Grand Teton National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • no, not a horse but a cow, er,  a female moose
    no, not a horse but a cow, er, a female...
    by richiecdisc
  • one of the Teton's prettiest views
    one of the Teton's prettiest views
    by richiecdisc
  • Schwabacher was worth the effort
    Schwabacher was worth the effort
    by richiecdisc

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Grand Teton National Park

  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    Dornams, In the Park, But Not Part of the Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Jan 8, 2011
    Dornans Adventure Sports Shop
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    Dornans is a fifth generation, privately run resort that has been in business for over 60 years. This resort is located in the Moose area, within the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park. In Dornan you will find cabins, two restaurants, a sports shop, a business for boat and bike rentals, a fly shop for fisherman, a small grocery, gas station, and an ATM. Dornans also offers float trips on the Snake River, and the Fly shop offers fly fishing lessons, and guided fishing trips. If you visit in the winter, you may rent snowshoes, and cross country skis, although some of the shops do close during the winter months. If you are exploring the southern end of Grand Teton and need an ATM, gas, food, drinks, snacks, or maybe you would like to pick up a bottle of wine, Dornans can fill your needs.

    If you are interested in staying in their cabins, check the webpage below for information, photos, and reservations.

    My third photo shows the inside of the Moosley Seconds Shop, my fourth is of the Snake River Angler Fly Shop, and my last is of Spur Ranch Cabins.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Water Sports
    • Cycling

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    A Wilderness Break, Jackson, WY

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Dec 30, 2010

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    Elk Antler Arch in Jackson���s Town Square

    If you are staying in the national park, and would like to take a break in town, the tourist town of Jackson, Wyomng lies near the southern end of Grand Teton National Park. Because of its location, Jackson’s economy depends on tourism, both in the summer and winter months. The historic Town Square is the center of the downtown area. The town offers restaurants, shopping, hotels, and entertainment in a western atmosphere. Stores offer a wide range of items, ranging from souvenirs, gifts, outdoor gear, to trendy boutiques. In the summer the J.H. Rodeo operates. If you are interested in this rodeo, call 307-733-2805 or visit their web page at http://www.jhrodeo.com

    While in Jackson dress casual; or casual dressy, if you intend to eat out in one of the more upscale restaurants.

    For additional information on Jackson, visit my Jackson, Wyoming, a Town in Jackson Hole
    pages.

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  • KimberlyAnn's Profile Photo

    National Museum of Wildlife Art

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Dec 9, 2010

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    The museum is built using Arizona sandstone.

    If you love wildlife and art, and you have the time, the National Museum of Wildlife Art is a must do activity for you. The museum contains 14 excellent gallery rooms with wildlife paintings and sculptures. Your trip will be enhanced if you use one of the radios that you may carry with you as you explore the museum. Some of the painting and sculpture that you see have a number on them. If you key this number into your radio, you will hear a short, informative talk about the piece that you are viewing. The museum also has a number of films you may choose to watch. We watched a film narrated by Robert Bateman, an excellent wildlife painter. He talked about his paintings, and how he created them. We were especially interested in his demonstration on how he created his large bison painting that hangs in the gallery. There are more than 550 artists who’s works are on display, including Bateman, John Audubon, Albert Bierstadt, George Catlin, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charlie Russell, and Carl Rungius. This is really an excellent collection.

    There is also a small store in the museum, where we purchased a print of a raven, painted by Bateman.

    We went in the morning, and stayed into the afternoon, so we ate in their small restaurant. We were pleasantly surprised. I had homemade broccoli cheese soup, and half of a tuna fish pita sandwich, and it was really good!

    NOTE: No photography is allowed within the museum galleries.

    Address 2820 Rungius Road, Jackson Hole, Wyoming 83001

    Directions The museum is located 2.5 miles from the Town Square in Jackson, on Rungius Road across form the National Elk Refuge, and on the route from Grand Teton National Park to Jackson, Wyoming.

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    pronghorn

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    nice to see our old friends again
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    The pronghorn is often mistaken for an antelope but is in its own family. Though the second fastest mammal in the world after the cheetah, the sure footed and sturdily built speedster actually sustains fast speeds for longer lengths of time. Their horns are particularly interesting with both males and females having the forward “pronged” racks. Males use them fiercely to guard their female harems during the mating season.

    Pronghorns can be seen in the shrubland in the eastern park of Grand Teton National Park. We saw this heard just off Route 191.

    It was great to see pronghorns again. We had seen them a few times in Utah but once out of their range, they of course, disappeared. Seeing them was bittersweet. It sort of meant we were heading back home and the the six-month odyssey was coming to an end.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Avalanche Divide & Canyon

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

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    looking down at Snowdrift lake
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    Avalanche Canyon is one of the most accessible of the unmaintained trails in Grand Teton National Park. Reaching the Avalanche Divide is certainly straightforward enough if you are already hiking up the South Fork of Cascade Canyon on your way to Hurricane Pass. There is a side trail to Avalanche Divide that is very obvious if not thoroughly maintained. Once at the Divide, you will gaze down at Snowdrift Lake backed by impressive Mount Wister at over 11,000 feet. Hiking down from there is considered off-trail and hikers doing so must register at a backcountry ranger station. We hiked to the pass from our backcountry campsite in the Upper South Fork of Cascade Canyon Zone and enjoyed the incredible view. Of course, we couldn't help but want to go down and camp there too. I have since read about a hike up the Avalanche Canyon which is easier to navigate than coming down from where we gazed in wonder. You could go from there to Hurricane Pass for an extended trip or back down Cascade Canyon for a shorter one of about 17 miles. Hmmm, next time.....

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    elk

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

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    I would get better shots in Colorado the next week

    The North American Elk, not to be confused with the European Elk, which is really the North American Moose here. Where is here? Confused yet? Well, I was the first time someone started calling what I call a moose an elk. I don't actually mind a different name, it's just confusing when it's the same name as the one I use for something else. At the end of the day, it's just another big deer, right? Well, not as big a member of the deer family as the moose but still plenty big. And don't start calling them reindeer either, that's caribou here in North America and they are just not the same though they look a lot more like that than a moose, which looks quite a bit like a horse come to think of it, not to confuse you. ;)

    So, the North American Elk is one of the largest members of the deer family and can reach 5 feet at the shoulder and weigh 700 lbs. Males grow antlers each spring and prepare to rut and mate in fall. They drop them in winter to conserve energy as these bony appendages grow up to an inch a day! Man, just imagine if they did not shed them and its implications on the following mating season!

    We were in the Tetons on the brink of the rutting season. Elk were out and about. We went out early every morning searching for them and always found some though it seemed never quite close enough to get a good shot. We also saw them whenever we were returning from Snake River Brewing in Jackson, having to drive quite defensively with these big boys lumbering around. I must have taken 100 photos of them and only kept one. They just weren't that good. A week later, we would be right in the thick of them in Rocky Mountain National Park. Every shot I got there was better than this one and with much less effort too.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    moose

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

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    no, not a horse but a cow, er,  a female moose

    I was a bit disappointed by our 2008 moose sightings in Grand Teton National Park or Yellowstone for that matter. Though not a true stronghold of the North American moose population, I walked right by one on my fist hike in the Grand Tetons in 1994.

    I could be forgiven for high expectations when we ran into a moose no sooner than we entered the park on our recent return trip. No, we didn't literally run into it but we did see a bunch of cars which generally indicates some kind of animal sighting. It was “just” a female, I told my wife, nothing to get excited about. I luckily snapped a photo as that was the last one we saw.

    We have seen quite a few moose in our lives, mostly in Eastern Canada and New England, once running into a huge male with resplendent rack in the act of mating. I saw many in Alaska as well but it seemed I never got close enough for a great shot and I had hoped to do so on this trip. Not to be but I did get this okay shot, even though it was “just” a female.

    Moose are the largest member of the deer family with males reaching up to 7 feet at the shoulder and weighing in at 1500 lbs. The males impressive trademark antlers take up to five months each spring to grow back after they shed them for the winter to conserve energy. They only need them for the mating season to garner the more “horsey” looking female. Though I say that jokingly, moose actually look more like a horse than a deer, especially when no antlers are present. Called elk in Europe, the biggest member of the deer family is mostly found in boreal and mixed deciduous forest in the Northern Hemisphere. In North America, their range is most of Canada, Alaska, New England, and Minnesota with pockets running south into the Rocky Mountains.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Schwabacher Road

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    one of the Teton's prettiest views
    2 more images

    Schwabacher Road is a worthwhile detour for photographers. This small dirt road leads to a great, shallow, reflective part of the Snake River. There are a few short riverside trails that take you a bit deeper in and worth the small effort for even better shots. Get there early in the morning for best light on the Tetons and a more mirror-life river surface too.

    Schwabacher Road is located off Route 191, just north of Moose Junction.

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    • Road Trip
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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    bald eagle

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

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    they love the view from tops of trees
    1 more image

    As the national bird of the United States of America, there are few thrills greater (well, at least for an American) than seeing one of these majestic birds in flight over a national park. Even a relative cynic like myself can't help but hum a little bit of the old “God Bless America” on seeing something like this. It might sounds like a cliché but when you are in the Tetons of all places with the mountains and the prairies and the...ok, ok, there's no oceans white with foam but you get the idea. It's just an amazing moment that I hope everyone gets to experience at least once in their life.

    The bald eagle is however not just a symbol but a real live bird that was on the endangered species list until only recently. These huge birds can have a wing span of up to 100 inches and weigh 13 lbs. Oddly, females are up to 25% larger than their male counterparts and both display the white tale feathers and head that is their hallmark “bald” feature. Their general peak age in the wild is 20 years but one in captivity made it to 50!. As a sea eagle, they prefer to live by water and their range if from Northern Mexico to Alaska. Though birds of prey that prefer fish, the opportunistic feeder will eat whatever is available, often acting the scavenger or thief of other animal's kills. They even frequent garbage dumps, especially where there numbers are greatest such as Alaska.

    They were numbered at close to a half million in the 1700s but were decimated to a mere 400 roosting pairs by the 1950s. Placed on the endangered list in 1967, they rebounded through conservation efforts to over 100,000 by the 1990s and were moved down to “threatened” in 2007. It seems odd since their population is still a mere 20% of its former self.

    We saw a few of them at Oxbow Bend one evening and there were many others marveling over them as is very easy to do.

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    pika

    by richiecdisc Written Dec 14, 2009

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    pikas love hanging on rocks
    1 more image

    If you have never been in an alpine area, you have not likely seen a pika and even if you have been to one, you may not have been so lucky. But if you are a hiker in such area, chances are you have certainly heard one. Their shrill alarms to their comrades of oncoming hikers has earned them the name of the “whistling hare” as they are cousins to rabbits.

    The very small mouse-like creature is lightning quick and a great climber, making them well-adapted to their rocky mountain habitats. They do not hibernate so spend much of their day in search of food and places to store it all for the long winter months. They are a delight to watch and the best way to do it is just sit down, keep an eye out and don't move too much. They scurry as soon as they know you are around.

    We saw a very industrious little pika at Amphitheater Lake. He was constantly on the move and we felt a bit lazy sitting there eating our lunch. Even though we had just hiked nearly 5 miles up 3000 feet, it seemed to pale in comparison to his energy output!

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  • tourguy25's Profile Photo

    Back Road in Grand Teton National Park

    by tourguy25 Written May 22, 2009

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    Hi,

    Thank you for visiting our beautiful part of the U.S. we appreciate your traveling.

    I have driven this road and did indeed have great wild life viewing. See Pics of Moose in a pond on my tip page.

    The road you are looking to drive is from the new visitors center - Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center- located at Moose, Wyoming, follow the signs to the Moose to Wilson road. This road takes you through the property that was just added to the park and was donated by the Rockefeller's. The road is gravel part of the way and is closed to trucks, trailers and RV's.

    The scenery is spectacular and you will see a side of the Grand Teton National Park most people miss. Enjoy your trip!
    Wayne

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    • Family Travel

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  • tourguy25's Profile Photo

    Back Road in Grand Teton National Park

    by tourguy25 Written May 22, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Hi,

    Thank you for visiting our beautiful part of the U.S. we appreciate your traveling.

    I have driven this road and did indeed have great wild life viewing. See Pics of Moose in a pond on my tip page.

    The road you are looking to drive is from the new visitors center - Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center- located at Moose, Wyoming, follow the signs to the Moose to Wilson road. This road takes you through the property that was just added to the park and was donated by the Rockefeller's. The road is gravel part of the way and is closed to trucks, trailers and RV's.

    The scenery is spectacular and you will see a side of the Grand Teton National Park most people miss. Enjoy your trip!
    Wayne

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  • heitzenrater's Profile Photo

    takeing the snake head on

    by heitzenrater Updated Dec 7, 2006
    takeing the snake head on

    Ok so this is a blast. Here is the deal! There are a ton of places to go rafting at. So many i can't even wright about all of them. Here is what you do. Go to the website i listed below. This site contains tons of rafting businesses in and around jackson hole. You will be able to look at all of them and compare prices and trip difficulty.

    IF YOU LIKE MY POST PLEASE GIVE POSITIVE FEEDBACK, THANKS.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Kayaking
    • Rafting

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  • Shihar's Profile Photo

    Fossil Butte National Monument- Kemmerer,WY

    by Shihar Written Oct 29, 2005

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    Unfortunately we did not get a chance to visit this monument, however it was recommended by locals. 50 million years ago this was the site of Fossil Lake. 8198 acres. Visitor center open all year There is also hiking , a picnic area and pretty drive.

    Off US 30, 180 miles south of Grand Teton NP

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    • National/State Park

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    Bridger-Teton National Forest- Jackson WY

    by Shihar Written Oct 29, 2005

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    This National Forest contains 3 wilderness areas within 3.4 million acres. There are 30 campgrounds and a boat ramp. Open all year long. Campgrounds are open spring to fall. Joins Grand Teton NP to the east.

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