Organization of American States, Washington D.C.

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  • Museum of the Americas
    Museum of the Americas
    by GentleSpirit
  • Museum of the Americas
    Museum of the Americas
    by GentleSpirit
  • Mexican tile work in the ground floor
    Mexican tile work in the ground floor
    by GentleSpirit
  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Museum of the Americas

    by GentleSpirit Updated Apr 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museum of the Americas
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    The Museum of the Americas is sponsored by the Organization of American States, which showcases the visual arts from all of its member states on a rotating basis in this museum
    Exhibits change every three months..

    The Building itself is small, directly behind the OAS building. For example, what I saw today was an exhibit of sculpture and visual art from Haiti and the Dominican Republic as well as a pretty daring photography exhibit from a Guatemalan artist.

    A Small museum, worth a visit if you are strolling around by the World War II memorial and want to get away from the crowds.

    TIP- take a picture from the ground level facing the garden, when the blossoms are in bloom its gorgeous!

    Location: 201 18th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006
    Hours: 10am-5pm Tue-Sun
    Admission: Free
    Closed: Mondays, Federal Holidays, and Good Friday.
    Parking: Limited, metered street parking in the area.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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  • besbel's Profile Photo

    Organization of American States

    by besbel Updated Aug 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Organization of American States headquarters

    This is one of the most hidden attractions for Washington, despite its closeness to the White House. The Organization of American States is the international organization that brings together the countries of North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, and has its headquartes in Washington DC. The front wall of the main building is carved with relevant scenes for the region, like the meeting between José de San Martín and Simón Bolívar on one side, and George Washington farewell to his generals on the other side. The American Eagle can be found atop the Washington scene, while the Latin American condor sculpture is above the San Martin-Bolivar one.
    In front you can find an sculpture of Queen Isabella the Catholic, who sponsored the Columbus travel that lead to the discovery of America.
    Several cultural events take place at OAS headquarters open to public, and tours for visitors are also offered. If interested in Latin American Art, you can also visit the Museum of the Americas, which is located very close, in 201 18th St.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    Hall of the Americas

    by leafmcgowan Written Jan 13, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The Organization of American States (OAS) brings together the nations of the Western Hemisphere to strengthen cooperation on democratic values, defend common interests and debate the major issues facing the region and the world. The OAS is the region’s principal multilateral forum for strengthening democracy, promoting human rights, and confronting shared problems such as poverty, terrorism, illegal drugs and corruption. It plays a leading role in carrying out mandates established by the hemisphere’s leaders through the Summits of the Americas. The Organization has four official languages — English, Spanish, Portuguese and French — and reflects the rich diversity of the hemisphere’s peoples and cultures. It is made up of 35 member states: the independent nations of North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. The government of Cuba, a member state, has been suspended from participation since 1962; thus only 34 countries participate actively. Nations from other parts of the world participate as permanent observers, which allows them to closely follow the issues that are critical to the Americas. The member countries set major policies and goals through the General Assembly, which gathers the hemisphere’s ministers of foreign affairs once a year in regular session. Ongoing actions are guided by the Permanent Council, made up of ambassadors appointed by the member states. The OAS General Secretariat carries out the programs and policies set by the political bodies.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Organization of American States

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Mar 28, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Organization of American States

    And this is the building where the OAS (Organization of American States) is based. It's beautiful inside, as it has many typical elements of Latin American colonial architecture, and it has many luxurious rooms as well. Please look at the picture on the next tip to see one of them.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Inside the OAS

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Apr 27, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Within the OAS walls...

    One of the nicest rooms within the OAS building. You definitely have to visit this place; right on the back part of it there's a Latin American Modern Art museum which is small but also worth a visit!

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  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Organization of the American States

    by seagoingJLW Written Jan 27, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Organization of American States

    This building is located on 17th Street and Constitution Ave. NW. The entrance hall is a tropical patio.

    There is a Hall of Heroes and Flags, the liberator Simon Bolivar Room, the Hall of the Americas, and an Aztec garden.

    Tours can be arranged by appointment.
    Phone: 202-458-3000

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