of the building, cold underground water filled the vats recessed in the floor. Earthenware pans of milk and crocks of barrel-churned butter were cooled in the dairy. A dairy annex was built and connected through the east wall for additional dairy space. The south doorway leads to a two-story work or dwelling space, possibly for domestic servants or an overseer. A fireplace is located on each level. South side not open for view.

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    Log Schoolhouse

    by Yaqui Written Jun 18, 2011

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    This structure was moved to Sully in the 1960's for preservation. This log building dates from the first half of the nineteenth century and was originally a schoolhouse near Haymarket, Virginia.

    Admissions, Gift Shop, and Restrooms are located here.

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    The Sully Farm 1794

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 18, 2011

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    The Sully Farm, is a late 18th century home of Richard Bland Lee. The grounds and associated buildings reflect an earlier era when Lee was Northern Virginia's first congressman and an uncle of Robert E. Lee. He and his wife, Elizabeth Collins Lee, lived here with their children from 1794 to 1811. John and Alice, Ludwell and Nancy and their children, along with some thirty other enslaved African-Americans, overseers and tenant farmers, also resided here during that time. Like other progressive farmers of his day, Lee used the labor of his slaves to transform the land from a tobacco plantation to a diversified crop farm. During his ownership the estate included extensive fields ofgrains and grasses, pasture for livestock, orchards, two acre garden and acres ofwoods.

    Situated north of Cain's Branch, Sully consists offive surviving original buildings (the "dwelling house" and four small "houses" or "offices"), two transplanted historic structures, representative gardens and slave quarters and archeological sites. Together they give a multi faceted view ofthe customs and culture ofrural north.em Virginians in the early years of our nation. Courtesy of Fairfax Co. Park Authority

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    An up and coming aerospace museum

    by etfromnc Updated Aug 26, 2010

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    The Udvar-Hazy Center is a companion facility to the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in DC. It is already larger than the NASM and it is not yet seven years old. Being an Air Force retiree, I think that I still prefer the Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio but if you have a very long layover at Dulles IAP, I cannot think of a better way to spend those otherwise wasted hours. (I had a three hour layover at Dulles last month and it only took seconds to decide that I did not have time for a visit.) There are nearly 150 aircraft on display, including spacecraft such as the space shuttle Enterprise but my favorite airplane is the P-61, a late World War II fighter-pursuit plane which really never got into the war because of its late development. It was a very large twin engine plane, about the size of a medium bomber. Some were deployed to the South Pacific late in 1944 but they never really became the force they might have become had they been developed sooner. Designed for operations at night and in bad weather, the Black Widow, its official nickname, was probably used as much for weather reconnaisance and hurricane patrol as for fighting. Only a few were made and the Udvar-Hazy Center has proudly displayed a prime example since 2006.
    Admission, as with all the Smithsonian museums, is free, but in this case, if you drive it will cost $15 to park.

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    Sully Plantation

    by Tom_Fields Written Aug 5, 2007

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    The Sully Plantation home
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    Completed in 1799, this was the home of Richard Bland Lee and his wife Elizabeth. Lee was Northern Virginia's first representative in the new Congress. He was also the uncle of General Robert E. Lee.

    Lee sold the house in 1811. It changed hands a number of times. The Fairfax County Park Authority bought the property in 1959, and made it into a historic park.

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    Richard Bland Lee (Robert E. Lee's Uncle)

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    Sully Plantation from the county website
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    Richard Bland Lee (January 20, 1761–March 12, 1827) was a planter, jurist, and politician from Fairfax County, Virginia.

    Richard was the son of Maj. Gen. Henry Lee II (1730-1787) of “Leesylvania” and, Lucy Grymes (1734-1792) the "Lowland Beauty".

    Richard was the younger brother of Maj. Gen. Henry Lee III. (1756-1818).

    I read about his house in the Washington Post - the house is now on the grounds of Dulles airport. I found that Sully was the country home of Richard Bland and Elizabeth Collins and was built in 1794 on what was originally a 3,111 acre tract between Cub and Flatlick Runs, then part of Loudoun County, Virginia.

    I wanted to go, but something interferred with my visit, and I have never been. Maybe someday I will get back there. It is a little difficult to get to.

    Coming from Dulles Airport, Herndon, or Leesburg
    Pass Sully entrance (no left turns allowed), continue .2 miles in right lane. Take Route 50 (Winchester/Fairfax) exit, and the Rt. 50 East ramp. Do not merge onto Rt. 50 East. Stay in exit ramp lane to immediate right exit (you will be going under Rt. 28) to "North 28 Dulles Airport" exit. Merge onto Rt. 28 northbound and proceed approx. .6 miles to Sully entrance on right.

    Open: Daily 11am - 4pm, except closed Tuesdays and some holidays, check with the site.

    House Tours: Guided tours of the main house given on the hour. January and February, last tour is 3:00pm, closed Tuesdays

    Forgotten Road Tours: Outside walking tour of the original outbuildings and slave quarter given at 2pm through mid-November. Mid-November through February by reservation only. Canceled if inclement weather and code red weather conditions, call site to confirm tour status.

    Cost: $5/Adult, $4/Student (16+), $3/Senior (60+), and child (5-15), per tour. Cost for both tours, approximately two hours in length, is only $2 more: $7/Adult, $6/Student, $5/Senior and child. Admission to the grounds is free.

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    Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of Air & Space Museum

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Mar 2, 2007

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    Hanger
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    My dad keeps wanting to come here, but we finally went without him.

    Hours:
    10:00 am - 5:30 pm

    Free but public parking is $12

    The James S. McDonnell Space Hangar opened in November 2004 and displays hundreds of famous spacecraft, rockets, satellites and space-related small artifacts. The centerpiece of the space hangar is the Space Shuttle Enterprise. Other space artifacts include the Gemini VII space capsule; the Mobile Quarantine Unit used upon the return of the Apollo 11 crew; and a Redstone rocket.

    In addition, the Donald D. Engen Observation Tower provides an excellent location from which visitors can watch air traffic at Dulles Airport.

    The Center also offers an IMAX® Theater; flight simulators; food service; a museum store; free docent tours; daily educational programs; and school group tours and activities are available.

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    Smithsonian Air and Space Museum

    by Tom_Fields Written Nov 26, 2006

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    The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center
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    The Air and Space Museum on the National Mall is full. So the Smithsonian has expanded the facility to this new location, out in Chantilly. Bigger than the other one, with plenty of room to grow, this museum is called America's Hangar. Its collection of aircraft, missiles, satellites, and memorabilia is larger than the original. It's well worth the drive from Washington.

    The new facility is named for Steven F. Udvar-Hazy, a Hungarian immigrant who made his fortune in the airline business, and whose generous donation made it all possible.

    The Boeing Aviation Hangar features aircraft from both World Wars, the Cold War, the Middle Eastern conflicts, plus several airliners and a large number of pleasure planes. The new James S. McDonnell Space Hangar has the space shuttle Enterprise, satellites, manned spacecraft, missiles, rocket engines, and much more. In addition, the Engen Observation Tower provides outstanding views of Dulles Airport and the surrounding countryside (be prepared to wait awhile to go up there). For any aviation buff, this is a must-see.

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    Fair Oaks Shopping Center (MALL)

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 21, 2006

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    Larry at the Fair Oaks Mall in Chantilly

    This is a really large mall. Two stories tall with lots of shops and eateries. My husband and I happened to stumble across this mall, due to the fact there was no signs letting you know...MALL ahead.
    It is located off Route 50 East in Chantilly, near the I-495 beltway.

    There is a Lords & Taylor, New York & Co., Claire's boutique, GAP, Pottery Barn, Kids Pottery Barn, Spencer's Gifts, Tobacco Store, just to name a few...

    There are lots of places to eat including lots of Coffee shops and ice cream shops. We stopped at "Java Hut" and got Italian Ice Cream. I got a coconut and my husband got a pineapple..they were very good. They were called Gelattos..very nice..alittle expensive..
    2 small ones with no drinks cost $6.25..but they were very good.

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