Colonial, Williamsburg

13 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • carriage rides
    carriage rides
    by laurenzi1
  • Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson
    by laurenzi1
  • reenactor in the Palace
    reenactor in the Palace
    by laurenzi1
  • DEBBBEDB's Profile Photo

    Anderson's Blacksmith Shop

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Aug 18, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hammering the hot iron into shape
    4 more images

    Because we have horses, we know that a blacksmith makes all kinds of objects out of iron. The person who shoes horses is a Farrier which is a kind of blacksmith.

    The blacksmith James Anderson was appointed public armourer in 1776 by the General Assembly of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia. Anderson began to enlarge his small, commercial blacksmithing operation Colonial Williamsburg has newly reconstructed the main armoury building which includes four blacksmith forges. A blacksmith's forge consisted of a raised brick hearth outfitted with bellows to feed its soft-coal fire and a hood to carry away the smoke.

    Sun,M,T,W,Th,F,Sat 9-5:00 You can also buy some of the products that they make

    There is also an actual commercial shop called Williamsburg Blacksmiths on 26 Williams Street - phone number below. Summer Hours: Monday - Thursday, 10 AM to 5 PM

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mccalpin's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by mccalpin Written Sep 29, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We have been to Colonial Williamsburg several times, including twice having Thanksgiving dinner there in the taverns.

    As you may know, Colonial Williamsburg is right in the town of Williamsburg - you walk from the streets of one town into the streets of the other with no barrier - this is a bit weird if you're expecting some sort of gate and ticket office. Well, there is a ticket office, but that's to get into some of the buildings. But you will see people in modern dress who live nearby walking their dogs through the streets of the Colonial town...kind of makes it a living history.

    In the buildings and occasionally walking around, you will see characters in period custom. The characters are set in a time just before the outbreak of the revolution, usually 1775, in our experience. Thus, when you speak to these people, it will be just as if you had walked into a time machine...they will speak Colonial English to you and won't know what you're talking about when you mention anything more modern than that.

    In one case, my wife had a great conversation with Mrs.X, the owner of one of the taverns, who was wearing this huge floor-length dress that was essentially a quilt. Since my wife is a quilter, they had a great conversation about it until my wife mentioned that she used sewing machine to do the quilting. The tavern owner just smiled and didn't say a word at that.

    The characters are also doing real jobs. The cobbler makes shoes that many other colonists wear as part of their uniforms. The quilted dress above was made by people on-site. We went once in February, and there was an older fellow who was taking care of cold frames under which he was going to start the first vegetables of the season.

    There is also a museum on-site...but you would never know it. On the south side of the Colonial town, there is a building that was the site of the first asylum in the US, if I remember it correctly. It looks somewhat like a small prison, but the "inmates" were able to live one to a cell so it was more like public housing for those who were unable to cope. Weird, huh? Yeah, what's weirder is that you go downstairs (i.e., underground) in this building, walk 100-200 feet and then you come up in the museum. What? Where is this museum?

    It turns out that behind the asylum, there is a solid brick wall, the kind that is used to screen trash containers and local facility operations. Since there are no windows in the wall, it never dawns on you that this is actually a building full of stuff - it's a very effective disguise.

    Although the museum does have a lot of clothing, which may not interest everyone, there are period weapons, tools, and a lot of coins that were all dug up in and around Williamsburg.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • laurenzi1's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by laurenzi1 Updated Dec 19, 2010
    carriage rides
    4 more images

    I guess everyone knows about Colonial Williamsburg and what it offers. We went to Jamestown 1st and tried to visit all the sites in chorological order. It gives you a better sense of how the area developed in the early years.

    While visiting Williamsburg, we had a private tour guide for ½ day, the private guides offer a wealth of information not found in any pamphlets or maps and is money well spent.

    Was this review helpful?

  • davecallahan's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by davecallahan Updated Jul 4, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    We went to Colonial Williamsburg with high expectations (probably unrealistically high).
    It was at the beginning of the summer season and not on any eventful weekend but in the middle of the week (probably not the best of times to go to this place).

    There were most of the things you have seen pictures of in VT and other websites offering trips to Colonial WIlliamsburg:
    plenty of people in period costumes; craftsmen doing things like barrel-making and wood-carving and farming and shoe-making and tin-smithing; there were some animals like the oxen teams and the mules and some chickens; beautiful homes (some of which were off-limits because they were occupied) and gardens; grand estates and manors; eateries (both modern and colonial) and souvenier/gift shops.
    We did not see any of the soldier formations or parades or firing of the canons or fireworks.

    It was a pleasant time BUT....
    I thought it was a bit commercialized; it was definitely overcrowded even during the weekdays. It was very expensive.

    On the whole, I am glad I went but I don't think I need to ever go back again.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • SSerre's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg Rakes in the Bucks!

    by SSerre Updated Apr 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Save your money, and walk through for free first! We only had a few hours, so walked through without having the official "pass". We got to see all the same houses, talk to a few of the same colonial-dressed tour guides, and get the same stockade pictures as everyone else and saved oodles of money (especially with seven adults).

    Don't worry, they'll get your money elsewhere with those ridiculously priced food, drinks, or period hats.

    One ticket option was the Colonial Sampler, which is $34 per adult, and it still doesn't allow you full access! The full Key to the City pass is $48 (gee, and I thought Busch Gardens was steep, at least they have rides!). One of the listed benefits for the Key to the City pass is free parking at the visitors center - which is already free, by the way.

    Was this review helpful?

  • upesnlwc's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg Ghost Tour

    by upesnlwc Written Jan 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Celebrating with new stories by L.B. Taylor, Jr., hear ghost stories, folklore and legends as well as the old favorites. This tour is guided by candlelight through the College of William & Mary and through Colonial Williamsburg's Duke of Glouchester Street.

    Tickets are $9 USD per person, and reservations are required.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by lashr1999 Updated Jul 9, 2005
    Colonial Williamsburg

    There is a lot to do in the Williamsburg area. A whole section of town has been turned into a living history museum in the period of 1774. You can see various buildings and activities and people in 1774 attire. .

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Study Abroad
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by Jefie Written Aug 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Governor's Palace at Colonial Williamsburg

    Colonial Williamsburg truly is a unique learning experience. As you walk along the Duke of Gloucester Street, going from the Capitol building to the College of William and Mary, you will learn about Colonial life by going in the different buildings and asking questions to the many period characters living and working in Colonial Williamsburg.

    Complete your experience by eating at one of the taverns and shopping around Merchants Square.

    A day-pass will give you complete access to all the historic buildings but visitors are allowed to walk around the streets of Colonial Williamsburg for free.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Colonial Williamsburg

    by grkboiler Written Mar 1, 2004
    Street in Williamsburg

    Colonial Williamsburg is a very realistic look into colonial life in America and there is so much to learn here. Everyone working here is very knowledgeable about the history of Williamsburg and the way of life in the 1700's.

    Over 500 restored historical buildings are available to explore, and the staff is dressed in replica colonial clothing. It is literally a step back in time and it is definitely worth spending a day here if you are in Washington, DC, or nearby parts of Virginia.

    This is an excellent place for families and children, and people interested in history. Colonial Williamsburg is open daily, and hours vary throughout the year. Exhibits, buildings, and museums are on a schedule that is subject to change, but there is always plenty to see. Check the website for schedules.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • marca's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg

    by marca Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A whole section of town has been restored to a 1774 living history museum. You can go through actual 1774 structures lead by guides in 1774 atire. Great for history buffs. Restaurants in the historic section offer selections from the period.

    Was this review helpful?

  • etherspy's Profile Photo

    Go to Colonial Williamsburg...

    by etherspy Written Aug 24, 2002

    Go to Colonial Williamsburg and Jamestown.

    In Jamestown, tour the ships, visit the fort and see the indian village... Take a look at the church!!!

    In Colonial Williamsburg, walk around and suck up all of the smells and sights.
    Paradigm shift... How it was.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Easty's Profile Photo

    Historic Williamsburg

    by Easty Written May 3, 2003
    Main Building at Williamsburg

    Williamsburg is a replica Colonial Village. In my opinion, it is one of the best kept Colonial villages. You can get a feeling of what life was during the 18th Century.

    Was this review helpful?

  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Colonial Williamsburg Supreme Court

    by b1bob Written Oct 18, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Supreme Court dealt with all felonies involving white men. (Slaves were dealt with in the local courts.) This was called the "hanging court" because most felonies were hanging offences.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Williamsburg

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

View all Williamsburg hotels