Oysterville Travel Guide

  • Oysterville
    by Segolily
  • Oysterville
    by Segolily
  • Things to Do
    by Segolily

Oysterville Things to Do

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    by Segolily Written Dec 27, 2008

    These oyster middens were fairly common. I don't know if they minded me picking out a shell or two, but we couldn't get over how many there were. And yes it smelled.

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    by Segolily Written Dec 27, 2008

    You may not be able to take a tour of the farms, or pick your own oysters, but you can get fresh seafood (including local oysters) and buy local products. I loved the little store and went back a couple times for things I decided I needed. One day I was there everyone was out moving oysters and things in the store were a little hectic.

    "The Cannery - 1940
    The Northern Oyster Company, begun in the 1930s by Ted Holway, Glenn Heckes, and Roy Kemmer, operated as a cannery until 1967. Now it is the home of Oysterville Sea Farms, selling fresh oysters and other local products. Though no longer a cannery, it is the only structure remaining in Oysterville that gives testimony to the settlement's original reason for being."

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    • Historical Travel

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    by Segolily Written Dec 27, 2008

    I didn't take a picture of every home. In fact it looks like I only ended up with one representative. I'm sorry about that. They were each so unique. Out front each had a short history of the home, who had built it, who had lived there, what they did in the community.
    There are 40 stops on the Oysterville historic tour. Most of them are homes. The unusual thing about this is that it is nearly every single home in the town. The whole town is a historic area, very little changed from the turn of the 19th century.

    "R. H. Espy House - 1871
    Robert Hamilton Espy, co-founder of Oysterville, built this house in 1871, shortly after he married. From 1854 until that time he had lived in a log cabin about 100 feet south and across the road. The "Red House" has remained in the Espy family for six generations."

    Robert Espy Home 1871
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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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