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Most Viewed Favorites in Wyoming

  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Guaranteed Elk sightings and bugling

    by Homanded Written Jan 13, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lupine Meadows trailhead road.

    Ask the ranger at the booth and set your watches.
    Best in early evenings or pre-dawn. Especially in the fall, large male elk will gather here and bugle and fight for their harems.

    Other than Mammoth (in Yellowstone), this is the one place where I've seen the most elk gathered in numbers.

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Almost GURANTEED bear sightings

    by Homanded Written Jan 13, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Road to Teton Village - best if you do this drive early morning before 11:00am. Most mornings you will find bears along the road side, especially in the fall, fattening up on berries and various grasses/fruits.
    Great place to also spot mothers with cubs.

    This place has never failed me and I have seen many bears there. No need to chase them down on foot, most will eventually continue feeding, carrying on within easy sight of your car window.

    DO NOT APPROACH BEARS, ESPECIALLY MOTHERS WITH CUBS!!!

    Inquisitive bear Typical bear traffic jam, people photographing Mother bear and cubs Black bear Young male bear in a tree

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Almost GUARANTEED Moose sighting

    by Homanded Written Jan 13, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you're going to see moose in and around Grand Teton, this is a place that has never failed.
    Early mornings, late afternoons/evenings are best but can usually be found all day long.

    #1) Gros Ventre Campground and surrounding vicinity. Also, in my opinion, one of the best campgrounds in the area.
    Ask the local watchman if/when/where moose were last seen.
    Scoping the river and surrounding willows can usually get you great results.

    #2) Moose Junction, just opposite of Dornan's Campground on river's edge. Willows usually have moose feeding in area.

    #3) Road to Teton Village - moose gather all along the waterways on the road to Teton Village.
    Also watch for deer and bear - plentiful.

    Gros Ventre Campground - bull in mid afternoon Bull in velvet - Moose Junction Gros Ventre River - on way to campground Cow and Calf on road to Teton Village Gros Ventre Campground - young bull

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    the great race

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 18, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Though Yellowstone is a special place, Grand Teton National Park is most special to me. It is an incredible range and the park offers perhaps the best backpacking of any US national park.

    Fondest memory: In 1994 on my first trip to Wyoming:

    We woke up early to move camp from Yellowstone to the Tetons as we knew there was a small but great campground there called Jenny Lake that was said to fill up early. The ride over was too amazing to not stop for some photos and it became apparent that another couple had the same thing on their minds. We leap-frogged our way with stops to the next campground and both were lucky to get spots, or so we thought. After setting up, we learned a lot of people had left early due to a black bear wrecking havoc in the campground. Quite a few tents were torn into and though no one was hurt, it made for a less than relaxing camping experience. We had a full day after setting up including a hike and a trip to a brewery so I figured nothing could keep me from sleeping . . . except for the commotion that ensued that night! People yelling, talking, bear trap being set off a few times without success until they did finally catch the critter.

    early morning Teton range
    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Directions To Yellowstone

    by Yaqui Written Jul 18, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: North Entrance - Near the gateway community of Gardiner, MT, the North Entrance is the only park entrance open to wheeled vehicles all year. November through April, the North Entrance provides the only access to Cooke City, MT. US Highway 212 east of Cooke City is closed to wheeled vehicles November through April. The road from Mammoth to Norris is open to wheeled vehicles from the third Friday in April through the first Sunday in November, and to tracked oversnow vehicles usually from the third Monday in December to the Monday of the first full week in March. Closest airline service is Bozeman, MT. See the Operating Hours and Seasons for more information. Services are available year around.

    West Entrance - Adjacent to the town of West Yellowstone, MT, the West Entrance is open to wheeled vehicles from the third Friday in April through the first Sunday in November, and to tracked oversnow vehicles from the third Monday in December o the Monday of the second full week in March. Closest airline service is West Yellowstone, MT, Bozeman, MT, Idaho Falls, ID, and Salt Lake City, UT. See the Operating Hours and Seasons for more information. Services are available year around.

    South & East Entrances - Open to wheeled vehicles from the second Friday of May through the first Sunday in November, and to tracked oversnow vehicles from the third Monday in December to the Monday of the second full week in March. Limited services are available near the South and East Entrances. Closest airline service to the South Entrance is Jackson, WY and Cody, WY to the East Entrance. See our Road Construction Page for information about possible delays.

    Northeast Entrance - Near the gateway communities of Silver Gate and Cooke City, MT, this entrance is open year around for wheeled vehicle access to Cooke City through Gardiner, MT and the North Entrance. Opening dates for roads east of Cooke City vary from year to year, depending on the weather. The Beartooth Highway is open from late May/early June (weather dependent) to mid October. Storms occasionally temporarily close the Beartooth Highway during this "open" period. See the Operating Hours and Seasons and Road Construction Schedule for more information. Closest airline service is Billings, MT. Services are available year around.http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/directions.htm

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Wyoming State Flag

    by Astrobuck Written Apr 14, 2007

    Fondest memory: The Wyoming state flag has a bison on a blue field bordered in white and red, with the state seal on the bison. The woman on the seal represents the state motto "Equal Rights" and the two men represent cattle ranchers and miners. The words "Livestock", "Mines", "Grains" and "Oil" represent Wyoming's wealth. The dates 1869 and 1890 tell when Wyoming organized as a territory of the United States and when it became a state.

    Pretty cool flag. I like it.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Planning your trip - useful websites

    by toonsarah Updated Jan 14, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There are several websites that I found helpful when planning our trip to Wyoming. Some of the best were:

    http://www.wyomingtourism.org/
    This is the official tourism website for the state. It’s a bit clunky in places but packed with useful info and well-supplied with external links. I found many of the best accommodations here – the info about them on this site might be limited but there are links to the motel or B&B’s own website if you want to investigate further. You can also order a useful trip planning pack which includes a reasonable road map.

    http://www.ultimatewyoming.com/
    This is another useful general website for holiday planning, though more commercial in its approach.

    http://www.byways.org/browse/states/WY/
    We enjoyed getting off the main roads and exploring the scenic byways in Wyoming – this website helped us identify the highlights on each route and plan where to stop for a walk or a picnic lunch.

    http://www.bedandbreakfast.com/wyoming.html
    If like us you enjoy staying in B&Bs you’ll find this website very helpful. We discovered the excellent Spahn’s Bighorn B&B through this route.

    http://www.nps.gov/state/WY/
    One of the highlights of any visit to Wyoming has to be the National Parks (Yellowstone and Grand Teton), so the National Park Service website is a must. And don’t forget the Devils Tower National Monument, the lesser known Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area and the various historic sites.

    Flags over Wyoming
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    For history buffs

    by toonsarah Updated Oct 7, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of the aspects of Wyoming that I particularly enjoyed were the numerous historical sites associated with the Oregon Trail and other pioneer routes, and with the legends of the wild west.

    Check out Register Rock and the Oregon Trail Wagon Ruts near Guernsey and Fort Laramie for the former. For western "heros" go to Old Trail Town in Cody to see the Hole in the Wall Cabin, or to Laramie's Wyoming Territorial Prison to see where Butch Cassidy was once incarcerated, or to Sundance to learn how the Kid got his name.

    Memorial plaque at Register Rock
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    National Parks

    by toonsarah Updated Oct 3, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It's stating the obvious, but one of the main highlights of any trip to Wyoming has to be a visit to the two great National Parks. And I do mean two - everyone seems to know about and visit Yellowstone, but you really shouldn't omit Grand Teton from your itinerary. They're both very different, although close neighbours.

    We spent 3 days in Yellowstone, which I would say was about right for us (but allow more if you want to see absolutely everything, or intend to do some of the longer hikes). We only allowed 1 day for Grand Teton, based on advice given us by a friend who'd visited previously (not a VT-er!), and this wasn't really enough.

    Fondest memory: Go to Yellowstone for the geysers and other geological phenomena, the spectacular canyon and the wild animals, especially bison. For me the great attraction of Grand Teton is the mountain scenery, and also the (relative) lack of crowds.

    For lots of tips to help you plan, check out the National Parks websites:

    www.nps.gov/yell/ for Yellowstone
    www.nps.gov/grte/ for Grand Teton

    Grand Teton view
    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Wyoming: The Equality State

    by Astrobuck Written Jun 13, 2006

    Favorite thing: Wyoming is nicknamed "The Equality State" because it was the first state to grant women the right to vote in 1869. This action lead to the nickname "The Suffrage State" and later to "The Equality State." "Equality" is also the state motto.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Women's Travel

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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Bucking Horse and Rider

    by Astrobuck Updated Jun 13, 2006

    Fondest memory: When you travel to Wyoming, you will see many signs, statues, and other types of things containing the bucking horse and rider. The bucking horse and rider has become so popular in Wyoming that the State and the University of Wyoming joined efforts to protect the symbol by trademarking it.

    The picture you see here is a statue of the bucking horse and rider at the state capitol building in Cheyenne. The second photo is the bucking horse and rider symbol you see all over the state.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    Cheyenne

    by sswagner Written Jan 22, 2005

    Favorite thing: This small city is the capital of Wyoming. It sits on the dusty high plains in the southeast part of the state not far from Colorado. The city is known for its "Frontier Days" festival in the summertime. In the center of Cheyenne is its gold domed state capitol building. Cheyenne is approximately 100 miles north of Denver, CO. Because it is at the junction of two interstate highways, it is often a logical stop for an interstate road trip.

    Fondest memory: Very scenic in the wintertime, which is when I visited.

    Wyoming State Capitol
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • KaiM's Profile Photo

    Endless Roads and Wide Open Space

    by KaiM Updated Jul 12, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Driving on an endless highway across the Plains. The mountain tops covered with snow at the horizon. A deer running across the road. And the radio plays some country music... That's the modern Wild West. That's Wyoming. I hated country music before I got there, now I like it. My tip for a road trip: Check the weather forecast and road conditions. Even when you start with sunny skies, weather might change fast. Especially during wintertime. Beware of blizzards. For road conditions check: http://www.wyoroad.info/

    Open lands in Wyoming
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Study Abroad
    • Road Trip

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Visit mighty beautiful Yellowstone National Park

    by Roeffie Updated Feb 24, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Yellowstone National Park

    About 17 million years ago, a lot of boiling hot melted rocks and gasses of deep inside the earth came to the surface.
    A lot of volcanic eruptions occured. The result we see today is Yellowstone National Park.
    600,000 years ago the Yellowstone caldera was formed, when volcanic activity made a piece of land collaps of more than 45 by 75 km. The combination of magma, snow and water makes the geysers erupt.

    Fondest memory: Link to my Yellowstone N.P. Travelogue

    Saw Mill Geyser

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  • KaiM's Profile Photo

    Railroad tracks and new towns

    by KaiM Written Jan 16, 2004

    Favorite thing: Moving towns. Dozens of tents. Loud railroad workers. Dangerous bandits. All of that is part of Wyoming's wild past that can not be divided from the history of the Union Pacific Railroad.

    The railroad company constructed the tracks that lead all the way from the Nebraska state border through south Wyoming and left the state continuing through Utah. Along the railroad constructions so-called "Hell on Wheels"-towns came to existence. Those where towns of tents where the railroad workers lived. Tough guys who used their fists quite often.

    When the railroad workers moved further west in 1868, some of the tent towns became real communities and developed to cities with real buildings. Some of those towns are Cheyenne, Laramie, Rawlins, Green River and Evanston. Those major railroad towns provided shipping and supply services for surrounding ranches and industries. New communities sprang up all along the railroad.

    The booming railroad communities also attracted outlaws like Sundance Kid and others. Bank and train robbery became a big business.

    Today you can still see remains of the past in most of the cities mentioned above. Old stations, parts of historic railroad tracks and the new railroad connections.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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