Monticello, Charlottesville

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  • Monticello
    by Yaqui
  • Monticello
    by Ewingjr98
  • Jefferson's Grave
    Jefferson's Grave
    by apbeaches
  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Jefferson & Monticello

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 16, 2011

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    Monticello was the home of Thomas Jefferson for most of his life. Thomas Jefferson was born in 1743 and died on July 4 1826. He was America’s Third President of the United States, Congressman, Author of the Declaration of Independence, Governor of Virginia 1779-1781, US Secretary of State, Minister to France, Founder of University of Virginia, Collector of literature, and architect. He inherited the Monticello’s by his Father Peter. By 1768 construction began and Monticello would be Jefferson’s delight who would remodeled it over the forty year period he lived there. This would be his home and where he raised his family. It is also where his six children were born and where 4 four of them died along with Jefferson and his wife.

    Jefferson's unique design for Monticello brought together spaces for working, living, and storage beneath the main house, terraces, and pavilions. These spaces included a wash house, carriage bays, an ice house, tow privies, a wine cellars, a kitchen, a smokehouse, a dairy, and three rooms for slaves. These dependencies or area for domestic work, served as points of intersection between Jefferson's family and enslaved people, and were instrumental to the functioning of the house. The were concealed in the hillside to avoid obstructing the landscape around the house.

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    Monticello

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 15, 2006

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    Monticello
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    Thomas Jefferson: author of the Declaration of Independence, Third President of the United States, founder of the University of Virginia. Some of his lesser roles in the shaping of America include Vice President, Governor of Virginia, minister to France, and Secretary of State. He was truly a man who enjoyed and flourished in a world of politics. Even less known about Jefferson is that he was a great architect, a lover of art and philosophy, a gardener, and an amateur astronomer.

    A visit to Monticello, Jefferson's home outside of Charlottesville, will reveal all of these sides of this great American. He inherited 5,000 acres, upon which he designed and built his great mansion from 1768 to 1808. The house is full of art pieces such as busts of philosophers Francis Bacon and John Locke. There are also dozens of unique inventions throughout Monticello like his "polygraph" used to copy letters. The Library of Congress got its start at Monticello when Jefferson donated his personal 7000-book library to the American people. Finally, the house is surrounded by 1000 acres of fields and gardens where Jefferson's 150 slaves grew an amazing variety of crops.

    Unfortunately photos are not allowed inside the mansion.

    Tours of Jefferson's Monticello home are available every day of the year: $13.00 per adult and $6.00 per child. Visiting hours are 0800-1700 March through October and 0900-1630 November through February.

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    Tours of Monticello

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 16, 2011

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    Daily, year-round

    Tours run throughout the day.

    Get an intimate look at the extraordinary house Thomas Jefferson built and furnished for himself and his family. See the furnishings, art, books, gadgets and other objects that reveal Jefferson's unique mind. The guided House Tour covers the rooms on Monticello's first floor and lasts about 35 minutes.

    Also included:

    Plantation Community Tour
    Gardens and Grounds Tour (April-October)
    Seasonal Mountaintop Activity Center
    Exhibitions, Film, and Griffin Discovery Room at the Visitor Center
    Group Tours: Special rates are available for adult groups of 25 or more, and for youth/student groups. Call 434-984-9880 for more information and to make reservations.

    House Tour Schedule Tours are scheduled to run throughout the day, and last approximately 35 minutes.

    Even if you do not take any of the extensive tours, this tour is wonderful. To take a tour, you must get a ticket and a bus takes up to the house.

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    Monticello -- Jefferson's Grave site

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 15, 2006

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    Jefferson family cemetery
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    Thomas Jefferson died on the 4th of July 1826 which was the 50th anniversary of the signing of his Declaration of Independence, and it was the very same day that another founding father -- John Adams -- passed away. Jefferson is buried at a small family cemetery near the mansion at Monticello. His grave site is marked by a large obelisk on the north edge of the fenced-in yard. Jefferson wrote his own epitaph which reads "Author of the Declaration of American Independence, Of the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom, and Father of the University of Virginia.

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    Monticello

    by Hopkid Written Apr 26, 2006

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    Certainly the must-do attraction, Monticello was the home of Thomas Jefferson, author of the U.S. Declaration of Independence and third president. It was designed and built by the man himself and incorporates many architectural elements that Jefferson was so fond of, most notably the dome concept. You can see other examples of his love for the dome in other structures he designed including the Rotunda on the campus of the Univeristy of Virginia (which he founded BTW) and the capitol building in Richmond.

    The setting of Jefferson's home is striking in that it sits on top of a mountain with sweeping views over the foothills of the Piedmont and the Blue Ridge Mountains beyond to the west. It was from here that Jefferson could observe the construction of UVA through a telescope. The univeristy is still visible from the home today. The gardens around the home are well-maintained and many of the trees that were planted during Jefferson's lifetime are still alive and well. Spring is especially nice with lots of flowers and trees in bloom.

    Tickets for the home tour can be purchsed down the hill near the parking lot. The ticket will have a time at which your tour will gather at the top of the hill and enter the home. Summer months and weekends can get very busy so it is best to arrive as early as possible to avoid a long wait for your assigned tour time. A shuttle bus will take you to the top of the hill. You are free to explore the outside grounds before and after the tour at your leisure. Note that there are no food vendors on the top of the hill and the only food is a small sandwich/snack shop near the ticket office at the bottom of the hill. Feel free to bring a picnic or go back down the hill to Historic Michie Tavern for their all-you-can eat southern buffet (11:30-3:30pm daily).

    Be sure to take the scenic walk down the hill back to the parking lot and check out the Jefferson family cemetery which includes the grave of the man himself.

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    monticello

    by doug48 Updated Nov 3, 2006

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    monticello

    monticello was the home of thomas jefferson, the third president of the united states. born in 1743 jefferson was a surveyor, planter, and intellectual. a commited francophile he was the minister to france in 1785. he was the author of the declaration of independence which had great impact on the french revolution. jefferson was an architect, inventor, and one of america's great statesmen. he was the founder and architect of the university of virginia. his contributions to the foundation of american society can not be summarized in this short tip. monticello is a must see site when in the charlottesville area. a good web site to visit to learn more about thomas jefferson is http:www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/

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    Monticello: Exterior

    by von.otter Updated Oct 31, 2009

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    Monticello, Western Facade, May 2009
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    “And our own dear Monticello, where nature has spread so rich a mantel under the eye, mountains, forests, rocks, rivers. With what majesty do we there ride above the storms! How sublime to look down into the workhouse of nature, to see her clouds, hail, snow, rain, thunder, all fabricated at our feet! And the glorious Sun, when rising as if out of a distant water, just gilding the tops of the mountains, and giving life to all nature!”
    —from a letter, dated 12.October.1786, by Thomas Jefferson to Maria Cosway, Jefferson’s Continental romance while he was Minister to France

    STORMY WEATHER Jefferson knew his beloved Monticello with rain and clouds, and now we do too.

    In the above quoted letter, Jefferson uses the royal we; it could not be ‘our dear Monticello’ because Mrs. Cosway, the Italian-Anglo wife of the well-known and sought-after miniature portrait painter Richard Cosway, had never visited Monticello. Maria Louisa Caterina Cecilia Hadfield Cosway was an accomplished artist as well as a composer, musician and society hostess.

    For as much as the Founding Fathers, Jefferson included, disliked the Old World, that is where they turned for all their inspiration, for government and architecture. Jefferson used the style and form of Ancient Rome’s glorious Pantheon as the model for his home. Even its name comes from an Old World language. In Italian the names means little mountain; Jefferson was calling his plantation Monticello as early as August 1767.

    The lesser-known eastern façade of Monticello (see photo #4) is the carriage entrance; it is where Jefferson’s guests would arrive and the mansion; and it is where we entered for our house tour. The portico of the eastern facade has a compass rose on its ceiling (see photo #5). It is directly connected to a weather vane, designed by Jefferson, that records the weather conditions at Monticello. Jefferson and others could look out the windows and see the wind’s direction and record it without leaving the house. The weather vane is still in operation.

    Americans carry around a portrait of Monticello’s western façade; it is on the U.S. nickel’s reverse side. Jefferson chose to direct this part of the house in this direction as a gesture to the nation’s future in the west.

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    Monticello: The Garden

    by von.otter Updated Oct 31, 2009

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    Monticello, Garden Pavilion, May 2009
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    “No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth & no culture comparable to that of the garden.”
    — from a letter sent by Thomas Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale in 1811

    CULTURE VULTURES The vegetable plots are on the edge of the ‘little mountain.’ Jefferson turned to more Old World help for the culture of his earth. Two Italians, Filippo Mazzei and Antonio Giannini, contributed their experience and knowledge with fruit orchards. In 1774, Mazzei gave Jefferson apricot stones and 200 cherry pits, which were planted below the ridge where the vegetables were grown.

    Jefferson’s love of wine led him to plant a grape vineyard (see photo #5), and again Mazzei and Giannini helped with its cultivation. They also helped with orange, lemon and olive trees; none of these semitropical trees survived the climate of the Piedmont. Jefferson, always experimenting, believed that if he threw enough mud against the wall some would stick.

    Rosemary (see photo #4) and other herbs are grown in amongst the vegetables, rather than in a separate herb garden.

    The cute little Garden Pavilion (see photo #1) stands like a sentinel; it was designed by Jefferson.

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    Monticello

    by seagoingJLW Written Apr 13, 2003

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    Monticello and garden

    Before you visit the estate, go to the Monticello Visitors Center located on Rte 20 near I 64. There is a free movie: "Thomas Jefferson: the Pursuit of Liberty" in addition to exhibits and information.

    Monticello is Thomas Jefferson's masterpiece. For more than 40 years he designed, redesigned, built and rebuilt it. Guided tours, limited to 25 people and lasting 30 minutes, run every 4 to 5 minutes.

    The gardens were not only a showplace, but a source of food. There are guided tours of the gardens and grounds from April 1 through October 31.

    About 10 years after the former President's death in 1826, Uriah P. Levy purchased Jefferson's run down estate, that was virtually in ruin. He began a long and costly program of renovation and restoration, including the purchase of an additional 2,500 acres adjoining the historic property. After Levy's death in 1862, his will directed that Monticello - the house and property - be left "to the people of the United States."

    Located in the Virginia Piedmont, Monticello is about two miles southeast of Charlottesville and approximately 125 miles from Washington, D.C.; 110 miles from Williamsburg, Virginia; and 70 miles from Richmond, Virginia.

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    Monticello: The Graveyard

    by von.otter Updated Nov 14, 2009

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    Monticello, Jefferson���s Gravesite, 05/09
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    “I am as happy no where else and in no other society, and all my wishes end, where I hope my days will end, at Monticello. Too many scenes of happiness mingle themselves with all the recollections of my native woods and fields, to suffer them to be supplanted in my affection by any other.”
    — Thomas Jefferson, in a 12.August.1787 letter to his friend and physician, George Gilmer

    END OF DAYS And so he did end his days at Monticello, on the Fourth of July 1826. He and other Jefferson family members are buried at the plantation’s graveyard.

    Our cloudy day visit turned wet when the sky opened up just as we reached the cemetery, a short walk from the mansion. The gray clouds and rain added to the somber nature of the place.

    The site for the graveyard was chosen by Jefferson in 1773. It is owned by an association of his descendants, traced through his daughters, Martha and Maria; burials are still held here.

    Granite obelisks are popular grave site markers; James Madison’s grave site is marked with one. Again, this practice marks a turning to the Old World for inspiration. Even for remembering the dead, these founders of a new nation could not come up with anything new. Jefferson wrote his own epitaph (see photo #1) to be carved on his obelisk. Being president of the United States was not a big deal for Jefferson; his tenure in that office is not mentioned by him. The office of the presidency did not assume its high-profile place on the world stage until well into the 20th century.

    Jefferson's coat-of-arms is documented by the use of a seal on several of his surviving papers. His descendants allowed these arms to be used to illustrate Henry Randall’s 1858 biography, to be engraved on Monticello’s coffee urn, and to be incorporated in the graveyard entrance gate (see photo #3).

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    Monticello Gardens

    by Ewingjr98 Written Sep 15, 2004

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    Jefferson's Monticello Gardens

    Throughout his plantation, Jefferson grew dozens of crops from corn and peas to clover and oats. He raised sheep, hogs, and cattle. For many years, his mills provided cornmeal and flour to the local area. For many years his primary crop on his four farms (Monticello, Shadwell, Tufton, and Lego) was tobacco until his research showed him the damage it did to the soil.

    At the vegetable gardens near the main house, Jefferson experimented with some 330 varieties of vegetables and many fruits. He also tried grapes for wine, berries, and other foods unique to this area of Virginia.

    Jefferson did have about 200 slaves, most of which were inherited from his father and father-in-law. This seems to contradict Jefferson famous quote in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal" but even modern researchers admit that he could never quite come to terms with this dilemma.

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    Visit Monticello, Home of Thomas Jefferson

    by no1birdlady Updated Jul 31, 2006

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    Nickel View of Monticello from the back garden.
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    We visited Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello, in July. It's quite hot then but wasn't bad early in the morning. It opens at 8am and we had a ticket for a tour of the house at 9am. Jefferson studied buildings of ancient Rome and began building his house in 1768. He put it up on top of Little Mountain where he had played when he was a boy, living on his father's farm nearby. The tour of the house is very interesting. We ended up in the back where I took this photo of the Nickel view, the back view of the house that is on our nickel. We also took the tour of the gardens which added some interesting information, much of it from the garden book that Jefferson kept for 60 years about plants he tried and how they did. For instance he grew Sugar Maples but found that it wasn't cold enough there for them to produce maple syrup. And that sesame plants came over on slave ships and are grown for seeds which were pressed to get salad oil. Using the garden book the gardens and orchards have been restored to how they were in Jefferson's lifetime.

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    My favorite place ...

    by shrimp56 Updated Nov 20, 2003

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    Kitchen Garden at Monticello

    ... is the Monticello kitchen garden. I've visited Monticello 3 times and it's fun to see what is growing in the garden! They have worked hard to include only those items that would have been grown when Jefferson was alive.

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    Monticello: Jefferson in Bronze

    by von.otter Updated Nov 7, 2009

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    Monticello, Jefferson & von.otter, 05/09
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    “I am savage enough to prefer the woods, the wilds, and the indepenance of Monticello, to all the brilliant pleasures of this gay capital [Paris] . . . . for tho’ there is less wealth there, there is more freedom, more ease, and less misery.”
    — Thomas Jefferson, from a 6.September.1785 letter to Baron General Friedrich Caspar von Geismar

    This bronze of T.J. stands near the recently-completed visitor center. You must first stop at the Visitor Center, buy timed entry tickets for Monticello and be bussed up to the mansion.

    This full-length likeness of Jefferson is the work of designer and sculptor Ivan Schwartz, whose company, StudioEIS, is located in Brooklyn, NY. Schwartz created the bronze sculptural grouping at James Madison’s Montpelier too (see Orange, VA entry: “Montpelier, Home of James Madison, Bronze Monument”).

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  • Laserrob76's Profile Photo

    Visit the Thomas Jefferson...

    by Laserrob76 Written Sep 2, 2002

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    Visit the Thomas Jefferson House Monticello
    Jefferson began constructing Monticello in 1768. He redesigned it in 1789 after he returned from France. After his second term of President he spent more time at Monticello...

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