U.S. Holocaust Museum, Washington D.C.

34 Reviews

100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW (202) 488-0400

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  • Hall Of Remembrance
    Hall Of Remembrance
    by mindcrime
  • U.S. Holocaust Museum
    by Ewingjr98
  • man's inhumanity to man!
    man's inhumanity to man!
    by machomikemd
  • doug48's Profile Photo

    united states holocaust memorial museum

    by doug48 Updated Sep 12, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    holocaust museum

    the u.s.h.m.m is a fasinating and disturbing history of nazi germany and the holocaust. to see the permanent exhibit you get a ticket at the information counter on the main floor. you are then given a "passport" which is a copy of a ID card and brief biography of a victim of the holocaust. then you take an elevator to the fourth floor to begin the tour of the museum. the fourth floor has videos and exhibits on the rise of nazism in germany. there are also exhibits on nazi race classification and antisemitism. the third floor is devoted to the "final solution" or the extermination of the jews in europe. the exhibits also touch on the fate of other targeted groups such as the mentially impared, homosexuals, gypysies, and jehovah's witnesses. the most disturbing exhibits are a box car that took victims to the concentration camps, and collections of personal effects that once belonged to victims of the holocaust. a must see site for students of 20th century history. i would not recomend this museum for young children. the admission is free but during peak tourist periods tickets to the permanent collection must be reserved in advance.
    on june 9 th 2009 an elderly deranged white supremacist shot and killed a security guard at the main entrance to the museum. this insane act will probably increase security at the museum. in planning a visit to the holocaust museum check their web site for security updates.

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  • US Holocaust Museum

    by JohnLeee Written Mar 24, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In his review, MindCrime wrote: "...Of course it’s devoted to the holocaust in Europe in case you think there was any US holocaust!"

    Mind you, MindCrime, that the mass destruction of Native Americans was indeed genocide, a horrific holocaust of its own kind, and what about the enslavement of Africans and the discrimination against them in the US? They're both absolutely horrific events in history, together with the Jewish Holocaust in Europe.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Holocaust museum

    by mindcrime Written Nov 9, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    U.S. Holocaust museum
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    The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum is the best museum of its kind by far. Of course it’s devoted to the holocaust in Europe in case you think there was any US holocaust! The ugly building(pic 1) isn’t attractive and the security people at the entrance (you have to go through screening, not even bottles of water allowed inside!) were super extra non friendly.

    At the main floor (pic 2) you will get the museum plan and other info (no photos at permanent gallery) as well a passport which is actually a copy of an ID card with a small biography of a holocaust victim!

    Then we went up to the upper floor where you can see exhibits (in chronological display), these are pictures, written info and videos about the rise of Nazis in Germany and how the anti-Semitism growth slowly in the society. At the end you will also pass through the section which is about what they called Final Solution which was of course the extermination of jews, gypsies and others like the disabled people!.

    The whole experience is quite astonishing, some exhibits/pictures are disturbing so maybe very young children shouldn’t be here. The museum is open daily 10.00-17.20 with free entrance. I’ve heard that during high season there is time ticketing but in late September we just walked in like in any other museum.

    At the end you can visit the Hall Of Remembrance(pic 4), you can take photos there but without flash.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    by Ewingjr98 Written Apr 4, 2009

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    I never heard of the US Holocaust, so I was a bit confused about this museum that memorializes the US Holocaust. Turns out this museum in the US is about the German holocaust. Does Germany have a museum dedicated to American slavery? Maybe they could call it the German Slavery Museum. Have you ever visited the US Slavery Museum or the American Indian Atrocities Museum on the National Mall in DC? Funny how we focus so much attention on other nations' tragic histories while ignoring our own.

    Anyway, this great museum is located along the National Mall near the Washington Monument and the Tidal Basin. It opened in 1993, and I visited about a year later.

    The museum's main feature is the Permanent Exhibition that has chronological displays of the history of the holocaust in Europe under Nazi Germany. This area also includes the "Tower of Faces," which shows daily life in a Lithuanian town before the residents were executed. The last big element of the museum is the memorial Hall of Rememberance

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    the Depravity of Hitler and the Final Solution

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 1, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    man's inhumanity to man!

    This memorial to Man's Inhumanity to Man is a tribute to remembering the tragic persecution of the European Jews by Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany, sadly there are lots of Holocaust Deniers like The President of Iran but also one must remember that what the Jews are doing to the Palestinians now are like what the Nazis are doing to them before. Again Sadly, one can believe in the saying that "the slaves of today are the oppressors of tomorrow".

    Open: Every day, except Yom Kippur and Christmas
    Hours: 10 AM to 5:30 PM.
    Admission: Free

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  • tspeegle09's Profile Photo

    Hayo, Haya

    by tspeegle09 Written Jun 30, 2008
    A hall of the dead

    Let's be real: the Nazi Holocaust was a pretty unforgettable and fascinating phenomenon, albeit depressing and regrettable. It's an important part of our world's history, and since the permanent collection at the Holocaust museum is free to view, you really have nothing to lose. It may seem a little dark and dreary, but I think it's a great place to take the kids, and I hope to take my children here someday. Plus the museum shop really does have some nice gifts, including some handmade items imported from Jerusalem and books printed in Hebrew. They have some interesting traveling exhibitions from time to time as well.

    BEWARE: If you're a hardcore WWII/Nazi/Holocaust history buff, you might find some of the info presented at the museum to be a bit misleading. It's not that it's necessarily inaccurate, but the business of politics has prevented it from being as in-your-face accurate as it could be. Don't let this stop you from visiting, though...it's a worthwhile experience.

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  • Tdawg40sw's Profile Photo

    US Holocaust Memorial Museum

    by Tdawg40sw Written Apr 18, 2008
    US Holocaust Memorial Museum

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has numerous exhibits, focused around the main permanent exhibit entitled "The Holocaust." This exhibit spans 3 floors of the museum and focuses on the Nazi's atrocities during world war two. The main exhibit is self guided and take several hours. This is the best exhibit of it's kind I have seen, but be warned, the images can be graphic and the exhibit is not recommended for children under 11 years old.

    The Museum also has several other exhibits including Daniel's Story, which is how children experienced the holocaust. There are also special exhibitions that are at the museum for a limited time.

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  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    Memorial to the Innocent Slaughtered Ones

    by TexasDave Written Mar 9, 2008
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    This is not a fun museum, but a very educational one, focusing on the Holocaust during WW II. The design is very stark, highlighting the horrible experiences had in German concentration camps. Free timed tickets can be obtained in the morning, giving you a specific time to start the tour. There are still some survivors who make themselves available to talk about their personal ordeals. Information is presented about the millions of Jews, Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses and others who were mistreated in these camps.

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  • dln6874's Profile Photo

    US Holocaust Museum

    by dln6874 Written Nov 15, 2007

    Yesterday I visited the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. It's my second time there, but probably it will not be my last. It is such a comprehensive museum that I am always learning something new there. Museums are typically educational anyways, but I think this one is especially good. It starts with the rise of Hitler and takes you through the atrocities carried out by the Nazis, all the way to the liberation of the prisoners. Artifacts, photos, and audio help you to understand better what it was like during this period. Various thoughts and recollections by survivors of the holocaust are also on display and add emotion to your experience.

    The quality of the museum can be attested by its popularity. It's one of the few museums in DC for which you have to get a timed entry ticket for. On weekends, you may expect a line outside to get through security, though it will go pretty fast. You can get same day tickets for free at the museum, or you can get them on-line for a small fee ($3). Expect to spend 2-3 hours there.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    A Sobering Experience

    by Tom_Fields Written Oct 7, 2007
    The US Holocaust Museum
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    Most museums, monuments, and exhibits on the Mall commemorate humanity's achievements. The US Holocaust Museum is a reminder of how cruel and inhumane people can be. Even after over 60 years, it's hard to believe that people are capable of carrying out such atrocities. And, as the museum tells us, such things have occurred since then--in such places as the Balkans, the Middle East, Darfur, and Southeast Asia, to name a few places.

    Visitors are issued an identity card, which has the history of a real individual who was in the infarmous concentration camps. The entire sordid story of the Holocaust unfolds before you as you tour the Permanent Exhibition. No photos are allowed in here (it's too dark and crowded to get any good ones, anyway).

    In addition, the Wexner Learning Center is a valuable resource for historical research. The Children's Tile Wall has tiles painted by local school children. There are side exhibits, such as one about a Jewish boy named Daniel who survived the Holocaust while most of his family perished.

    The resistance to the Holocaust is also described. This includes the heroic deeds of Allied spies, Jewish partisan fighters, and those who helped some Jews to escape from the Nazis. One was Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who used his influence and know-how to smuggle thousands of refugees out of Nazi-held Europe.

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  • besbel's Profile Photo

    Holocaust Museum

    by besbel Updated Sep 18, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Holocaust Museum-Hall of Remembrance

    Think about what you saw at the Holocaust Museum.
    This is the museum slogan, found at the entrance and in the bags of the gift shop.
    And they really do their best so we could think about it.
    I would recommend visiting this museum in a half day, without any other museum or touristic activity scheduled, because the whole experience is quite astonishing. No matter how many times you heard about the Holocaust, and how sure we are that this is something we cannot repeat again, it will always be shocking to see the panels, the stories, the badges with the Star of David, the cups that children carried to their execution places thinking that they would get soup, the personal belongings that many Jews left before being gassed, even a couple of diaries from people in the ghettos. Most importantly, how society took so long to react, in the same way they do nowadays, in cases of extermination and genocide.
    The entrance is free, but you gotta make a line to get tickets. It's advised to go early, because tickets are for later. I went on a Saturday, arrived at 10 am and got a ticket for 12:30, but there were other people arriving a bit later than me that got tickets for 4 pm. After the main exhibition, you can find the Hall of Remembrance, where some stop to reflect and pay their respect to the victims. There are also lectures and exhibitions, mostly on genocide and mass killings (e.g. Srebenica, Darfur), that make me wonder if this museum will eventually turn into a genocide museum.

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  • uysijessa's Profile Photo

    remembering the holocaust

    by uysijessa Written Aug 14, 2007

    if there's any visit that truly shook me while visiting d.c it was a visit to the US holocaust museum. to learn more about my tour of the museum do view my travelogue. but believe me, this tour is totally worth it!

    admission is free but you need passes to view the permanent exhibition, The Holocaust. The Holocaust presents a comprehensive history through artifacts, photographs, films, and eyewitness testimonies and is divided into three sections presented chronologically.

    same-day passes are distributed and distribution starts at 10am. passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis and are timed at 15-minute intervals between 10am and 3:45pm.

    allot half a day for a visit to this museum.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    by jamiesno Updated Mar 2, 2007

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    This museum is one of the most important ones in Washington and no matter how much you feel you know about the Holocaust it is worth visiting and putting things into perspective; They also emphasis current world crises such as the problems occurring in the Darfur region of Sudan which helps.

    During my visit there was a special exhibit called the Storey of Daniel a young child who survived the Holocaust and it illustrates through his journal the good life he had that eventually turned to the loss of his mother, sister and his father’s death in the concentration camps. This was a very good exhibit.

    Another exhibit that I felt was effective was a presentation dedicated to the Protocols of Zion, a propaganda tool used to convince people that the Jewish has a plan to take over the world. During the war I could see how this would have been effective but what got my attention and find alarming is the fact that if you do a search on the Internet these protocols remain prominent today throughout the world and there are even governments that teach them. It is alarming that racism is still what it is in our world.

    The permanent exhibit at the museum follows a chronological illustration of the war and lets you get a graphic illustration of what happened; other things that have become imprinted in my head where the looting, the display of shoes and the pictures that showed all the tattoos people where given. The survivors still have to wear them today.

    There was also a model display of killing centers and how they would try to convince people they were going for a sanitary shower. Another sad illustration is of the Nazi program to kill disabled people and the sick in the hospitals. There is more and more at this museum and I encourage you to visit.

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  • NC_Ziggy's Profile Photo

    Identification Card of Miksa Deutsch

    by NC_Ziggy Written Feb 3, 2007

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    100 Raoul Wallenberg Place

    Name: Miksa Deutsch
    Date of Birth: June 24, 1897
    Place of Birth: Bistrita, Romania

    Miksa was the youngest of four children born to religious Jewish parents. The Deutches lived in the town of Bistrita in Transylvania, a region of Romania that belonged to Hungary until 1918. After 1910, the family lived in nearby Viseu de Sus. In 1922, Miksa moved to Budapest, Hungary where he and his older brother, Pal, opened a business selling matches. In 1928 Miksa married Kornelia Mahrer.

    1933-1939: Miksa and Kornelia had three children whom they raised with a religious education. Miksa and his brother were the sole distributors in Hungary of Swedish-made matches, and the business prospered. In May 1939 the Hungarian government enacted a law that limited the number of Jews who could be employed in Hungarian businesses, forcing Miksa to fire some of his Jewish employees.

    1940-1944: In 1940, Miksa was conscripted into the Hungarian army's labor service. Two years later, he was forced to surrender control of his business to a brother of the Hungarian Prime Minister. In October 1944 Miksa began to fear deportation and he briefly left his labor unit to visit his wife, who gave him a Swedish safe-conduct pass she had received from a friend. When Miksa returned to the labor unit on October 31, a Hungarian officer tore up his pass and ordered him deported along with the others. On November 10, 1944 Miksa wrote to his wife that he was being force-marched from Hungary to Austria. He died in the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria at the age of 47.

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  • NC_Ziggy's Profile Photo

    U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum- Not to be Missed

    by NC_Ziggy Written Feb 3, 2007

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    No Need for Words... Let the Silence Speak for You

    Words do not begin to describe a visit to the Holocaust Museum, and I dare say that fewer words are spoken in this location than any other place in all of Washington, DC.

    As opposed to most museums in the area, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is privately funded and not at all a part of the U.S. government. No photograhpy, video or audio recording is allowed and rightfully so, as some images are better served becoming a part of one's memory. This is just such a place.

    As you begin your tour of the Museum, each person is given an "Identification Card." However, it's not your Identification Card but one of a real person who lived during the Holocaust. As I consider my visit to the Holocaust Museum a "private" experience and not one to be shared as any mere tourist destination, I have decided to share with you the person who's Identification Card I received, as this tells much more about this place and its dedication to one of the most horrific periods in the sorry history of mankind.

    Please see the following tip for this as space will not allow here

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