Onancock Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by grandmaR
  • Steps overgrown with roses
    Steps overgrown with roses
    by grandmaR
  • Washday on the farm
    Washday on the farm
    by jelw

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Onancock

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Francis Makemie - Presbyterian Missionary

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Of Scottish descent, Francis Makemie was born in Ramelton, County Donegal, Ireland in 1658. Because he as a Presbyterian, he was not allowed to enter the University of Ireland, he got a degree in Glasgow instead. He was ordained as a missionary to the colonies in 1682. He preached in the middle Atlantic area (Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina).

    In 1684, Makemie established the first Presbyterian congregation in Snow Hill, Maryland. Francis married the daughter of William Anderson, a successfull businessman and landowner who helped him become established.

    After a visit to England in 1706, he formed the seven missionaries working in scattered churches of the Middle colonies into a voluntary association. This became the first presbytery in America, with power to license its own preachers. This significant act made American Presbyterianism independent of external control.

    In 1705, he wrote "A Plain and Friendly Perswasive to the Inhabitants of Virginia and Maryland for Promoting Towns an Cohabitation". It dealt entirely with secular matters such as the advantages of forming towns for commerce, education, and worship.

    In January 1707, he was arrested by Lord Cornbury (aka Edward Hyde), the governor of New York, for preaching without a license. Makemie had a license to preach as a dissenter in Virginia and Maryland. After spending 6 weeks in jail, Makemie was aquitted in June 1707 based on the English Toleration Act of 1689. Lord Cornbury was recalled

    Though found innocent, he was ordered to pay the cost of his prosecution. The New York legislature passed legislation to keep this from happening again in the future. This is considered a landmark case in favor of religious freedom in America.

    After the trial he wrote the pamphlet "A Narrative of a New and Unusual American Imprisonment".

    Makemie died in 1708. At the bicentennial of American Presbyterianism in 1906, a monument in his honor was erected on the Virginia farm where he is buried in addition to the plaque in Onancock.

    Steps overgrown with roses
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jelw's Profile Photo

    Take a drive to see Americana

    by jelw Written Dec 1, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A simple drive around the countryside gives you a glimpse of America through the ages.
    Plantations, old slave quarters, flourishing farms and vanishing farms.
    Sometimes something as simple as washday can be a cultural interest point all its own.

    Washday on the farm
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • jelw's Profile Photo

    Vanishing Farms

    by jelw Written Dec 1, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As you drive this beautiful farming community you will see the mega-corporate farms as well as the dying family farms.

    time taking over the family farm
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Farm Stay
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Onancock

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

17 travelers online now

Comments

Onancock Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Onancock off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Onancock sightseeing.

View all Onancock hotels