Harrisonburg Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Harrisonburg

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    Gen. Turner Ashby Monument

    by etfromnc Updated Jun 29, 2012

    Visit the site of the death of the famed Confederate cavalry leader, "The Black Knight of the Confederacy," on any anniversary of his death during the June 6, 1862, Skirmish at Chestnut Ridge. Each year there is a special commemorative event hosted by the Turner Ashby Chapter 162 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
    For the special experience which my handsome hound and I had at the sesquicentennial observance of Turner Ashby's death, please read the main page of my Harrisonburg pages.
    Since eluding a Union attempt to cut him off at Strasburg on June 1, Stonewall Jackson had withdrawn his army south, up the Shenandoah Valley, pursued on the west side of Massanutten Mountain by troops under Gen. John C. Fremont, and on the east side, in the Page Valley, by the division of Gen. James Shieldd. Reaching Harrisonburg, Jackson turned his army southeast, towards Port Republic. On June 6, Fremont's army reached Harrisonburg and advance elements of his forces clashed with the Confederate rear guard in a skirmish at Chestnut Ridge (also known as "The Battle of Harrisonburg"), a relatively small action with a major consequence: Turner Ashby, the "Black Knight of the Confederacy," was killed. The next day, June 7, Union advance troops marched down Port Republic Road; late in the day, the Federal troops made contact with Confederate pickets near Union Church, setting the stage for the next day's Battle of Cross Keys.

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  • Mid-Atlantic College Radio Conference (MACRoCk)

    by cmk1015 Updated Nov 5, 2009

    Have you heard of bands such as Animal Collective, Dashboard Confessional, Saves the Day, Elliott Smith, or Converge? You may be surprised to learn that they, along with hundreds of other independent musicians, have played right here in Harrisonburg, Virginia at the annual Mid-Atlantic College Radio Conference. More commonly known as “MACRoCk”, this two-day festival has both the citizens of, and visitors to the ‘burg talking year-round.

    Every spring, MACRoCk recognizes the grass-roots businesses of the friendly city, while supporting promising, independent musicians. The restaurants and shops of the quaint downtown and nearby area are transformed into lively venues to accommodate the numerous bands and visitors the conference brings in from all over the nation. Once associated with nearby James Madison University, MACRoCk has since become its own not-for-profit organization run exclusively by a small, yet devoted group of JMU students and Harrisonburg residents. With the help of JMU’s student radio station, WXJM, and support from local businesses, MACRoCk has seen consistent growth and increasing recognition over the years.

    Having attended MACRoCk the past two years and now serving as a committee member, I am already looking forward to the next, which will be held April 2nd and 3rd of 2010. With all-access badges costing around $15 (presale) and one-day passes available for $10-$12, it is an inexpensive way to see many great musicians while experiencing the unique culture of Harrisonburg. In between shows, be sure to stop by the educational panels where a variety of music industry and community-related topics are guaranteed to interest all audiences. Whether you are a long-time resident, JMU student, or just a visitor, you will quickly find that MACRoCk is a unique Harrisonburg experience that will have you talking about for the rest of the year as well.

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  • Pick Your Own Pumpkins

    by christy.chilton Updated Nov 3, 2009

    Getting lost in the corn maze wasn’t my fault. I said to turn left, but we went right and found ourselves in the middle of the maze, exactly where we were just five minutes earlier. (I knew this because I had written my initials into the dirt so we would know if this happened). But we started again in the opposite direction, following a couple seven year olds plowing through the maze. They looked pretty confident in where they were going, and I don’t think they suspected we were behind them.

    Lohr’s Farm is a family owned farm in Broadway that opens its fields every fall for family play days and class field trips. In an effort to commemorate our senior year of college and capture the essence of our childhood, we set out on an adventure to a pumpkin patch in hopes of finding good pumpkins to carve for Halloween. What we expected was a pile of picked pumpkins ready for us to sort through. What we got was a literal translation of the phrase “pumpkin patch.”

    Right past the fence and the welcome booth is a small patch of land speckled with bright orange balls. There are five rows about one hundred yards long with pumpkins still attached to their vines. We grabbed a wheel barrel and hedge cutters and set off into the field to choose our own pumpkin right off of the ground. Once we picked it out, we would take it to the front, pay by the pound then wheel it off to the car.

    It was challenging (to say the least) for people so picky about their gourds. The good pumpkins that were close to the paths were already taken so we had to dig a little deeper to get to the good ones. My two friends had already found theirs. Whitney got a light orange one that fit perfectly in her hands and Mike had chosen bright lopsided one that stood up on its own with a little bit of a lean. I kept looking, and eventually found the perfect pumpkin. It was so round and so bright that a picture wouldn’t capture its beauty. We cut it delicately from the vine and wheeled away to the front of the patch.

    For an extra six dollars we got to go to the Playland. It had the basic pumpkin patch amenities: farm animals to pet, holes to put your head through and take pictures, and a station if you wanted to stay and carve your pumpkin. For the smaller visitors there are tumble tubes and kernel pits, and they offer hayrides through the farm pulled by one of the family’s tractors. Of to the side is a three acre corn maze that proves to be a challenge for all ages.

    We entered the corn maze behind a small group of kids, thinking we would get through it quick and be on our way. Our twenty-minute corn maze adventure turned into an hour-long trek when we kept making wrong turn after wrong turn. We were running out of ideas, losing our sense of direction, and considered giving up. But we eventually made it out with the help of some navigationally savvy seven year olds and their stuffed cat, Bernard.

    For a ten-minute drive and little under fifteen dollars, we were able to relive our childhood memories and make some new ones with the help of a wheel barrel and some very friendly staff. We got to pick our own pumpkins straight off the vine and panicked in the corn maze when we thought we’d be there forever. When we got back, it took me a couple days to decide how to carve my pumpkin. You can’t just go around carving holes into something that perfect.

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    Sight Seeing

    by lefties Written Jun 20, 2005

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    An enormous amount to see. Once you cross the Potomac River you have the Lincoln Memorial and the Vietnam Memorial on you right locating Constitution Ave you will see the Washington Monument and then continue to Pennsylvania Ave the White House comes into view on the left. It's just all downhill from there.

    The White House
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  • The Green Valley Book Fair...

    by shenandoah Written Oct 5, 2002

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    The Green Valley Book Fair comes to Harrisonburg about 4 times a year. INCREDIBLE selection of new books from many different publishers at very low prices...well worth a visit for any type of reader.
    It's out in the countryside at an auction house. People are friendly and helpful.

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  • The Dayton Farmers Market

    by shenandoah Written Oct 5, 2002

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    This is a group of shops in an area outside Harrisonburg which shows some of Virginia's best local products...jellies, jams, hams, beef jerky, fudge, soaps, crafts, souvenirs, etc. etc. Just about everyone can find SOMETHING to take home for friends. Also, you can learn more about the Mennonite way of life.

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    More Sights to See

    by lefties Written Jun 22, 2005

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    A plethora of sights to visit and see. The entire Smithsonian Museum complexes, the white house, Jefferson, Lincoln, and war memorials to name just a few. Picture below the Washington Monument.

    The Washington Monument
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    • Museum Visits
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Harrisonburg Things to Do

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