Tangier Island Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by grandmaR
  • Another photo of the post office
    Another photo of the post office
    by grandmaR
  • Ferry
    Ferry
    by grandmaR

Most Recent Local Customs in Tangier Island

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Post Office Traffic Jam

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 12, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Post office
    4 more images

    The Post Office is a small building across from the Methodist church.

    The mail comes in by boat from Crisfield every day about 10:30, but there is no mail delivery on the island. People have to come to the PO in order to get their mail. So all afternoon, the folks of Tangier come to the PO to get their mail - they walk, they bike, they have scooters, they come on golf carts, and sometimes they even drive regular vehicles like the truck pictured in photo 2.

    If you want to see anyone particular, just sit on the bench outside the post office and wait.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Roads and Bridges

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 12, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bridge from the side
    4 more images

    There are two main roads on Tangier Island. Main Street, and Ridge. Ridge is on a ridge which is about 5 feet higher than Main Street. In between Main and Ridge is a swampy area (photo 2) crossed by four bridges. This is one of them and photo 2 and 4 shows others

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Crab Shedding Sheds

    by grandmaR Updated Mar 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crab shedding shed next to the marina
    4 more images

    Blue crabs live 2-3 years. They grow by shedding (molting) the hard shell (exoskeleton). The molting takes place more than a dozen times during their lifetime.

    When the blue crab comes out of the hard shell it is very soft. That's why it is called a soft-shell crab. About two weeks before the crab sheds the hard shell it becomes what watermen call the 'peeler crab' The watermen search for the peeler crabs, and bring them home and keep them alive in soft-crab 'farms' until they shed their hard shells.

    The peeler crab goes through three stages before they actually shed. The first stage is called the "green crab stage". At this stage, the crab starts changing color and becomes less spry than the average crab.

    The second stange is the "rank peeler stage". The crab's color changes to a deep red color. The hard shell starts cracking under the pinters.

    The third and final stage is the 'buster crab stage' The crab now actually bursts its hard shell and frees itself in a matter of minutes. At this stage, the crab has to be removed from the pen because the crabs who still have shells will eat the soft-shell ones.

    The Chesapeake produces more blue crabs and soft-shell crabs than any other body of water in the world.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jelw's Profile Photo

    Burial, necessity begats tradition.

    by jelw Updated Aug 13, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ...mother of invention

    On much of the Eastern Shore of Virginia and specifically on the Island of Tangier burial is treated differently than is typical in the U.S.

    Family burial plots on personal property are still in use to this day. Though not used as frequently as public or church cemetaries today; you are still permitted under law to bury your family members in your yard.
    With such a limited amount of land on Tangiers ridge it became a necessity to bury family members close to each other and directly adjacent to the home. They put the cement slabs over top of the burial site so that in the floods the bodies would not dislodge and float about.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • jelw's Profile Photo

    Rock and roll with the waves, not the party.

    by jelw Updated Jul 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Day of Worship

    Tangier is primarily a conservative and religious community. There is a large cultural difference here as opposed to most of our country.
    I believe Tangier is considered a "Dry" town. Alcohol has never been openly enjoyed in my experience.
    Clothing should be comfortable but not the best idea to walk about in a bikini.
    Profanity is a no-no.
    This community was offered large sums of money to produce movies on their Island, have been turned down in part due to the profanity and sexual content in the script.
    Go for the experience, just be mindful and you will enjoy a cultural visit you are not likely to find in the U.S. anymore.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Advertising

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 10, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bayside harbor entrance

    As you come in the channel, various busineeses (mostly restaurants) advertise their wares. On the breakwater on the Chesapeake Bay side was an small billboard advertising Fisherman's Corner restaurant.

    On a practical note, one comes in the channel heading directly for these riprap rocks in order to avoid a shoal coming across from the north side of the channel, and then you turn and run parallel to the rocks almost all the way to the other side of the channel to avoid the shoal making out from the south point of the entrance. Only then can you turn into the channel.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Above Ground Burial

    by grandmaR Written Sep 11, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The water table is too high on most of the island to allow for burial. So some burials are done at the surface of the ground (as is also done in Key West and New Orleans among other places - but on Tangier the graves are much less elaborate). There are a lot of graves in people's yards - anywhere that the land isn't too marshy.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Cruise
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    School Days

    by grandmaR Written Aug 15, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tanier All Age School

    This is the only school on Tangier and it teaches all grades through high school. Our tour guide said that the high school graduated 6 students in June. She added the most of the teachers were 'from' Tangier..

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Recipe Fence

    by grandmaR Written Aug 12, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Recipe Fence
    1 more image

    Much information about Tangier can be gleaned from the fences. There are small boxes on fences with rolled up papers in them which contain a map of the island, and some other information. Honor system - take a map and put $1 in the box.

    Another place to get information is the "Recipe Fence". The local recipes are displayed here, and you can take 10 of them for $1.00.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Crabcake

    by grandmaR Written Aug 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Crabcake posing for his picture

    This is a cat named Crabcake. Crabcake lives on Tangier Island several houses down from Hilda Crockett's Chesapeake House. From November 1 to April 30, Crabcake stays around his home. He eats and sleeps at home. But from when Crockett's opens May 1, until they close Oct 31st, Crabcake sits outside of Crocketts every day, even though he doesn't get fed at Crocketts. He must be there because he enjoys the attention and all the petting that the tourists give to him.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Local Communication

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 10, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A notice on the telephone pole

    This piece of paper tacked on the telephone pole says:

    "Lordy Lordy! Look whose forty. Renee Taylor"

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Tangier Island

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

98 travelers online now

Comments

Tangier Island Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Tangier Island local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Tangier Island sightseeing.

View all Tangier Island hotels