The National Mall, Washington D.C.

4.5 out of 5 stars 93 Reviews

Downtown Washington D.C. Smithsonian metro stop

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  • The National Mall
    by Ewingjr98
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    The National Mall
    by chewy3326
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    Signers of the Declaration of Independence

    by Ewingjr98 Written Nov 12, 2008

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    The Signers of the Declaration of Independence Monument sits on the Mall, but it seems to be seldom visited because it is off the main path between the World War II Monument and the big monuments around the Lincoln Memorial. This monument, created in 1984, honors the 56 men from the Thirteen Colonies who signed the Declaration of Independence. The signature of each man is reproduced on granite blocks on a small island in the middle of Constitution Gardens.

    Constitution Gardens were also created in 1976 to commemorate the 200 year anniversary of the American Revolution. This area was formed by fill from dredging the Potomac, and after World War I it housed temporary Navy barracks. Finally in 1971 the barracks were removed and the park created. Constitution Gardens were named in 1986 on the 200th anniversary of the ratification of the Constitution.

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    Take a Walking Tour...

    by tspeegle09 Written Jun 30, 2008

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    A walk down the National Mall is all in a day's work, and worth the effort. You can explore the World War II Memorial, Vietnam Memorial, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Capitol building, and a dozen other monuments/statues/memorials/fancy buildings of some kind at your own leisurely pace. Don't bother booking a tour. Just take time to walk, stop, and smell the roses. Comfortable shoes are a MUST, and don't forget to bring your camera and plenty of water.

    Personal photo, October 2007
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    Walking along the National Mall

    by leafmcgowan Written May 26, 2008

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    In the heart of D.C. connecting the Capital building, Washington Monument, and the Lincoln Memorial is a green open-are National Park and recreational strip called "The National Mall". It was originally conceived by Peter Charles L'Enfant during the construction of Washington D.C. in 1791. Because of its size and width, open expanse - its often the site for many protests and rallies. Most popular rallies in the area were the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms, a massive rally for African-American civil rights, at which Martin Luther King Jr gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. In 1969 it was home to the largest officially recorded rally known as the Vietnam War Moratorium. In 2004 the Nation of Islam leader Min Louis Farrakhan was the Million Man March. In 2007 tens of thousands of Iraq War protesters converged here as well. This green strip also serves as a popular spot for picnics, walks, jogs, and kite flying. Each year several events are held here including 4th of July celebrations. In July and August there are annual Screen on the Green movie festivals. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Visited 2007 and 2008.

    National Mall on 5/20/2008 National Mall on 5/20/2008
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    All the Landmarks in DC!

    by machomikemd Written Aug 15, 2007

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    The Mall is a bit like Disneyland, in the sense, that there is no way to fully experience it all in just one day. Part of the original design for the federal city, the massive open space park stretches from the US Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial and around the Tidal Basin to the Jefferson Memorial. It is also where you will find the museums of the Smithsonian, the Vietnam Memorial, the Reflecting Pool and the famous Washington Monument. It was intended to be a place to remember American heroes, to celebrate freedom and to be a forum to exercise freedom in the form of protests and rallies.

    The National Mall is usually the center of every visitor's trip to Washington DC. This tree-lined area of parkland stretches two and a half miles from the Potomac River to the United States Capitol on Capitol Hill and is adjoined by the White House. At one end of the National Mall, known as West Potomac Park, the Lincoln Memorial faces the Reflecting Pool with a good view of Arlington Memorial Bridge, Constitution Gardens, the Tindal Basin and the Washington Monument. Further towards Capitol Hill are a number of museums and galleries, among which are many of the Smithsonian Institution's museums, including the National Museum of Natural History, the National Air and Space Museum, National Museum of the American Indian, and the Smithsonian Institution building. Numerous festivals and concerts take place on the lawn throughout the year. A gravel path encircles the Mall and is a great place for a sightseeing run or walk. You just might run into a Senator. Certainly any visit to Washington DC should start here on the Mall.

    Middle of National Mall Facing Capitol Facing Washington Memorial Facing lincoln Memorial Aerial View of National Mall
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    DC Monuments at Midnight

    by HillyCaye Updated Jul 8, 2007

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    The Monuments are MOST BEAUTIFUL and LEAST CROWDED in the middle of the night. They are lit up, bright white against the pitch black sky and are so much more striking and awe-inspiring. You can visit the monuments at all hours, they don't close to public viewing. Your chances of driving and getting a parking space on The Mall are also much better in the evening/early morning. The Lincoln Memorial is just amazing. Climb up and look out over the reflecting pool at the Washington Monument. It will take your breath away. The Vietnam & Korean War memorials are my favorites. Beautiful but eerie, they really give you a different perspective at night time. The World War II is another memorial to see at night. One of the most overlooked memorials is the Albert Einstein Memorial... you can crawl up into his lap & take a picture. It is a ton of fun to go with friends, and is also very romantic! (I don't recommend going alone, though.)

    My friends sitting in Einstein's lap
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    Independence Day on the Mall

    by Tom_Fields Written Jul 5, 2007

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    To Washington, the high point of the year is 4th of July--Independence Day. And the place to be is on the National Mall. This year, the festivities were almost rained out; as fate would have it, the weather happened to improve just in time for the fireworks.

    And what a show it was! I was lucky enough to get a good position overlooking the Washington Monument. The crowd was enormous. Everyone seemed to enjoy it.

    The streets around the Mall were blocked off. Some people sat down right in the middle of 14th St--not a good idea. The police had to come through just to keep it clear. Please stay on the grass.

    Another tip--take the Metro, because there's nowhere to park. When the show's over, be prepared to stand in line to get back on the Metro. It may take a while just to reach the entrance. Anyway, it's worth seeing this at least once.

    Fireworks What a blast! Still more... Boom! The best fireworks show I've seen
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    National Mall

    by chewy3326 Updated Jan 4, 2007

    The National Mall is one of America’s most interesting parks; the bulk of it lies between the Lincoln Memorial and Capitol Hill, lined by Constitution Ave. and a handful of Smithsonian Museums. Besides visiting the major monuments, memorials, and museums, you can just stroll down along the mall and people-watch; around here, you can meet congressmen, activists, and protestors.

    National Mall The National Mall US Capitol
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    Martin Luther King Jr. Plaque (future memorial)

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 31, 2006

    South of the DC War Memorial and north of the Tidal Basin, you'll find a small plaque dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, leader of the American Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s. The plaque was placed there in 2000; in 2006 (this year, soon to be last year), there was a ceremonial groundbreaking for the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, which will occupy a much larger space on the north side of the Tidal Basin. The memorial will honor a man who brought change with nonviolence, and lost his life to improve the lives of others. However, it will probably take a few more years before actual work on the memorial is started, and even longer until it is finally finished. When it is completed, the memorial will lie on the straight line between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials, symbolizing the work by those three men to provide freedom for all.

    Martin Luther King Jr. Plaque
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    Statue of Alexander Hamilton

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 31, 2006

    Okay, this is actually closer to the White House than the National Mall, but whatever. The Statue of Alexander Hamilton in DC is in front of the US Treasury, near the White House. You can't walk to the base of the statue, since it is behing a fenced, off-limits area in the Treasury, but you can see it and photograph it from outside. Hamilton is the man whose face is on the US ten dollar bill; he was the first Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. He was also a prominent Federalist who was one of the authors of the Federalist Papers (in other words, the Anti-George Mason). Quite an interesting person, quite an interesting statue.

    Alexander Hamilton
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    DC War Memorial

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 30, 2006

    The DC War Memorial, almsost hidden in the woods, is secluded and rarely visited, despite being very near Independence Avenue. It is south of the Reflection Pool and the WWII Memorial. The memorial's design is simple and beautiful; it is a small, white, round, mostly unadorned temple. The memorial was dedicated by Herbert Hoover around 1930, and commemorates the 26,000 young men from Washington DC who served in the first World War. Two National Park Service Interpretive plaques are beside the memorial; this is often a good place to escape the crowds.

    DC War Memorial
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    Nathan Hale Statue

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 29, 2006

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    On the South Side of the Department of Justice Building, on Constitution Ave, you'll find a small statue of Nathan Hale. Hale is not a particularly well-known member of American history, although he had his merits. Born in Coventry, Connecticut, he was a captain in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. He was also America's first spy. However, while on a mission in New York in 1776, he was caught by the British and hanged. His last words were, "My only regret is that I have but a single life to give for my country." This quote immortalized him, and got him a statue in DC. The statue's not particularly large or prominent, so you'll have to look for it; it's right behind the National Museum of Natural History.

    Nathan Hale
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    4th of July Fireworks

    by binkieloo Written Sep 28, 2006

    I have now done this three times, and I can not express how much fun it is.

    The Smithsonian Cultural Festival is on at the same time and provides entertainment during the day. I do recommend getting to the Mall early in order to find the perfect spot. We arrived at around 3pm in 2006. In 2005 my sister and I spent the day on the Mall - attending the parade and trying to fit a few SI museums in too. We found our spot on the Mall around 5pm. I don't remember what time I got there in 1999, but there wasn't as much security to get through then.

    Do be aware that Security is tight, be sure to look up the current restrictions when you go.

    Fireworks Picnic on the mall Capitol Crowds Fireworks Fireworks
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    Monuments Around the Capitol

    by Tom_Fields Written Sep 8, 2006

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    While visiting the US Capitol, be sure to take in the nearby grounds, with their many historic monuments. They add immensely to the experience.

    Most prominent, of course, is the statue of General Ulysses S. Grant. During the Civil War, this Union general took Vicksburg, Mississippi. This gave the Union control of the Mississippi River; together with the Battle of Gettysburg, it spelled the doom of the Confederacy. Later, Grant became President. This statue, from 1920, is by Henry Merwin Shrady, and the architecture by Edward Casey. Around the statue of General Grant are others dedicated to his valiant soldiers.

    Nearby is a statue of James Garfield (1831-1881). A Civil War hero, he was 20th president of the United States. He was assassinated by a disgruntled Federal job seeker.

    To the northwest of the Capitol is the Peace Monument, by Franklin Simmons. Carved in 1878, it is dedicated to the sailors killed in the Civil War.

    To the north, near the Japanese-American War Memorial, is the statue of Senator Robert Taft. Son of President William Howard Taft, he served in the Senate from 1938 to 1953. It was funded by donations from every state.

    General Grant's Statue Dramatic Civil War monument Monument to President James Garfield The Peace Monument Monument to Senator Robert Taft
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    Museum of the American Indian

    by Tom_Fields Updated Sep 8, 2006

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    After all that the Indians have suffered in this country, it's about time that they had their own museum. Here it is, on the National Mall.

    Note the odd, curvelinear shapes. The inside is the same way; there is hardly a straight line to be seen. This makes the visitor go in unpredictable directions, rather than simply following a direct route. There is information on all the major tribes, although it's hard to learn about some of the more obscure ones. The art and other displays are intriguing, unusual, and at times very moving.

    If you're hungry, visit the cafeteria for some authentic American Indian cuisine. Some may be familiar, while other dishes are quite exotic. People take for granted many foods that the Indians gave to the world--such as corn, chili peppers, and potatoes.

    Museum of the American Indian The pool in front of the building The pond behind the museum Looking up at the dome The lobby, with its Indian boats
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    Bartholdi Park

    by Tom_Fields Written Sep 8, 2006

    Across from the US Botanic Garden is Bartholdi Park. While visiting the Botanic Garden, this is the perfect place to go before or after. It's small, modest, but very charming. It was created in 1932, and named for Frederic Auguste Bartholdi (1834-1904), the sculptor who designed the fountain in the center.

    Bartholdi Park The Heritage Garden The Palette Garden
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