White House of the Confederacy, Richmond

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    second white house of the confederacy
    by doug48
  • entry hall of the White House of the Confederacy
    entry hall of the White House of the...
    by b1bob
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    Historical Landmarker
    by ATXtraveler
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    White House of the Confederacy

    by b1bob Updated Jun 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White House of the Confederacy
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    This building was built in 1818 and its owner, wanting to help the Confederate cause, donated his home to be the presidential palace of the Confederacy. President Davis and his family moved into this house in August of 1861 and stayed almost until Grant took Richmond in April, 1865. The 40-minute tour begins with a talk in the basement on the history of the house and then it's up a flight of stairs to the main entrance hall. Ever since the Confederate Literary Society bought the House, just short of being demolished, in 1896, there has been a big effort to have donated, buy back, or obtain on loan original pieces from the era in which the Davises lived here. Fully half of the furnishings are originals, the rest are period pieces and spot-on replicas. The Museum staff takes great care to make every room in the house look as if the Davises had just gone on holiday to Hilton Head. My friend Phil is right when he suggests getting the full package (museum and White House) tour because you do get a lot bang for the buck.

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    White House of the Confederacy

    by zrim Updated Aug 12, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White House of the Confederacy (rear view)

    In my opinion, no tour of Richmond would be complete without a visit to the White House of the Confederacy. It is a historical site of the utmost importance. It matters not what your own view of the Civil War might be; it is critical, I believe, to be able to step back into history and view the place which was the command center of the Confederacy.

    The White House of the Confederacy is only open to those who take the group tour. I would strongly suggest that the combination ticket of the White House and the Museum of the Confederacy be purchased. Not only is it a money saving deal, but the Museum of the Confederacy is a top notch museum in its own right.

    The White House of the Confederacy is relatively small and the tour takes no more than a half hour or so. About fifty percent of the original furnishings have been restored. Unfortunately, photos are not alllowed on the tour so I cannot show you Jefferson Davis' office or the state dining room or parlor. But rest assured that the White House has been lovingly restored and attention has been paid to every last detail.

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    White House of the Confederacy

    by ATXtraveler Written Jun 9, 2007

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    While in the heart of Richmond, it is appropriate for you to visit the heart of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis' residence during the time. It is known as the White House of the Confederacy, although in comparison to the White House in Washington, this building meant alot more. This particular building was not only a residence, but also a site of Jefferson Davis' home office, and even the main living areas were turned into strategic war planning centers.

    The historic information regarding this building shows that it was built in 1818 by Dr. John Brockenbrough, and went through a couple owners prior to the Davis' occupying it. It was owned and occupied until 1865 when the Davis family fled south through to Georgia, before eventually trying to flee west to avoid Union troops. The building continued on longer than the Confederacy however by being converted into the headquarters for the US occupation. After the war had completely ended, the building was converted into a public school. While inside in the tour, both Nat and I wondered how in the world they kept some of the artifacts of the Davis' reign intact with school children running around!

    In 1890 after it had served its sentence with the children, the Confederate Memorial Literary Society purchased the buildings and began restoring it. It was the home to the Museum of the Confederacy for almost 80 years until it became completely restored to just a memory of the famous residents that lived there.

    Admission is $8 for just the White House, or $11 for the combo with the Museum.

    Monday- Saturday 10 am to 5 pm
    Sunday 12-5 pm

    Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day

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    white house of the confederacy

    by doug48 Updated Jun 5, 2011

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    pictured is the second white house of the confederacy. the first white house of the confederacy was located in montgomery alabama, confederate president jefferson davis and his family moved into this 1818 townhouse in may 1861. president davis lived in this house until april 1865 just before the fall of the confederacy. the confederate white house was opened as a museum of the confederacy in 1896. the museum has an outstanding collection of the davis family personal effects and exhibits on famous confederate generals. a must see site for students of civil war history when in downtown richmond. the second white house of the confederacy is listed on the national register of historic places.

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    White House of the Confederacy

    by acemj Updated Oct 19, 2002

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    The White House of the Confederacy is connected with the Museum of the Confederacy. Purchase your ticket at the museum and your tour guide will take you throught the home of Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the Civil War.

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