Capitol Hill Historic District, Washington D.C.

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  • Capitol hill
    Capitol hill
    by eternel2002
  • The capitol
    The capitol
    by eternel2002
  • Inside oval room
    Inside oval room
    by albaaust
  • tpangelinan's Profile Photo

    The best deal in town!

    by tpangelinan Written Apr 15, 2005

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    The Spirit of Washington II

    We really had a great time on this trip! Just enough length. The food was excellent. Our sail was a special event, the Cherry Blossom Princesses were on board. What a bunch of beautiful, friendly, well manered young ladies.
    Our waitress was very nice. They sat us next to another couple from California. "Hi Bob and Sharon"! Hope you read this some time! We enjoyed your company!

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    Tour of the Capitol

    by Dabs Updated Nov 4, 2004

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    Congressman Viscloskey from Indiana

    There are two ways of touring the Capitol, one is to contact your Congressman for a VIP tour of the Capitol, the other is to wait in line for same day tickets. I would highly recommend visiting one way or the other, this was one of the most interesting places I visited on this trip!

    I was able to get on a VIP tour, since it was October it was easy to do with short notice but contact them as soon as you know you are going. The tour starts in the Congressman's office (Indiana is in the Rayburn Building, the buildings are all in a row). An intern in his office took us to the Capitol where we met our Congressman, had our picture taken with him and then the tour of the Capitol started. We were not able to see where the Senate sits but we did get to see where Congress sits, the Rotunda and the Old Supreme Court (I don't think the general tours go there).

    I've posted a bit more about my visit in my travelogue.

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  • zanzooni's Profile Photo

    Experience the sites, the sounds, the smells..

    by zanzooni Written Mar 28, 2005

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    Can't you just feel the energy?

    Inside Eastern Market are many deli's where one can buy a myriad of meats, flowers, cheeses, and fresh bread, and find the most interesting characters, as I do. This guy actually jumped in front of my camera while I was trying to get another shot, then I called him back and said, Smile, your gonna be on VT.

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    Senate and House Office Buildings

    by b1bob Updated Jun 27, 2006

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    Cannon House Office Building

    Until the early 1900s, Senators and Representatives had their Washington, DC offices inside the Capitol building. It was very convenient to get to the House and Senate floor for votes, but it got crowded in the Capitol building. Congress authorised the construction of buildings nearby, but outside of the Capitol to relieve overcrowding. Now there are a total of 6 congressional office buildings- 3 for the Senate and 3 for the House of Representatives. In the House, they are named for former Speakers Cannon (for Illinois), Longworth (for Ohio), and Rayburn (for Texas). In the Senate, they are named for prominent former Senators Russell (for Georgia), Dirksen (for Illinois), and Hart (for Michigan). Of course, office space, like everything else on Capitol Hill, is determined by party and seniority. The senior members choose the newest, most modern buildings (Rayburn for the House, Hart for the Senate). The odd thing is, when a senior member dies in or otherwise leaves office midterm, the newbie who replaces him gets his posh office digs until the next election when he has to move down to office space more in line with his limited seniority.

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Contact your Congressman or Congresswoman

    by karenincalifornia Updated May 23, 2006

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    Conducting government business on Capitol Hill

    If you are a U.S. citizen, contact your congressman or congresswoman's office ahead of time and arrange a Capitol tour. This will give you cuts in line ahead of all the masses who are waiting in a 90 minute line for a tour. If you do it this way, your tour will be lead by the representative's staffer. Usually, the lowest man or woman on the totem pole gets the tour guide duty. I had to laugh at the thought of the college graduate staffer (no doubt an A student from an excellent university) landing a job on Capitol Hill and getting stuck with playing tour guide to the constituents. In government, I guess everybody has to start somewhere!

    This picture was taken in our congresswoman's office while we waited for another family to show up. The person at the desk on the phone is not our congresswoman, Lynne Woolsey, but yours truly, trying to look like a hot shot politico mover and shaker. That's Washington for you - you leave your seat for one minute and someone is always anxious to move in.

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  • bct341's Profile Photo

    The Capitol.. at night

    by bct341 Updated Oct 12, 2003

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    Capitol at night

    The Capitol building is one of the city's unmistakable landmarks. The cornerstone of the building was laid by George Washington himself in 1793. With the exception of certain extenuating circumstances (when the British burned the Capitol), it has housed the Senate and the House of Representatives since 1800.

    Hours: M-F: 9am-4:30pm
    Until 8pm in summer

    Admission: Free

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    Tour the Capitol Building

    by bct341 Updated Oct 13, 2003

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    Capitol Dome

    The Capitol building is divided into three sections: The North Wing, which houses the Senate, the South Wing for the House of Representatives and the Rotunda. The magnificent Rotunda is the area under the Capitol dome. On its ceiling is Constitino Brumidi's fresco, "Apotheosis of Washington". The bronze 19-foot tall statue, Freedom, tops the dome itself. No building in the District of Colombia is permitted to be taller than the statue, so that nothing may stand above Freedom.

    The 45-minute tour of the Capitol begins in the Rotunda, and makes its way around the halls of the building. Along the way, tour guides point out the historical significance of the paintings and statues that adorn the halls. The tour is very informative and will instill an appreciation for the historical and architectural importance of the country's most recognizable office building.

    Hours:
    M-F: 9am-4:30pm
    Until 8pm in summer

    Admission cost: Free

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  • bct341's Profile Photo

    Capitol Building... Great Architecture

    by bct341 Updated Oct 13, 2003

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    U.S. Capitol

    Take the time to check out the Architecture of the Capitol.. both inside and out. It is defnitely interesting and looks very different from different angles and from each side.
    I recommend that you walk around the outside of it before or after you take a tour of the building.

    Hours: M-F: 9am-4:30pm
    Until 8pm in summer

    Admission: Free

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Capitol Tour

    by karenincalifornia Updated May 25, 2006

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    Capitol, Washington D.C.

    Many other VTers have already taken the time to post great tips about the Capitol, so all I'm going to say is you must do a tour of this building. The US has so few buildings that are this ornate and impressive. You see this type of impressive architecture frequently in Europe, but not so much in the US. The Capitol is in a class by itself.

    You'll also get a mini-history lesson of the early years of the United States. If the House of Representatives is in session, you'll be able to watch the legislators at work. It was not in session for us, but we did get to see a big empty room. Come to think of it, that's not substantially different than when the legislature IS in session.

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    Eastern Market

    by Gypsywmn71 Written Jul 22, 2003

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    Artist's Stand

    Wander around the great neighborhoods on "the Hill" during the weekend and you will stumble upon Eastern Market (off of the blue or orange line metro stop entitled Eastern Market). It is a great place to people watch, look at the talent of local artists (painters, jewelers and sculptures) to sampling the delicious local cooking of bakers and the fresh local produce from farmers in the surrounding suburban areas of Maryland and Virginia.

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    supreme court

    by doug48 Updated Nov 5, 2007

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    supremw court

    the supreme court was established at the philadelphia convention in 1787. the main purpose of the supreme court is to settle constitutional issues. this beautiful corinthain edifice was designed by cass gilbert and was built in 1935. the public is allowed to view supreme court sessons on a first come, first served basis. when the court is not in session there are public lectures about the supreme court in the courtroom. check their website for times and admission information.

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    library of congress

    by doug48 Updated Apr 10, 2008

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    library of congress

    the library of congress was established in 1800 as a government reference library. the library was burned by the british during the war of 1812. thomas jefferson offered his own collection to replace the destroyed books. in 1897 the library moved to a new italian renaissance style building designed by john l. smithmeyer and paul j. peltz. this beautiful building was named the thomas jefferson building after it's benefactor. the library has the largest collection of books in the world. the library is open to the public and you can view a 15th century gutenberg bible and the american treasures exhibit.

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  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    Capitol Hill

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 18, 2011

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    Capitol Hill
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    Purpose of the many parks, medians, circles and squares that come with Capitol Hill is to provide urban greenspace within the City of Washington D.C. for relaxation, aesthetic enjoyment, and historic commemoration.

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  • gosiaPL's Profile Photo

    The streets of Capitol Hill district

    by gosiaPL Written Jan 30, 2005

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    Old house in Capitol Hill

    I think I would miss a lot if I hadn't strolled around the Capitol Hill. Of course, you may get to the historic district just to see the Capitol Building, the Supreme Court or the Library of Congress, but take some more time there to see the human scale architecture, the old houses, the neat front gardens, the tiny stores, people going about their daily business...

    This is a different "face" of Washington D.C. that makes you realise the city is not just about the U.S. governmental bodies, memorials and crowds of tourists - some people actually live there :-)

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    GARFIELD STATUE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    President Garfield stands outside the Capital Bldg

    When visiting the Capitol, wander down towards the Mall. James Garfield, the Nation’s Twentieth President is honored with a statue. He was the second of four Presidents to be assassinated in office (the others being Lincoln, McKinley and Kennedy). Most Americans don’t know much about Garfield today. He didn’t get the chance to serve but for a six months in 1881 following a narrow popular election over Democratic candidate, General Winfield Scott, a Civil War general who had played a role at Gettysburg (While Garfield won the popular vote by only 10000 votes out of 9 million, he cruised in the electoral vote, 214 to 155.). Garfield was shot by a lawyer, Charles Guiteau, who had not been appointed to a desired consular post - Paris. Guiteau figured that Garfield’s Vice President, Chester Arthur, would be so happy in becoming President, that he would appoint Guiteau afterall as a favor (Instead Guiteau was hung the following year.). Garfield died two and a half months later, just as he seemed to be recuperating.

    Garfield is one of several Presidents who have come from the State of Ohio - one of Ohio’s nicknames is the State of Presidents. His home outside of Cleveland is a National Historic Site (http://www.nps.gov/jaga/) and the home - Lawndale - is also the site of the first Presidential Library. He and his wife are buried in nearby Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland. They lie in a large monumental tomb not too far from the last resting places of Carl Stokes, Eliot Ness and John D Rockefeller. It is said that the ghosts of Garfield and Rockefeller enjoin in an occasional game of chess, using the elaborate tombstones as playing pieces. But Garfield’s ghost has also been seen with that of his assassin, Guiteau, wandering about in the basement of the US House of Representatives.
    The statue was erected by both the US Government and the Society of the Army of the Cumberland, the Civil War unit that Garfield campaigned with, rising to the rank of Major General.

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