Olympic National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • not just any logs, elk
    not just any logs, elk
    by richiecdisc
  • a big male walks up toward Glacier Meadow
    a big male walks up toward Glacier...
    by richiecdisc
  • D using a driftwood bridge
    D using a driftwood bridge
    by richiecdisc

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Olympic National Park

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

    by mtncorg Updated Nov 25, 2003

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    WWI monument in front of BC Parliment, Victoria

    Oh Canada. Just across the waters from the Park is another country. See it in a day or tarry longer in the faux British atmosphere of Victoria. If you listen closely, you will notice that they all speak a bit funny up here. Victoria has plenty to keep you occupied and the best way to first see it is from the Inner Harbor, which you can only get to via floatplane from Vancouver or ferry from either Seattle - Princess Margaurite - or the Coho from Port Angeles. There many fine pages covering Victoria. I will refer you to those of rmdw and ann75.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MT WASHINGTON

    by mtncorg Written Nov 25, 2003

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    Mt Washington, late summer from Mt Ellinor

    Among the same ridge as Mt Ellinor is Mt Washington - so named because of the mountain's profile is supposed to have the appearance of the Nation's first President when viewed from the Puget lowlands below. At 6255 feet/1896 meters, Mt Washington is much taller than Mt Ellinor and represents a step above in climbing difficulty, as well. You will grab many more bushes on the way up this one. To avoid snow, you need to go a little later - mid-July, though with the knowledge of an ice axe and crampons, going early can be safer with hard snows to face in one crux part which become very loose scree later. For the loose scree, I recommend collapsible ski poles. The views are better here than Ellinor, but not by a lot. Do this peak to improve your skill. If it is just views you seek, Ellinor is fine.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MT ELLINOR

    by mtncorg Written Nov 25, 2003

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    Mt Ellinor rises to the south off Mt Washington

    Mt Ellinor - 5944 feet/1812 meters - is a climb and it is actually just outside of the southeast corner of the Park. But it is an easy climb - a bush here and a rock there to grab - and your most dramatic views are over much of the southern and eastern sections of the Park. This climb is best done after late June to avoid snows - unless you are comfortable with an ice axe and crampons, in which case go before for the grand glissade you get on descent. Your view is grander than Hurricane Ridge, since it is a 360 view. You have literal seas of peaks to the north and northwest. Far away, you can glimpse the icy oceans of Olympus. To the south and east, the huge glacially-created Puget Trough. Ancient glacial sheets separated the Olympics from the Cascades to the east. After the Ice Ages ended and the glaciers had withdrawn, the ocean invaded the lowest areas forming what is the Puget Sound and the Hood Canal. It is all visible from up here. As are the skyscrapers of Seattle - not so tall from here, but glinting sometimes in the sun - and the smokestack of Tacoma - the 'aroma of Tacoma'. Mt Rainier looms, dwarfing everything in the far southeast distance.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Camille_W's Profile Photo

    Sleep a few yards from the waves!

    by Camille_W Written Apr 15, 2003

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    Salt Creek Park, just outside of Port Angeles, is a quiet little campground and picnic area that is far enough off the beaten path that the crowds never find it. If you are camping, look for sites along the forest loop, especially those along the edge of the low bluff. These camp sites are only a few yards above the waves.

    It think the beach is one of the most picturesque in Washington. The point shelters a small bay with grassy meadows that lead to the base of tall tree-covered peaks. There is a small island in the bay that you can walk to during low tide - but you better be a good swimmer or patient if you linger too long!

    You can find Salt Creek by taking route 112 thirteen miles west from Port Angeles. Turn right on Camp Hayden Road and follow it three miles to the park.

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  • Ken_Weaver's Profile Photo

    Banana Slugs!

    by Ken_Weaver Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Banana Slug

    Grab your hotel provided walking stick and go for a walk in the woods and find that largest banana slugs in the North America!. Best time of year is May, June, or October. They range in size up to eight inches long! The slug has two sets of antennae- long ones are for seeing and the short ones are for smelling. The slugs leave a mucus slime trail as they move. You can find them on trees, branches and under logs.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Ken_Weaver's Profile Photo

    Banana Slugs are a West Coast Creature

    by Ken_Weaver Written Feb 25, 2003

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    West Coast of U.S.

    The Banana Slug(ariolimax columbianus) lives in the moist forests on the west coast of the United States. It feeds only between the temperatures of 10-16C(50-60F) and eats in 48 hour cycles- Eats for 24 hours, the fasts for 24 hours. Typically eats fallen leaves, lichen and mosses or other organic decaying materials on the forest floor.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • Ken_Weaver's Profile Photo

    Don't Kill them with Salt!

    by Ken_Weaver Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Slug on a Mushroom

    Banana Slugs are scavengers of the forest. The typically eat only decaying organic matter and turn it in to a more usable waste for the forest floor. The practice of putting salt on the slug is "cruel and unusual!" When this happens the fluids in the slug flow to the outer mucus covering of the creature and it just dies of dehydrate as it tries to neutralize the salt. If the slug is in the way, simply scoot it off to the side and it will find a place in indirect light.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • lucythedog's Profile Photo

    RUBY BEACH

    by lucythedog Written Nov 6, 2003

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    LOVE THIS BEACH!!

    Ruby Beach was a nice excursion and a nice little extra piece of Oly Nat'l Park.. i got off the leash(not supposed to...oh well) played in the surf and my favorite..got to be a DOG ON A LOG!!!

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Travel with Pets
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Ken_Weaver's Profile Photo

    Other than Yellow

    by Ken_Weaver Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Spotted Banana Slug

    Most banana slugs are bright yellow as expected for something named after a banana! However, some varieties are white, some black and even some spotted like the one in this picture.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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Olympic National Park Off The Beaten Path

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