Washington Monument, Washington D.C.

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 115 Reviews

Constitution Avenue & 15th Street (202) 426 - 6841

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  • The Washington Monument
    The Washington Monument
    by GentleSpirit
  • the massive Washington Monument
    the massive Washington Monument
    by richiecdisc
  • This is what the Washington Memorial looks like no
    This is what the Washington Memorial...
    by GentleSpirit
  • starship's Profile Photo

    The Iconic Washington Monument

    by starship Updated Nov 9, 2013

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monument Repair Work After 2011Earthquake

    Shortly after arriving in the Washington, D.C., our bus driver let us off on Independence Avenue between 15th and 17th Streets. Nearby stands one of the most widely recognized monuments in the country -- the towering obelisk known as the "Washington Monument."

    The initial inspiration to honor the country's first president, George Washington, was proposed by Congress in 1783 but it wasn't until Washington's death in 1799, that momentum for its construction in earnest took hold. As is the case with many important works, a monument design competition decided the eventual architect which was Robert Mills. His successor for the project was Lt. Col. Thomas L. Casey who altered Mill's original vision for the monument. The advancement of the construction faltered at times because of lack of funds, and most assuredly by the Civil War between the states.

    Constructed largely of white marble and granite quarried from states from Maryland to Maine, the monument's height is recorded as 555, 5 1/8ft. When it was built between 1848 and 1884, it was considered the tallest structure in the world. There are 896 steps leading to the observation level with a magnificent view. Also worth seeing are the 193 memorial stones in the interior walls which were gifts of states, cities, individuals, societies and countries from around the world!

    The Monument is presently closed!! On August 23, 2011, a 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Virginia approximately 85 miles southwest of Washington, D.C. severely damaged the monument. The monument has been closed to the public since that time as assessments and damage repair has been taking place. Ironically, a restoration project had recently been completed in 2000. Now as you can see in the accompanying photo, the monument is surrounded by scaffolding once again during its current repair.

    When the monument re-opens (date unknown), it is imporant for visitors to know that they will still be required to obtain FREE but timed tickets for admission. These tickets can be obtained at the "Washington Monument Lodge" on 15th Street. Lodge hours are 9:00am to 10:00pm with the last tour time at 9:45pm ( May to September); 9:00am to 5:00pm with the last tour time 4:45pm the rest of the year. Center entry restrictions apply. Reserved tickets can be obtained online but a service charge per ticket will apply. At the Washington Monument Lodge, you'll also find an interesting bookstore selling books on history, gifts, toys and collectibles.

    Rounding the walkway southwest you will find the "Survey Lodge" which serves as a Park Ranger Station. There's you'll find a friendly Park Ranger who will answer all your questions, give you maps, directions and other information of surrounding attractions and there are free, clean restrooms.

    From the Monument, it was a short walk to our next stop, so follow me to The United States Holocaust Museum.

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  • DEBBBEDB's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument Scaffolded

    by DEBBBEDB Written Aug 4, 2013
    From the Lincoln Memorial
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    Because of an unexpected earthquake August 23, 2011, when we visited in 2013, the Washington Monument was enclosed completely in scaffolding. For the time being, you can only see the Monument from the outside.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument

    by antistar Written Jun 12, 2013
    The Washington Monument, Washington D.C.
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    It took a long time but it got there in the end. For twenty years after the first stone was laid in 1848 it was merely a stump. Twenty years after that it was finally built - becoming the tallest building in the world. For a year. After that it was overtaken by the Eiffel Tower. If only it could have been built sooner.

    The problem was always money. They started building the monument with just $87,000 dollars hoping the construction itself would attract more donations. But they dried up. In desperation the planners called on the people of America to donate stone - to save costs and generate interest. This pulled in stones from states all over the US, even the Ryukyu kingdom, an island chain now part of modern day Japan, donated stone.

    These stones were useless for the outside of the tower, because they were all made of different shades. So instead they were placed on the inside. Some bore inscriptions, like one sent all the way from Wales: "Fy iaith, fy ngwlad, fy nghenedl Cymru – Cymru am byth" (my language, my land, my nation of Wales). Even the external stones today are not uniformly white - the lower third, the original stump, is a different shade to the rest. That's because they could never find again, after a twenty year break, the exact same stone they had originally used.

    Maybe waiting would have been a better idea after all.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jan 11, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Washington Monument

    One of the most recognizable landmarks in Washington, this is the tallest pure stone structure and the largest obelisk in the world. (169.294 meters, 555 feet). It honors the first President of the Republic, George Washington.

    Visiting the monument-
    You can get tickets by reserving online, though this carries a non-refundable fee.
    Otherwise, you can get tickets at the lodge adjoining the Monument. These are free on a first-come first served basis. Lines are usually pretty long, so start early!
    ***there is a security screening****

    There are no bathrooms in the Monument. Use the lodge on 15th street.

    You will ride the elevator up. Then once you are done you will have to go down a few sets of stairs until the 490 foot level. arrangements are available for people with limited mobility.
    ***great place to take pictures****

    I don't know if they will let you go down the stairs all the way anymore, I remember doing that when i was a teenager. I know they have limited that in recent years because too many out of shape people tried to go down the stairs and had to have the rangers or emergency personnel come and get them.

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  • lmkluque's Profile Photo

    The Washington Monument

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 14, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View down the Mall

    Washington Monument National Park. A structure on the Washington Mall. It is over five hundred feet tall, built in the nineteenth century in honor of our first president, George Washington. In shape it is an obelisk — a four-sided shaft with a pyramid at the top.

    Dedicated in 1885 and opened to the public in 1888 the 555-foot marble obelisk was built in starts and stops due to lack of funding and one time because of Civil War.

    There appears to be a “water mark/line” about a third of the way up, actually, they ran out of the first type of granite and had to use another.

    Take the elevator to the top of the Washington Monument for a spectacular view of the city's most famous sites.

    Update:

    Due to damage from a nearby 5.8 earthquake on August 23, 2011, the Washington Monument is closed. You can still see it, just can't go up the elevator yet. Before you go to D.C. chech with the Washington Monument's News Release page.

    At the opposite end of the monumental core stood the Washington Monument, anchoring the two axes of power--the Capitol and the White House. However, the Monument had been built a few hundred yards off the White House's sight lines.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument= IMPORTANT UPDATE

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 10, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Washington Memorial March 2013
    1 more image

    Update- July 10,2012
    Local news stations reported that the Washington Monument will remain closed to visitors through 2014. Apparently the damage from the earthquake was far more substantial than originally thought.

    October 2011
    The Washington Monument remains closed to visitors until further notice. Recently, TV news showed engineers rappelling down the monument, checking the stones in detail with small hammers. No further information has been released about structural damage. Because of the large number of visitors this monument receives the authorities are being as careful as possible before deciding to reopen the monument.

    August 25,2011
    Engineers found at least 4 "significant" cracks in the Washington Monument. The Monument remains closed and no word has been given about how long it will be closed or when the repairs might take place.

    The Washington Monument is closed indefinitely as a result of the August 23, 2011 earthquake that affected this area. New organizations report that structural engineers found a crack in the monument and have closed it in the interests of public safety.

    an outside engineering firm will further study the crack and implement solutions.
    at this point nobody knows how long the monument will be closed

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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    PHOTOGRAPHIC OPPORTUNITIES

    by davidjo Written Mar 29, 2012
    THE REFLECTING POOL

    The construction started in 1848 with the excavation of the foundations and was completed in 1884 after many delays due to funding, design arguments and even the removal of sections due to inferior concrete. I searched for the best place for a photograph and without a doubt you must go to the far end of the Reflecting Pool.

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  • etfromnc's Profile Photo

    The tallest building in the District of Columbia

    by etfromnc Written Mar 11, 2012
    Currently closed for repairs

    By law. Congress has passed a law that no building in DC can be taller than the 555 foot high Washington Monument, which was named for our first president, not the city in which it is located. A stone obelisk the Washington Monument was dedicated on 21 February 1855 about two months after this remarkable 36 year construction project was completed. The 90,000-ton stone structure was designed by Robert Mills and cost $1,187,710. Unfortunately, like much of public Washington, it seems that there are almost always major repairs or renovations underway. For example, David Rubinstein, co-founder of the Carlyle Group, a private equity firm, has recently donated $7.5 million to match a Congressional appropriation to renovate the $1.2 million building which has been closed since a magnitude 5.8 earthquake centered near Richmond last August. When open, the Monument will receive from 1500 to 2000 visitors per day.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT

    by DennyP Written Sep 21, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    MY FAVOURITE PHOTO OF THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT
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    Located at the western end of the National mall stands the Washington Monument ..very impressive and standing over 555 ft high this beautiful monument was a dedication to George Washington for his unfailing leadership during the American Revolution..This huge white marble obelisk is both the worlds highest Obelisk and also the tallest stone structure..it was decided that a monument be built in the district and construction began after a cornerstone was laid in 1848 The monument was constructed in two periods of years being 1848 to 1856 and then 1876 to 1884 These delays in construction were mainly due to lack of funds and of course the American Civil War..They say the the difference in the colour of the marble at the 150 ft mark was due to the civil war. The United States Army Corps of Engineers finally completed the constructionand the monument was dedicated on the February 21st 1885 and was not officially opened to the public until October of 1888..
    There was a major restoration programme to repair the ailing Monument in 1996 and the restoration was not completed till the year 2000.. This is a most attractive monument and my favourite in DC,,
    tickets are available for entry into the monument on a first come basis and can be obtained at the Washington Monument Building on 15th St. at 8.30 am the tickets are free..the number to call is 1-877-559-6777..

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  • Gillybob's Profile Photo

    Views aplenty!

    by Gillybob Written May 8, 2011
    From Capitol Hill
    1 more image

    This monument is one of the most prominent in Washington DC. Built in honour of George Washington, first President, it was finished in December 1884.

    The Monument is shaped like an obelisk and stands 555’ 5 1/8” tall. There is a viewing area at the top which offers views over thirty miles.

    The monument is open from 09:00 to 16:45 and is admission free, although tickets must be obtained in advanced (details on website below).

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument

    by Tom_Fields Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Washington Monument
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    This is the best place to actually see the city. If your time is as limited as mine was, do this.

    If you go, notice the change in color partway up the structure. During the Civil War, construction was halted. Afterward, it resumed. But the quarry no longer had rock of the same exact shade; a lighter one had to be used.

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  • soccergrrl's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument

    by soccergrrl Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You see my point

    aka "The Big Pencil." The windows are small, but the view from the top is unrivaled, as this is as tall as it gets in DC. Visit the website below for details on tix (they are required but are free for same-day visits; if you reserve ahead of time there is a service charge) and hours.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Washington monument

    by mindcrime Updated Nov 9, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Washington monument
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    We walked to Washington monument, first we took some pictures from distance and then we went to the Monument Lodge where we got the free tickets for 10.00am. There was supposed to be a huge line but we were up at 10:30. Before that we had the chance to take some more pictures of the surrounded area and take a close look at the stones of the monument. Pic 3 shows clearly different colors because the construction took 36 years to be completed so different stones were used.

    The monument was completed at the end of 1884 in honor of George Washington(1732-1799, the first president of United States) and it is actually a large obelisk (555 feet high) made of sandstone, granite and marble surrounded by American flags (pics 1-2)

    When we finally got inside, we passed through screening, had to wait for 10’ and went up with the elevator. The view was great of course, on a clear day you can see far in the distance (in excess of 45 km) but we were interested to see The Mall and the memorials anyway. Pic 4 shows one of the many great view you have from up there. We started to check every window and checking the panel where they have information of what we were looking at.

    The monument is open daily 9.00-22.00(till 17.00 september-may), no admission but tickets required, there’s no storage facility and you cant bring inside large backpacks, strollers, food or drink.

    Pic 5 shows the Washington monument during the night as seen from Lincoln memorial, isn’t the reflection on the lake amazing?

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Washington Monument

    by cjg1 Updated Jun 18, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The Washington Monument is a large Obelisk that dominates the DC area; it is the largest structure after all. Completed in 1885 the structure is made of marble, sandstone and granite. Notice the two toned color as a result of stopped construction and different shades of marble; the color difference is definitely noticable even from a long distance.

    The Monument of course is in honor of the First President; George Washington and was dedicated on his birthday (February 22) in 1885. The monument is surrounded by a series of American flags.

    My wife says that many politicians must have "Monument Envy"; a nod to the structures phallic appearance. Even Marge Simpson remarked on it in the Simpsons.

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  • moiraistyx's Profile Photo

    THE TALLEST MONUMENT IN DC-I THINK

    by moiraistyx Updated Jun 16, 2010

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    Washington Monument
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    Who can miss this piece of history when they come visit DC. Just about everywhere you walk in the North West and South West sections of the city give you a view of this monument. The monument stands at an impressive 555 feet, 5 1/8 inches, there are 50 floors from the lobby to the observation level. At it's widest the monument is 55 feet 1 1/2 inches and 34 feet 5 1/2 inches at the top. The wall are 15 feet thick at the base and 18 inches thick at the observation level. The monument weighs a whopping 90,854 tons and is made from 36,491blocks of white marble and granite. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848 and the capstone set on December 6, 1884. The monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885, but didn't open to the public until October 9, 1888. The Washington monument was designed by Robert Mills and cost a total of $1,187,710 to be built. As it is obvious who this monument is dedicated to, I didn't think I needed to put it in here.

    This past spring I was in Alexandria to finish up my Masters residency. On our last night some classmates and I were able to take an evening tour of some of the places to see. I have to say, DC is much prettier at night than I thought it could be.

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