The White House, Washington D.C.

4 out of 5 stars 128 Reviews

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue 202-208-1631

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  • aero198's Profile Photo

    The White House

    by aero198 Updated Sep 9, 2007
    The White House
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    The house of government, it's located near the Washington Monument. I think you can get some visitor passes (athought I didn't tried).

    Heavy security is around the building and you get to see the front of The White House from far away! ;)

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    White House Visitor's Center

    by machomikemd Written Aug 14, 2007

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    Front of White House Visitors Center
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    The Visitor Center opened in 1995 to provide extensive interpretive data about the White House and to serve as a ticket-distribution center (though that function is suspended indefinitely). It is run under the auspices of the National Park Service and the staff is particularly well informed. Try to catch the 30-minute video about the White House, Where History Lives, which provides interior views of the presidential precincts (it runs continuously throughout the day). Before you leave the Visitor Center, pick up a copy of the National Park Service's brochure on the White House, which tells you a little about what you'll see in the eight or so rooms you tour and a bit about the history of the White House. The White House Historic Association runs a small shop here. The association operates an informative website.

    Walk through six permanent exhibits relating to the White House including the First Families In the White House, Symbols and Images, White House Architecture, White House Interiors, Working White House, and Ceremonies and Celebration.

    The Center is open seven days a week from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. and features many aspects of the White House, including its architecture, furnishings, first families, social events, and relations with the press and world leaders, as well as a thirty-minute video. Allow between 20 minutes to one hour to explore the exhibits. The White House Historical Association also sponsors a sales area. restrooms are available, but food service is not, but just outside are a lot of food carts selling a variety of goodies.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Symbol of the Most Powerful Office!

    by machomikemd Written Aug 14, 2007

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    What a View!
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    The second president, John Adams, was the first to live in the White House in 1801 - George Washington never resided here. Originally called the "Executive Mansion," it earned the nickname "White House" after its marble exterior was whitewashed to cover burn marks from damage by the War of 1812. Student and military veteran group tours are available with advance notice. The White House occasionally closes without notice for official functions.

    It is the official home and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. The house is built of white-painted Aquia sandstone in the late Georgian style. It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. As the office of the United States President, the term "White House" is used as a metonym for a United States president's administration, the Executive Office of the President. The property is owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park.

    the small group of buildings housing the presidency is known as the White House Complex. It includes the central Executive Residence flanked by the East Wing and West Wing. Day to day household operations are coördinated by the Chief Usher. Few people realize the size of the White House, since much of it is below ground or otherwise concealed by landscaping. The White House includes: Six stories and 55,000 ft² (5,100 m²) of floor space, 132 rooms and 35 bathrooms, 412 doors, 147 windows, twenty-eight fireplaces, eight staircases, three elevators, five full-time chefs, a tennis court, a (single-lane) bowling alley, a movie theater, a jogging track, a swimming pool, and a putting green.

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  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    Visit the White House

    by joiwatani Written Aug 12, 2007

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    The White House, January 1993
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    I thought that the White House is this huge building because it is so famous around the world. But, it was just an ordinary building. It is the people who lives in there that makes it really famous! The security is very strict and the line is long so I didn't really go inside. I took pictures outside and moved on! (I was there in 1993 so the security was not as tough as today!)

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    The President's Pad

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 13, 2007

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    National Park Service photo

    The White House was constructed between 1792 and 1800. After being burned by British soldiers during the War of 1812 ot was reconstructed, and it has been the home of every president of the United States since John Adams. The exterior of the main structure, despite some additions and minor changes, remains much as it was in 1800. During the Truman administration, the Truman's had to move to Blair House while the termite damage was repaired because Truman's piano was in danger of falling through the floor.

    The White House is open again for historical walking tours. I am not absolutely sure that I have toured the White House, but I think maybe I did. It is now called The President's Park and is under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service. I don't have, or can't find, a photo, so the National Park Service has made available photos to be used as long as you give them credit for the photo.

    The NPS website says: Public tours of the White House are available for groups of 10 or more people. Requests must be submitted through one's Member of Congress and are accepted up to six months in advance. These self-guided tours are available from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday (excluding federal holidays), and are scheduled on a first come, first served basis approximately one month in advance of the requested date. Tours are always subject to cancellation.

    Operating Hours & Seasons

    WHITE HOUSE VISITOR CENTER Daily; 7:30 am - 4:00 pm Closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day & New Year's Day

    ELLIPSE VISITOR PAVILION Daily; 8:00 am - 3:00 pm Closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day & New Year's Day

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  • April1985's Profile Photo

    The White House

    by April1985 Written Apr 4, 2007
    The White House

    You have to visit where the president lives ! After all, its what most people think of when they hear "Washington DC ! " You can get a tour through out the white house, or just stand out side and take pictures through the fence . Which ever you choose, its nice to know you can see it , and it is very beautiful from up so close !

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    White House Visitor Center

    by jamiesno Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    Just next door to the White House there is a visitor center with information about the White House itself. There is lots of information about the architecture, the Presidents who lived there, the way it was build, some artifacts and so on.

    Out of everything I seen in the visitor center I thought the photographs of the White House staff where the most interesting and gave it a more human perspective. Many of the employees at the White House have been employed there spanning decades as butlers, gardeners, cooks, carpenters, administration, engineering and the list goes on.

    There photographs at the visitor center were very well done.

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  • NC_Ziggy's Profile Photo

    The White House

    by NC_Ziggy Updated Feb 3, 2007

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    HuH?  It's Nuclear, not Nucular!  Need I Say More?
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    Ok, I know we're not supposed to be political here, but Cheese Whiz! What's a country have to do to get a break? I do pray for our president as he IS our president. I hope it's ok to pray for his wisdom, judgement and for 2008 to get here quick! And that's all I have to say about that...

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    The White House

    by leafmcgowan Updated Jan 14, 2007

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    For two hundred years, the White House has stood as a symbol of the Presidency, the United States government, and the American people. Its history, and the history of the nation’s capital, began when President George Washington signed an Act of Congress in December of 1790 declaring that the federal government would reside in a district "not exceeding ten miles square…on the river Potomac." President Washington, together with city planner Pierre L’Enfant, chose the site for the new residence, which is now 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Construction began when the first cornerstone was laid in October of 1792. Although President Washington oversaw the construction of the house, he never lived in it. It was not until 1800, when the White House was nearly completed, that its first residents, President John Adams and his wife, Abigail, moved in. Since that time, each President has made his own changes and additions. The White House is, after all, the President’s private home. It is also the only private residence of a head of state that is open to the public, free of charge.Public tours of the White House are available for groups of 10 or more people. Requests must be submitted through one's Member of Congress and are accepted up to six months in advance. These self-guided tours are available from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday (excluding federal holidays), and are scheduled on a first come, first served basis approximately one month in advance of the requested date. We encourage you to submit your request as early as possible since a limited number of tours are available. All White House tours are free of charge.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    Nation's Christmas Tree

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 29, 2006

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    Nation's Christmas Tree

    In the Ellipse, just outside the White House, is the Nation's Christmas Tree. Christmas Trees at the White House have been a tradition since the 1920's, when Calvin Coolidge began planting Christmas trees here. At first, a tree was cut annually, but eventually it was decided that a single tree would be brought, and would be planted and kept. At Christmastime, the President lights the tree. I came not long after Christmas, so the lights and ornaments were still on the tree.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    White House Visitor Center

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 29, 2006

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    White House Visitor Center
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    Since most visitors to Washington, DC will not be able to enter the White House, the best alternative is a visit to the White House Visitor Center, which provides a good overview about the White House and its history. Like most other museums, security here is tight; no over-sized packs or food or drinks. Inside the visitor center, there's various exhibits about the rooms of the White House, and the people who have lived there. Many of the rooms in the White House are named for their color- the Red Room, the Green Room, the Blue Room. There are also staterooms and oval rooms. In the early 20th century, the botanic garden west of the White House was torn down and replaced with a temporary wing. However, the temporary wing became permenant, and is today's West Wing, the true seat of power in the White House. In the West Wing there is the Oval Office, the president's executive office. There's also plenty about first ladies and presidential traditions, etc.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    1600 Pennsylvania Avenue

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 29, 2006

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    The White House

    This mansion is perhaps the best known in the world; this is the house that contains (most of) the executive power of the United States. And it is... the White House (big surprise here). The White House is the home of the president and the first family of the United States of America. It was completed in 1800, and John Adams (the second president) became its first resident. The house has quite a bit of history; in 1814, the British burned the house down after they captured Washington in the War of 1812, though Dolley Madison, first lady at the time, saved some important artifacts, documents, etc. It was rebuilt and still stands today. However, although the White House belongs to the people of the US, it is quite difficult to enter the building. To get tickets for a White House Tour, you must contact your congressperson a month beforehand and request them; then there's a background check, etc, and if everything looks good, you get free tickets. I, however, did not call my congresswoman (and therefore did not take a tour of this house).

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  • The White House

    by charrie Written Jul 10, 2006

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    The White House and my children in front of it

    The White House is so cool to see in person. Unfortunately, we were only 4 people, not 10, so we couldn't even think about requesting a tour of any kind. I was disappointed in the behavior of the others taking pictures, very rude. I was also kind of bummed when a Secret Service Agent wouldn't let me take his picture. I understand, though. We didn't even make it to the visitor's center in time, it closed at 4p and we got there at 4:05. Who wouldv'e thought it would close so early?

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    IS THE WHITE HOUSE REALLY WHITE?

    by moiraistyx Written Jun 22, 2006

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    The Front View of the White House
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    When I first arrived in DC, I was told that I would never be able to get any where near the
    White House. This was due to all the chaos that came about from the attacks on September 11, 2001. I was pleasantly surprised that not only did I get to view the White House from the back, but I was also able to see it from the front. I didn't get to see President Bush though, that would have made the experience better. The only things I was annoyed about seeing the White House, was that other tourist were very rude to each other here. It was like a picture taking free for all and people were nasty about it and inconsiderate too.

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  • Taffster's Profile Photo

    The White House

    by Taffster Written Jun 19, 2006

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    The White House

    When in Washington, you must visit the White House! It’s quite a surreal feeling and my family were quite impressed when I sent a text message back home saying that I was sat on a wall in front of the White House. The architecture is beautiful and they’ve even done a pretty good job of putting it back together after the aliens blew it up on Independence Day ;o)

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