Fun things to do in Wyoming

  • Great Fountain Geyser gives us a blast!
    Great Fountain Geyser gives us a blast!
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  • Single Track and Sage
    Single Track and Sage
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  • Elephant Head (also called Cairn Peak)
    Elephant Head (also called Cairn Peak)
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Wyoming

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    Wyoming Frontier Prison

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 30, 2011

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    We had stopped here since it was my things to do while on the way home from South Dakota. We were invited in by some really nice biker folks who were attending some fund raiser that was taking place at the prison. We were able to wonder around for quite some time. We finally felt it was time to set out to find a place to stay for the night. Yet, it was fascinating to see something so historical up close and was able to hear some the tour guides share their knowledge of the prison. Sadley I didn't take any pictures because I never seemed to buy enough film, but I had picked up a brochure.

    The museum is within the Prison, is free, but the tour is not.

    Built to replace the territorial prison in Laramie, Called the “Old Pen” and operated from 1901 to 1981.

    Wyoming Frontier Prison Museum

    HOURS:
    April to October, 8:30 am to 6:30 pm, 7 days a week
    November to March, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Mon - Fri

    ADMISSION:
    Museum is Free

    Guided tours of the prison cost $4.25 for adults
    $3.75 for seniors and children.
    From Memorial Day through Labor Day, tours are offered every hour on the half hour from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 7 days a week.
    Tour schedule is scaled back from Labor Day through Memorial Day. Call for specific times.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Devil's Tower National Monument

    by Basaic Updated Sep 16, 2011

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    Devil's Tower was formed underground as molten magma forced itself into sedimenary rock some 50 million years ago. Over millions of years the sedimentary rock eroded exposing the formation.

    I like the Kiowa explanation better: There were seven sisters and their brother playing in the hills when suddenly the boy starting shaking and running around on all fours. He grew fur and turned into a huge bear. The sisters were frightened and ran but the brother chased them. They climbed a stump which began to rise into the air. The brother, now a bear, tried to get at them and his claws formed the cracks on the side of the formation. The sisters were bourne up to heaven and became the stars of the big dipper.

    Devil's Tower is a very interesting formation. The park offers camping, hiking and lots of local folklore. Devil's Tower is also very popular with rock climbers. I really like this park and feel it is well worth multiple visits.

    For further information see my Devil's Tower Page

    Devil Visitors Center Area View Rock Climber Prairie Dog
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    Bighorn Canyon

    by Basaic Written Sep 16, 2011

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    Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is mostly in Montana; but a part of it juts down into North Central Wyoming. There are a variety of things to do in the southern (Wyoming) part of the park. You can go boating on the lake, fish, hike, visit four area historic ranches or just enjoy the spectacular scenery.

    Also in the same area is the Bighorn National Forest which offers many additional recreational opportunities plus more spectacular scenery.

    Bighorn Canyon (NPS Photo) Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area Bighorn National Forest Bighorn National Forest
    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Fort Bridgers Commanders Quarters

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    One interesting fact is the Commanders quarters, which is a lovely Victorian, was sold and moved off the property during the dark times of abandonment. The individual who bought this huge home, disassembled it and stored it. Do you believe that? So when it came time the historical society looking to buy back the original buildings it was gladley donated back to the park and reassembled at its original site.

    They have tours of this wonderful building now.

    Open year around 8 a.m. to sunset, daily

    Museum
    May 1-Sept. 30: 9 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Daily. Weekends and by appointment when staff is available.

    Oct. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Weekends and by appointment when staff is available.
    Nov. 1 - Apr. 30: Closed

    Related to:
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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    One of the Mecca’s of surveyors, geologists, trekk

    by kokoryko Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Riverton, what a strange idea to go there. . . . I did not visit this small very ordinary city located on the shores of the Wind River, in the middle of the Wind River basin; no, I came there for a special visit: the Brunton compass factory. My intention is not at all to make publicity, just tell about compasses and more specifically about the type of compass I use when I do (should write did, as this did not happen since long time, or only very occasionally) field work**: the GEO. This is a very accurate rugged compass with a clinometer, allowing accurate fast surveying; imagine the guys who tell and write about continental drift, move the continents on the earth surface through time, begin with bearings, inclinations and angles measurements on the field. . . . . Brunton manufactures also a great variety of other compasses, some very light ones for trekking, or some types for sea navigation.
    From what I have seen, they now mainly assemble the components of the compasses, many of which are made in some far east countries, but they are still very strict on quality.
    So, I just wanted to see where my (professional) compass had been built and see how it had been built. I was a bit late in the afternoon there, and most of the workers had gone, but Babara (a lady from the commercial service) took me with her for a short visit and I even could see the offices and labs where a few engineers design the future GEO.
    On the main picture: mud cracks and red color of this shale formation of the Triassic (240 million years) in the Wind River Basin demonstrating dry desert climate at the time there, with my GEO here just for scale purpose on the photograph. Picture 2: at the entrance of the factory, representation of the magnetic declination (angle between magnetic and geographic North) at this very place. It is possible to buy compasses there, many types, and there are even small ones they give free to visitors (or Brunton users).

    A GEO on old rocks Mag and geo north GFeo's waiting to be assembled Workshop Entrance
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  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    Fort Washakie

    by kokoryko Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Fort Washakie is named after the Shoshone chief who made peace with the invaders; in other places he would have been called a “collabo”, but, well, he was the weakest and it is difficult to blame this person, as he did what he thought was the best for his people. Would he have been a “resistant”, his name would probably not be attached to the place, like there are no Sitting Bull, Cochise, Crazy Horse, Geronimo and other resistant Indian chiefs who have places named after them. Fort Washakie is a little settlement, headquarters of the Wind River Indian reservation, located on the former Fort Augur location; if you leave the main road you go into the reservation and need a permit. Located on the road 287 between Lander and Dubois, it is a place where the Indian made a sort of a trading post in the past, and now there is a modern trading post and museum; lots of artifacts can be purchased in the shop, but strange, many of them come from Brazil (rock samples), other display: “made in China”. . . etc. . . Authenticity is a very relative concept; true moccasins, war bonnets (for the ones who like. . . ), beadwork can be purchased; this trading-museum post is worth a stop if you happen to travel on road 287.
    Outside are real tents, decorating the place and there was snow when I visited, giving the place a “wild” atmosphere outside; When I think the Indian were living in that kind of tents during the long winters here, before. . . . .
    The pictures from inside the shop-museum are bad, because it was not allowed to make pictures and an Indian lady kept a close eye on me (why on me? I may not have looked innocent. . . . haha), so I made the pictures “hidden”.
    On the pictures are the old tradin(g) post and the new one; it has become touristy. . . .

    Snowy day, pine tree pillars and Tipee Modern trading post (and museum) Old trading post Trading post Inside the
    Related to:
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  • aphoto4you's Profile Photo

    GRAND TETONS National Park

    by aphoto4you Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Make an effort to visit SCHWABACHER LANDING spot....Schwabacher's Landing, located inside Grand Teton National Park, is a launch site on the Snake River for photographers ......... Watch for wildlife, as this flat river area is home to moose, elk, deer, antelope, coyote, beaver, otter, eagles and abundant waterfowl. The trail meanders along the banks of the Snake River past beaver dams and partially chewed trees. Throughout the hike are breathtaking views of the Teton Mountains and their reflections in the water....

    GRAND TETONS
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    • Mountain Climbing

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  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Fort Bridger

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Fort Bridger began as a simple trading post established by Jim Bridger and Louis Vasquez in 1843 to service the emigrants as a supply stop along the Oregon Trail. It was obtained by the Mormons in the early 1850's and then became a military outpost in 1858. It very location was essential to the western expansions of mountain men, Indians, emigrants, Pony Express, overland stage, the Union, and the U.S. Army.

    It remained U.S. government property until 1890. It was later abondon and many of the buildings where sold and moved off. Then in 1933 is was dedicated as a historical landmark and museum.

    Site Grounds open year-round 8 a.m. to sunset, daily.

    Museum
    May 1-Sept. 30: 9 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Daily. Weekends and by appointment when staff is available.

    Oct. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Weekends and by appointment when staff is available.
    Nov. 1 - Apr. 30: Closed

    Bridger-Vasquez Co. 1840s Trading Post
    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • crazywabbit's Profile Photo

    Old faithful Greyser

    by crazywabbit Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Old Faithful, certainly the most famous geyser, is joined by numerous others big and small, named and unnamed. Though born of the same water and rock, what is enchanting is how differently they play in the sky.

    old faithful geyser
    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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    Devil's Tower

    by crazywabbit Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The spectacular rock formation known as Devils Tower and the surrounding countryside, home to a myriad of plant and animal life, attract visitors from around the world. Climbers test their skills on vertical rock walls. Visitors delight in the beauty of the area and enjoy the activites offered at the monument. American Indians consider the area sacred, a place for prayer and renewal.

    devil's tower
    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Homanded's Profile Photo

    Oxbow Bend - wildlife viewing

    by Homanded Written Jan 13, 2011

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    Oxbow Bend is one of my favorite areas of the park.
    Besides tranquility, it is also one of the most scenic overlooking the entire range of the tetons with Mt. Moran having the starring role.
    Canoeing, wildlife watching and ranger talks are all popular in this area.

    Make sure and stay awhile with your binoculars, chances are you will spot moose or swans or white pelicans all enjoying the lake.

    Getting the perfect shot - Fall of 2009 Mt Moran after an early snow - fall 2009 Summer sunset Mid day on Mt. Moran Snake Rier Overlook

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    one of the hikes that started it all for me

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 17, 2009

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    Though I was truly introduced to hiking in New Zealand the previous year, the summer of 1994 was the year I really fell in love with it. Three long day hikes were the cornerstones to my eventually wanting to backpack. One was in Olympic National Park in Washington State, another was in Rocky Mountain National Park and perhaps my favorite was the Paintbrush Canyon/Cascade Canyon Loop in Grand Teton National Park.

    It is very long 19 mile trek that climbs over 4000 feet as it encompasses going over the Paintbrush Divide at nearly 11000 feet. If you are looking to see a lot of amazing landscape all in a day this is the walk for you. It is possibly the most scenic hiking loop in the US National Park system. You will see both Holly Lake and Lake Solitude along with two incredible glacial valleys and amazing views of the Tetons and surrounding peaks. You also take in a great hike altitude pass that will leave you breathless as you cross it.

    This is a long day hike so start early and be certain you are in shape for it as it's a killer. I will never forget this day hike. No sooner did we begin the hike, we saw a large male moose with rack just off the trail. The climb up was steady but we were in great shape and carrying very little so we pretty much flew up the Paintbrush Divide. Lake Solitude was amazing and all I can remember is wanting to spend more time in Cascade Canyon, it that beautiful. But when you do big day hikes like this, you don't have time to stop and really smell the paintbrush.

    We did this loop as a three-day two-night trip in 2008 and it was far more pleasurable. It was also free camping. All we had to do was carry all our gear 19 miles and over an 11000 foot pass! Check out my Grand Teton National Park page to read details on how to do this great backpacking trip!

    These photos are from the 1994 hike.

    me at Lake Solitude in 1994 moose off trail, my camera sucked back then! Kristin and I hiking the Loop in 1994 heading up Painbrush Canyon in 1994 starting at String Lake in 1994
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    • Backpacking

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    Devil's Tower National Monument

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 17, 2009

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    Devil's Tower National Monument was established in 1906 to protect the monolith aptly called Devil's Tower. This striking sheer rock formation rises dramatically nearly 1300 feet from its surrounding plateau and sits at over 5000 feet above sea level. With the formation being made of dark red sandstone, it would be easy to construe that its name comes from the red hue it emanates, especially at sunset but it was a more typical bastardization of its Indian name: Bad God's Tower. This stems back to its 1875 "discovery" by the white man though it was obviously a place of great significance to Native Americans for hundreds of years prior.

    The park is located in the remote northeast corner of Wyoming and more easily reached by those already visiting Badlands National Park and Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. There are 8 miles of hiking trails in the park, the most popular of which is the paved 1.3 mile path around the base of the Devil's Tower. About 1% of all visitors climb the sheer rock and it is a technical climb.

    It costs $10 for a carload of people to enter the National Monument or $5 for individuals. The America the Beautiful Pass gets you into all National Parks and Monuments for up a year for $80 per carload so well worth it if you are visiting other parks in the area.

    I did a quick stop here on my 1994 trip around the US National Parks and at the time, unbeknownst to me, National Monuments were not included on the National Parks pass of the day. I think we paid $5 to get in and it was the last Monument we went to.

    Ironically, on our most recent trip around the western US National Park system in 2008, we did not make it to Devil's Tower despite my wife having not been. It was just a bit too far out of the way time-wise and with gas going for about $4.50 a gallon that summer!

    Devil's Tower from my 1994 trip
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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Jackson

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 15, 2009

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    As if Grand Teton National Park was not grand enough in its own right, it just so happens to have one of the great National Park gateway towns right on its doorstep: Jackson. Sure, it's touristy and a bit overblown but Jackson is full of not only amenities but also lots of wild west charm even if in a Disney kind of way. As the hub of not only the two National Parks to the north of it, but also the National Elk Refuge literally on top of it and countless ski resorts that make it a year round destination. While trinket shops litter its western-style covered walkways they are interspersed with many fine shops offering the best in outdoor gear and clothing. Restaurants for all budgets do well in the rare tourist town with no real off-season. Jackson is a prosperous little town and a pleasant one too. Oh, did I forget to mention it is home to one of the top brewpubs in the Rockies? Hop on over to Jackson for a meal, a trinket, or even just a beer. The Tetons will still be there when you get back.

    the hokey Million Dollar Cowboy Bar the historic Teton Theater
    Related to:
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    Yellowstone National Park

    by richiecdisc Updated Dec 14, 2009

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    Yellowstone National Park means different things to different people. As the world's first national park it has an unchallenged pedigree. As a mass of land larger than some countries, it represents many terrains, much of its gentle beauty echoing its Native American roots. As home to a diversity of wildlife not easily viewed elsewhere in North America, it takes on a game park mentality for many of its visitors. Below its surface sprouting into the air for hundreds of feet, Geothermic energy abounds. Whatever your reason for coming to Yellowstone National Park, it is unlikely you will be disappointed. It is the rare park that delivers dreams to a diverse group of devotees, each very much contingent on preconceived ideas and the very vision of what a national park is. For it is the concept of Yellowstone as such that invented this very idea. An idea that many hold close to their hearts and come to see first hand rather than as figments of their imaginations. Experience colors unworldly, hear the howl of the lone wolf or bubbling mud, feel the rumble of buffalo shake the ground on which you stand, and breathe deeply fumes of sulfur or air so pure it pierces your soul. Remember how special our planet is and why it is our duty to preserve it, the very idea of what a national park is, the very idea of Yellowstone.

    Morning Glory Pool at Yellowstone
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Wyoming Things to Do

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