Point Pleasant Things to Do

  • Walter Newman Mansion House aka Tavern at park
    Walter Newman Mansion House aka Tavern...
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  • view of the
    view of the "point between two waters"
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  • marker sits in front of mansion house on Ohio Riv
    marker sits in front of mansion house on...
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in Point Pleasant

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    Shawnee Indian Altar Stone

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005
    photo of the altar stone at the park

    This alter stone is believed to be used by the "Water Panther Clan" which was the clan of Chief Cornstalk. It was located in near by Leon, WV on 10-mile Creek.

    there is sign giving more information about the stone altar.

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    French Leaden Plate Marker at the park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    marker sits in front of mansion house on Ohio Riv

    THE Treaty of Aiz-la-Chapelle of 1748, like its predecessors, at Ryswick and Utrecht fafled to settle the vital question between the rival claimants of North America. A commission of two Englishmen and two Frenchmen sat in Paris for many months after this treaty was signed, endeavoring to adjust the French-English boundaries in America; but they labored in vain.

    The first subject in dispute was the bounds of Acadia. The Treaty of Utrecht ceded it to England without defining its bounds, and thus planted the seeds of future quarrels. The French now contended that Acadia comprised only the peninsula of Nova Scotia, while the English claimed that the bounds formerly given to it by the French must now be adhered to. By these bounds the vast territory comprising northern Maine, New Brunswick, and a great portion of the St. Lawrence Valley were included in Acadia. While this question was pending, a more important and immediate one came up for solution, namely, the ownership of the Ohio Valley
    The claims of both nations were extravagant in the extreme. If the French had had their way, the English would have been confined to the narrow space between the crest of the Alleghanies and the Atlantic. If the English boundaries had been accepted, the French would have been hemmed within a small portion of Canada, north of the river St. Lawrence. Both nations were now moving to occupy the Ohio Valley. The governor of Canada sent Celoron de Bienville, who, with a company of Canadians and Indians, floated down the Allegheny and Ohio rivers, and took formal possession in the name of his king. At the mouth of a river flowing into the Ohio, he would choose a large tree and nail to it a tin plate bearing the arms of France, while at its root he would bury a leaden plate inscribed with the statement that the country belonged to France. This was done at many places along the Ohio

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    Memorial to the frontiersmen

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    Closeup of the Frontiersman statue at memorial

    Here at the confluence of the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers, the bloody, day long battle of Point Pleasant was fought. On 10-10-1774, Col Andrew Lewis and 1,100 va militiamen decisively defeated a like number of indians led by the Shawnee Chieftan Cornstalk.
    Considered a landmark in frontier history, some consider the battle to be the first of the American Revolution.

    Fought on this point known by the Wyandotte indians "tu-endie-wei" which means "the point between two waters"..the battle raged all day. At the end 230 indians were killed or wounded and more than 50 frontiers men had lost their lives, including Col. Charles Lewis brother of Col. Andrew Lewis.

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    Where the Kanawha River meets the Ohio River

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    view of the

    This is just a beautiful scene from the Point of the Park..The Kanawha River which flows into Charleston (the capital) ends/flows into the Ohio River at this point..

    very pretty and there are picnic tables located near this scene also.

    Tu-Endie-Wei is the Wyandotte Indian phrase that means.."the point between two waters".

    The battle raged here all day. At times Cornstalk and this braves held the upper hand ,but eventually the firepower of the backwoodsmen proved superior on the heavily forested battlefield.

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    More on Chief Cornstalk

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    Chief Cornstalks tomb near Ohio River

    Cornstalk abided by this treaty for the remainder of his life. Most Shawnees did not. By 1777, the Shawnee Indians again planned to drive the white settlers from the region. This time they did so at the urging of British soldiers who sought assistance in defeating their colonists in the American Revolution. Cornstalk and his son, Elinipsico, went to Point Pleasant, the site of an American fort, to warn the whites of the impending attack. The Americans took the natives hostage. Shortly thereafter, news reached Point Pleasant that, presumably, the Shawnee had ambushed and killed an American soldier. Seeking vengeance, the colonists massacred Cornstalk, his son, and other natives in American custody.
    Cornstalk illustrates the division of the Native Americans in the Ohio Country. Even within the same tribe, members could not agree on how to deal with white settlers moving into the area. Also, he shows how weak the natives truly were. As thousands of more English colonists and then Americans moved into the Ohio Country, it would be only a matter of time until the natives lost their land.
    Almost two centuries before the shadow of the Mothman reared its head in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, the land around the Ohio River ran red with blood. As the inhabitants of the American colonies began to push their way to the west, and later fought for their independence from Britain, they entered into deadly combat with the Native American inhabitants of the land. Perhaps their greatest foe in these early Indian wars was Chief Cornstalk, who later became a friend to the Americans. But treachery, deception and murder would bring an end to the chief’s life and a curse that he placed on Point Pleasant would linger for 200 years, bringing tragedy, death and disaster....

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    Shawnee Indian Chief Cornstalk Tombstone at Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    Chief Cornstalks Tombstone

    Cornstalk was a chief of the Shawnee Indians. He was born circa 1720. His Indian name was Keigh-tugh-qua. Little is known about his early years. In all likelihood, he was born in Pennsylvania, the home of the Shawnee in the 1720s, and then moved to Ohio around 1730 with the bulk of the Shawnee tribe.
    During the French and Indian War, Cornstalk and the Shawnee sided with the French. They feared that English settlers would flood the Ohio Country if the whites were not stopped. Cornstalk led raiding parties into western Virginia, hoping to drive the English away from Shawnee territory. He also played an active part in Pontiac's Rebellion in 1763. Colonel Henry Bouquet defeated the Shawnee in 1764. To assure that the natives would sign a peace treaty ending the rebellion, Bouquet seized several hostages, including Cornstalk. The Shawnee agreed not to take up arms against the English again. During the next decade, fighting did occur between the English and the Ohio natives. Cornstalk tried to ease the tensions, but the influx of more white settlers placed him in the minority of how to deal with the whites. By the spring of 1774, violence was constant. On May 3, 1774, a group of English colonists, seeking vengeance, killed eleven Mingo Indians. At least two of them were relatives of Chief Logan, leader of the Mingos at Yellow Creek.

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    Mad Anne Bailey Gravestone

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    Anne Bailey Tombstone on the park grounds

    In the late 1700s Anne Bailey served in the Great Kanawha Valley as a buckskin-clad frontierswoman who could handle a horse, hatchet, and long rifle as well as any man. When her husband was killed in the battle of Point Pleasant in 1774 she was compelled to avenge his death and embarked on a new life as border scout and messenger. The 1861 poem “Anne Bailey’s Ride” commemorates her heroic 1791 ride alone through over 100 miles of mostly wilderness when Fort Lee (Charleston) was threatened with attack to Fort Savannah (Lewisburg) and her return with desperately needed gunpowder.
    The story of Anne Bailey's life is interwoven with local folklore, but her place as a pioneer heroine is unquestioned. In 1791 what is today West Virginia was largely unsettled wilderness in the middle of a frontier war between would-be settlers and local Indian tribes. When Fort Lee was threatened with attack and a low supply of ammunition, Anne Bailey, scout and messenger, rode alone through 100 miles of near wilderness to Fort Savannah at Lewisburg and returned with the needed powder to save the fort at Clendenin's Settlement which today is Charleston, West Virginia.
    Born Anne Hennis in Liverpool, England, probably in 1742, she came to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia when she was about 19 and in 1765 married Richard Trotter, a local settler. When Lord Dunmore called for militia to fight the Indians of the western border in 1774, Richard Trotter enlisted, but was killed on Oct. 10, 1774 at the Battle of Point Pleasant against the forces of Shawnee leader, Cornstalk. This event changed Anne's life completely and she left her son, William Trotter, to the care of others and became a skilled frontier scout, horsewoman, hunter, messenger and storyteller, wearing buckskins, carrying hatchet, knife and long rifle. She married again in 1785 to John Bailey, another frontiersman and army ranger, those forerunners of today's special forces.

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    Visit Mansion House Museum at Tu-Endie-Wei park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005

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    Walter Newman Mansion House aka Tavern at park

    Located on the park is Mansion House. Erected in 1796 by Walter Newman as a tavern, it is the oldest, hewn log house in the Kanawha Valley. Preserved as a museum, it features displays of antiques and heirlooms of the era, including a large square piano believed to be one of the first brought over the Alleghenies. Two bedrooms are furnished with authentic four-poster beds that are more than 150 years old.

    You can take pictures inside and outside the mansion house. Tour guides let you look at your leisure and glad to answer any questions. There are four floors including the basement and attic..Steps very narrow so be careful.
    The museum is open from May through October. There is no cost, they accept donations. Hours Mon-Sat 10am to 430pm and Sun 1pm to 430pm open holidays.

    see the extra pictures taken inside the house.

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    Tu-Endie-Wei State Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005
    Monument to the Frontiersmen who died here

    Located in the southern end of the town of Point Pleasant (#1 Main Street), this four-acre State Park commemorates the 1774 engagement. The park's centerpiece is the 84-foot granite obelisk that honors the Virginia Militiamen who gave their lives during the battle, while the statue of a frontiersman stands at the base.

    Tu-Endie-Wei State Park is open year round.
    Nearby attractions: WV State Farm Museum, Fort Randolph, Blennerhassett Island Historic State Park, Bob Evans Farm in ohio and the River Museum of Point Pleasant.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Historic Marker of Col Andrew and Charles Lewis

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Aug 6, 2005
    historic marker of the Lewis brothers

    There is a historic marker of Col. Andrew and his brother Col Charles Lewis march.
    This marker is located at Krodel park off Rt. 2

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Point Pleasant Things to Do

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