Williamsburg Shopping

  • Shopping
    by Yaqui
  • Shopping
    by Yaqui
  • Shopping
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Shopping in Williamsburg

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    McKenzie Apothecary: Food and Drink~

    by Yaqui Written Aug 5, 2012

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    This little shop is only seasonal. It is a small counter-service concession offering drinks and light refreshments. My sister treated us to some really huge delicous chocolate and oatmeal cookies and some much needed water.

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    James Craig Jeweller: Golden Ball~

    by Yaqui Written Aug 5, 2012

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    Colonial Williamsburg’s silversmiths have been hard at work hammering, sculpting, and plying brass, pewter, and sterling silver to give you fashionable one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry. Choose from earrings, pendants, charms, precious gemstone rings, and more. Hand-engraving is available.

    Hours of Operation:
    Mon.:10 a.m.–5 p.m.
    Tues.:10 a.m.–5 p.m.
    Wed.:10 a.m.–5 p.m.
    Thurs.:10 a.m.–5 p.m.
    Fri.: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sat.: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sun.:10 a.m.–5 p.m.

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    Tarpley, Thompson & Company: Bring Your Imagination to Life

    by Yaqui Written Aug 5, 2012

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    Browse through wonderful reproduction of toys, games, kids in period clothing and more. Please see the wonderful pieces of jewelry and hand-woven straw hats too.

    Hours of Operation:
    Mon.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Tues.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Wed.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Thurs.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Fri.: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sat.: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sun.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.

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    John Greenhow Store: 18th-century Décor

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 5, 2012

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    We ventured into here to escape the heat. What a wonderful shop with so many different type of goods. It's a replica of an actual historic building. You will find imported porcelain, floorcloths, needlepoint fabrics, tinware, candles, toys, craftsmen’s tools and much more. They even have a little exhibit of what John Greenhow's office desk might have looked like.

    Hours of
    Operation:
    Mon.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Tues.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Wed.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Thurs.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Fri.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sat.: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.
    Sun.:10 a.m.–6 p.m.

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    Merchants Square~Duke of Gloucester Street: Enjoyable

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 25, 2012

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    In 1927, Merchants Square is was recognized as one of the earliest, if not the first planned shopping districts in the United States. While John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and the Reverend W.A.R. Goodwin were envisioning the restoration of Virginia’s colonial capital, they realized that the business community already in Williamsburg would need to be folded into the master plan.

    There are some really wonderful shops here with lots to offer. Many common items, yet some very specialty items too. If you call the number below, they will connect you to any of the shops.

    What to pay: Anywhere from average to high range too!

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    Prime Outlets: shop til you drop

    by davecallahan Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ninety Stores multiplied by ten minutes per store equals about 15 hours of shopping.

    My wife did it all in under 3 hours (and that includes time for a Ben and Jerry's ice cream).

    This outlet mall has external access from store to store. It is in a big u-shape around a large parking lot.
    Top names include: Calvin Klein, Fossil, Reebok, Haggar, Gap, Eddie Bauer, Aeropostale, Zales, KB Toys, Nike, LL Bean, Wilsons, OshKosh, Samsonite, Polo Ralph Lauren.... just to name a few.

    So if you got the time, the bucks and the inclination.... have at it.

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    La Tienda: The best of Spain in America

    by b1bob Written Feb 25, 2008

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    La Tienda
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    La Tienda ("the store" for those from Roxboro) is located in Toano just south of I-64 and north of the Rt. 60 and 30 intersection in an office park. Despite explicit directions, you really have to be on your toes to get there without being lost. What makes La Tienda unique is that it is the only store that specialises solely in Spanish products in this part of Virginia. Sometimes, they leave the shop unattended. There is a sign requesting customers to ring the bell for service.

    What to buy: They offer all manner of food including Spanish hams, and all the fixins for paella, sweets, wines, sherries, and other Spanish delicacies. There is also cookware which includes paella pans of different sizes, plates, and even bath products. I couldn't find any saffron or any other spices in the store. As expensive as saffron is, I bet they keep it under lock and key. It is a great place to shop if you love Spanish cuisine like I do. There is probably more in their online store than there is in here.

    What to pay: Because all of the things are imported from Spain, you are going to pay more for items sold here.

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    • Food and Dining

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    Prime Outlets: Prime Outlets

    by b1bob Updated Sep 22, 2007

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    Prime Outlets
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    Prime Outlets is a shopping centre of about 80 outlet stores. An outlet store helps a company unload its surplus product at a reduced price. Among the more prominent tenants of this shopping centre: Nike, Oshkosh B'Gosh, L.L. Bean, Samsonite and Corningware. There are many more. All those clothing stores are nice. I mean, what's wrong with overstocked clothes at a serious discount? However, I like to stuff my face. The Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory is one of my favourite places, but I also enjoy Le Gourmet Chef. Not only does the Gourmet Chef offer kitchen supplies, but they also offer a wide range of foods and sauces, many of which are put out by Food Network personalities such as Emeril Lagasse, Ina Garten, and Paula Deen. I picked up a couple of sauces by Paula Deen. There were free samples of several brands of sauces for pretzels and corn chips. I was most keen on the olive oil based dipping sauces for bread. Stopping here was like an appetiser before lunch.

    What to buy: Women's, men's, children's and family apparel; health & beauty; shoes; luggage / handbags; home furnishings; housewares; accessories; specialty; and food.

    en español, em português

    What to pay: Everything is sold at discount.

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    Williamsburg Outlet Mall: Shockingly Low Prices

    by b1bob Updated Sep 19, 2007

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    Williamsburg Outlet Mall
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    Williamsburg Outlet Mall is a collection of 31 stores all under one roof that sell overstocked product of various clothing and accessory companies at between 20-70% off the original retail price. There are many outlet malls in the area, but this is the only enclosed outlet mall for many miles and kilometers. My favourite places to shop at this mall are not the clothing outlets, but Crafters Market and Always a Holiday are perfect for buying cheap but meaningful whatnots.

    What to buy: Cosmetics, clothing for all shapes and sizes, shoes, jewelry, toys, and health food are for sale here. There is also a Hershey's Ice Cream Parlor to treat yourself and well-behaved kids whom you take shopping.

    What to pay: Discounts are commonplace here. Many folks travel for hundreds of miles and kilometers for this kind of bargain. Sadly, outlet malls like these prosper at the expense of well-established local institutions such as Basketville and the Candle Factory.

    en español, em português

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  • Lightfoot Pottery

    by doc48 Written Oct 9, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Lightfoot Pottery is a prime reason my wife and I returned to Williamsburg year after year. This conglomaration of outlets and stores covers several acres. It started after WWII as the location where the pottery that made the ceramics for Colonial Williamsburg sold seconds. It then expanded into a location for home furnishings, outdoor statues, food and wines (and great beers), a nursery, Christmas and crafts, iron work, on and on. Often after hitting the Pottery we drive home 600 miles in a car looking like the Beverly Hillbillies. BUT, check the prices. I recently priced a 15 ounce can of Brunswick stew (what could be more Virginian?) that sold for $4.65 at the Pottery. Across town at Ukrops it sold for $3.50. Let the buyer beware. The Pottery has items you cannot get elsewhere. It will also rip you off. Tired of the 18th century or water rides? Try the Pottery. What a trip!

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    Tarpley's Store: For children but not only

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 5, 2006

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    TARPLEY'S  STORE

    Tarpley's Store is designated for the most important folks in the world - for children. But I found it interesting as well. It offers toys, games, candies, clothing and hats of colonial era and jewelry for children of all ages. Add some ceramics and fans for both old and young ladies. Some goods are imported from England.

    HISTORY
    Original buiding was put up at this place prior to 1755 and burned in 1860. From 1759 to 1763 it was owned and occupied by James Tarpley as a store. The building was reconstructed in 1930s.

    What to buy: Colonial tricornered hats for boys, fans or jewelry for girls and chocolate bar, candies, dried fruits for everyone.

    What to pay: Rather expensive, although... look:
    Chocolate bar (plain or almond, standart size) - $2.00
    Coffee (1/2 lb bag) - $8.00
    Candied almonds, pistachios, apple slices, chocolate almonds - $1.00 per 2 oz
    Are they all much cheaper in say Wal-Mart food center?

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    James Craig Jeweller: Silversmith and jewelry

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 5, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Golden Ball

    The building, on my picture, houses James Craig's shop. James Craig was a son of a surgeon and talented jeweller who run a shop in this buiding at least since 1772. The house is called the Golden Ball after the gold ball hang above the entrance.

    Currently, the store offers silver and gold jewelry and other crafted items (brass and pewter hollowware pieces) inspired by the 18th century. And it serves as an exhibit site, where skilled artisans (silversmiths) make silver jewelry using the tools and methods of 18th century. Decorative piercing and engraving as well as watch making is also available.

    What to buy: I am not an expert on jewelry but I would pay attention to some silver items, especially thick and simple in design bracelets (favourite of my wife :-). Although they are much less expensive in my country, Poland.

    What to pay: I think, it's an expensive store.

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    Post Office: Atmosphere of old times office

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 5, 2006

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    POST  OFFICE  STORE  -  INTERIOR

    Relatively small building in beautiful downtown Colonial Williamsburg housed Post Office and Printing Office which sold paper products in 18th century. Keep in mind that that eighteenth-century paper was made from rags. Paper from wood pulp didn’t come into common use until the 1840s.

    Now, there is a gift store on the ground floor and the Printing Office below. The store's interior is full of items and papers from 18th century office.

    What to buy: They sell stamps, letters and postcards hand-canceled with reproduction 18th century Williamsburg postmark, stationery, maps, reproductions prints, leather-bound books, quill pens, ink, inkwells and sealing wax. So, if you want to add a good, old-fashioned atmosphere to your current office...

    I found most interesting some reproduction printings from 18th century Williamsburg press and a book (reprint from 1736) Every Man his own Doctor (on curing diseases).

    What to pay: Rather expensive store but for small things you pay less, for example: $2.00 for white quill pen, $2.50 for 5 cedar pencils, $1.25 for small reprint on... battledore.

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    Market Square Stands: Kingdom of men's hats

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 5, 2006

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    ME AND MY HAT AT MARKET SQUARE STANDS

    There are wooden tables covered by larger wooden roof put on a lawn, south of the main avenue (Duke of Gloucester Street). They formed open-air market area. didn't find there anything interesrting but thenths, hundreds of old men's hats of which one I tried. Well, there are some toys, baskets and pottery sold there as well.

    What to buy: Hats if you like. They varied in shape, size and design but the most typical were either early colonial, 17th century broad brimmed hats or younger, 18th century tricornered hats - made of wool (not beaver felt like the originals).

    What to pay: In October 2004 without sales tax (add 4.5%):
    Mae's laced hat with button - $26.00
    Men's braided hat - $35.90.

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    John Greenhow Store: General information

    by matcrazy1 Updated Oct 5, 2006

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    LOGO  OF  JOHN  GREENHOW  STORE

    The first store I visited was small John Greenhow Store on the ground floor of 2-storey, Georgian in style, building. Like most stores it was signed by old-fashionable logo.

    GENERAL INFORMATION
    Cons
    There are numerous (over 50), mostly small stores for visitors of colonial Williamsburg. They are all tourist stores with high or very high prices. Do not expect to find there any very original or authentic or old stuff. I didn't shop in Williamsburg (well, almost).

    Pros
    But, anyway, I had a lot of fun doing window shopping. Why? OK, top 5 reasons:
    - architecture (both exteriors and interiors) the stores look like they had to look in 18th century,
    - stuff to buy - I got to know what natives could buy in 18th century, what they ate, wore and liked,
    - tradesmen and tradeswomen wore traditional costumes of the era and often treated visitors like... governors :-),
    - I admired the art of packing stuff, those all, numerous wrappings, packagings, boxes, containers etc.
    - I loved to look at happy faces of numerous visitors buying so many strange and unuseful things for so high prices :-).

    WHERE TO SHOP?
    Almost all stores are located along the main avenue (Duke of Gloucester Street) and especially at its western end, at and north of the Merchants Square. Well, there are stores at the Visitors Center as well.

    WHEN TO SHOP?
    There are no fixed hours. Most stores are open Mon - Sat 9.00 am (or 9.30 or 10.00) to 6.00 pm (or 9.00 pm) and Sunday 10.00 am (or 11.00) to 6.00 pm (or 9.00 pm).

    WHAT TO BUY?
    Personally I was interested most in some colonial food (candies, chocolates, coffee, tea, beer etc.), books on colonial life and culture and music (CDs, DVDs). Urszula found some interesting ceramics and clothes (woman's hats).

    What to buy: John Greenhow Store offers wide variety of reproductions of 18th century ceramics, metals and textiles for the home. Urszula liked some ceramics.

    What to pay: Williamsburg's prices. Generally expensive!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Architecture

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