Monticello, Charlottesville

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  • jel118981's Profile Photo

    Monticello

    by jel118981 Written Oct 5, 2005
    The home of Thomas Jefferson
    4 more images

    Monticello was the home of Thomas Jefferson, there you can visit the house, gardens and platation.
    After purchasing tickets you´re transportated in a shuttle bus from the ticket office to the house.
    You know that in the visitor information is the one of the few places where you can get 2$bills? Ask for one of them when you pay your ticket!!

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    Monticello

    by HotSpotJ Written Jun 5, 2005
    Monticello

    Monticello is the famous home of Thomas Jefferson, the 3rd President of the United States, the author of the Declaration of Independance, and the designer of the Univeristy of Virginia. Monticello means "little mountain" in Italian, as it is built on top of a mountain with amazing views of the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains. The intracacies of the estate prove that Jefferson was a man far ahead of his times, with pulley systems and elevators designed to make living more efficient. The gardens here are fabulous, as is the history of the grounds and the artifacts inside this historic landmark. A must visit if you travel in the Charlottesville area.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Monticello Gardens

    by Ewingjr98 Written Sep 15, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jefferson's Monticello Gardens

    Throughout his plantation, Jefferson grew dozens of crops from corn and peas to clover and oats. He raised sheep, hogs, and cattle. For many years, his mills provided cornmeal and flour to the local area. For many years his primary crop on his four farms (Monticello, Shadwell, Tufton, and Lego) was tobacco until his research showed him the damage it did to the soil.

    At the vegetable gardens near the main house, Jefferson experimented with some 330 varieties of vegetables and many fruits. He also tried grapes for wine, berries, and other foods unique to this area of Virginia.

    Jefferson did have about 200 slaves, most of which were inherited from his father and father-in-law. This seems to contradict Jefferson famous quote in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal" but even modern researchers admit that he could never quite come to terms with this dilemma.

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    Monticello

    by HokieinNC Written Jul 5, 2004

    This is cliché, but if you visit Charlottesville, you really should consider Monticello, a ''must see". A presidential home could be considered "boring" - my wife was bored to tears at Ash Lawn (home of James Monroe), but Thomas Jefferson really was one of the most interesting men in our country's short history and his "little mountain" a fascinating place unlike any you have ever seen.

    The house itself had many intricacies that were different than houses in that time, the gardens are beautiful, and overall gives a rare peek into the operation of a mountain plantation in the early 1800's. I won't spoil it for you - it really is a wonderful place.

    My ONLY complaint is the tour. While the people leading the tours are very knowledgeable, you feel like a herd of cattle being led through the house. So, you have a choice - listen to the guide, or soak in the wonderful artifacts and decorations around the house. I chose the latter. You really don't have enough time to spend what you need in the house. Granted, Monticello is very popular so "people control" is warranted. But regardless, it does cheapen the experience. Next time, I may go through the house twice.

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    My favorite place ...

    by shrimp56 Updated Nov 20, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kitchen Garden at Monticello

    ... is the Monticello kitchen garden. I've visited Monticello 3 times and it's fun to see what is growing in the garden! They have worked hard to include only those items that would have been grown when Jefferson was alive.

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    • Archeology

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  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Monticello

    by seagoingJLW Written Apr 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monticello and garden

    Before you visit the estate, go to the Monticello Visitors Center located on Rte 20 near I 64. There is a free movie: "Thomas Jefferson: the Pursuit of Liberty" in addition to exhibits and information.

    Monticello is Thomas Jefferson's masterpiece. For more than 40 years he designed, redesigned, built and rebuilt it. Guided tours, limited to 25 people and lasting 30 minutes, run every 4 to 5 minutes.

    The gardens were not only a showplace, but a source of food. There are guided tours of the gardens and grounds from April 1 through October 31.

    About 10 years after the former President's death in 1826, Uriah P. Levy purchased Jefferson's run down estate, that was virtually in ruin. He began a long and costly program of renovation and restoration, including the purchase of an additional 2,500 acres adjoining the historic property. After Levy's death in 1862, his will directed that Monticello - the house and property - be left "to the people of the United States."

    Located in the Virginia Piedmont, Monticello is about two miles southeast of Charlottesville and approximately 125 miles from Washington, D.C.; 110 miles from Williamsburg, Virginia; and 70 miles from Richmond, Virginia.

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  • steph4867's Profile Photo

    Monticello

    by steph4867 Written Mar 13, 2003
    Monticello

    Pronounced "Mon-ti-chel-lo," the home Thomas Jefferson built over 40 years from 1769 to 1809 is a highlight of any visit to Virginia. This architectural masterpiece was the first Virginia plantation manse to sit atop a mountain rather than beside a river. Because it was British, Jefferson rejected the Georgian architecture that characterized his time, opting instead for the 16th-century Italian style of Andrea Palladio. Later, during his 5-year term as minister to France, he was influenced by the homes of nobles at the court of Louis XVI, and after returning home in 1789, he enlarged Monticello, incorporating features of the Parisian buildings he so admired.

    Today the house has been restored as closely as possible to its appearance during Jefferson's retirement years. Jefferson or his family owned nearly all its furniture and other household objects. The garden has been extended to its original 1,000-foot length, and Mulberry Row--where slaves and free artisans lived and labored in light industrial shops such as a joinery, smokehouse-dairy, blacksmith shop-nailery, and carpenter's shop--has been excavated. Guided tours of the gardens and Mulberry Row are available from April through October.

    Jefferson's grave is in the family burial ground, which is still in use. After visiting the graveyard, you can take a shuttle bus to the visitor parking lot or walk through the woods via a delightful path. There is a lovely wooded picnic area with tables and grills on the premises, and, in summer, lunch fare can be purchased.

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    Monticello Gardens

    by basstbn Written Feb 25, 2003
    Allison and Elizabeth enjoy the flowers.

    Thomas Jefferson took far more than a passive interest in the workings of the plantation. He experimented with varieties of plants, and imported some new foods and flowers from France on his travels. Gardeners still tend his vegetable gardens and keep the grounds beautiful with flowers.

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    Monticello - The Home of Thomas Jefferson

    by basstbn Written Feb 25, 2003
    Jefferson said that Monticello had several fronts.

    Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the USA was a man of many talents. Not only was he a noted statesman and the writer of the Declaration of Independence, he founded the University of Virginia, was a historian, plantation owner, inventor of sorts, and architect. Jefferson himself designed Monticello in the Roman neoclassical style.

    The building was begun in 1769 and finished (for the most part) in 1784. Work on a new design for enlarging the house began in 1796 and finished in 1809.

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  • Laserrob76's Profile Photo

    Visit the Thomas Jefferson...

    by Laserrob76 Written Sep 2, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit the Thomas Jefferson House Monticello
    Jefferson began constructing Monticello in 1768. He redesigned it in 1789 after he returned from France. After his second term of President he spent more time at Monticello...

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  • Easty's Profile Photo

    Montecello Estate: This was...

    by Easty Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Montecello Estate: This was the home of Thomas Jefferson. The estate itself was magnificent. It is a well kept landmark. The house is in great shape and it is worth the tour. The grounds are very beautiful as well. The garden was spectacular. Located on top of a hill, Monticello has a great panaramic view of the area.

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    You must visit Monticello,...

    by Beachdave Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You must visit Monticello, home of Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. Explore Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's mountaintop home, gardens, and plantation. Monticello is owned and operated by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation in Charlottesville, Virginia
    Monticello is the autobiographical masterpiece of Thomas Jefferson, designed and redesigned and built and rebuilt for more than forty years. Jefferson described the house as his 'essay in architecture,' but today it is recognized as an international treasure. Monticello is the only house in America on the United Nations' prestigious World Heritage List of sites that must be protected at all costs.

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  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the Monticello grounds

    by shrimp56 Updated Nov 20, 2003

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    spring begins at Monticello

    We were a little early for anything except some daffodils -- the grounds were still beautiful, overlooking, as they do, the Virginia countryside.

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  • basstbn's Profile Photo

    Monticello outbuildings

    by basstbn Written Feb 25, 2003
    Kitchen

    Much of the work took place in the buildings away from the main house. This kitchen is one interesting example.

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    Monticello Grounds

    by basstbn Written Feb 25, 2003
    A section of the grounds

    Besides the house itself, Monticello's grounds and numerous outbuildings are worthy of visit. Allow yourself plenty of time for a relaxing stroll.

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