Wind River Travel Guide

  • Wind River Canyon
    Wind River Canyon
    by Basaic
  • Sundance Lake
    Sundance Lake
    by kokoryko
  • Popo Agie River
    Popo Agie River
    by kokoryko

Wind River Things to Do

  • Abraham Lincoln and the piglets

    To make short, if I remember well: Lincoln and a friend were traveling in a coach, and coming upon a bridge over a river, they glimpsed a saw with her little piglets in the river; few piglets were taken away by the current and would drawn soon; Lincoln rolled up his trouser, went into the water and brought the little animals to the shore where...

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  • The red Mercedes; Dave

    Half an hour or so after the red Mercedes passed by, I was thinking to move to the straw stacks, and what comes there? Coming back the guy with his cabriolet; it was a 300SL, I know about nothing about cars, but this one I recognized, a car from the early sixties; the guy stopped nearby and told me, he goes to Jackson; the plate of his car was from...

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  • Gazing at the clouds and other things. ....

    To make it short: I waited on the roadside from 3 pm to 6.30 pm, or so! More than 3 hours waving at the rather rare cars and trucks passing by. . . . . . After two hours I walked on the road till nearby a ranch, which I glimpsed from far; there were huge straw stacks and in case I could not get off from here I would find a place for sleeping, as I...

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  • Where is the stage coach?

    Where is the stage coach? Heavy Eagle and the other IndianFort Washakie is just a small settlement on road 287 between Lander and Jackson, and there is apparently no public transportation, so I began hitchhiking; the first to stop, after a while, was Heavy Eagle, a lady (she presented herself like that), who took me for 2 miles or so, to a...

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  • The Northern side . . . . I will arrive...

    Now the road goes down and the walk is easy, except the pack on my back, which I feel heavier than at the beginning of the trek. The golden flakes of the aspen in the woods help to endure that weight. . . The landscapes north are wide open, and I go up the geological times, looking only at the strata from far in the landscape; I recognize several...

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  • Entering the Indian Reservation

    And now I enter in the Indian reservation; there is no guard at the boundary, hahaha. Well, I should have applied for a permit before entering, but there was no office around, and seriously, if it should have been done before I begin my trek, it is always possible to buy the permit later or to pay a fine! So I keep walking on the road, now again in...

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  • Dickinson Creek

    I left Dickinson creek camp quite early and walked on the dirt road to the North in the bright morning light. It was still cold, but with the sun, it would soon warm up. There was little snow on the meadows and the mountains to the west (Bear’s Ears mountains) (Main picture) were bright in the sky. It was beautiful, all around (picture 2, to the...

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  • Blizzard and minus 10 in the morning.

    It began to snow when I rigged up my tent under the trees on the campground; useless to say I was the only camper there. It did not snow long, but the wind began to blow; he was quiet all day, but now, it began seriously to bend the trees. I checked the herrings of my tent and went to sleep, as I had not a lot more to do, and I was tired. The wind...

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  • Pine trees, meadows. . .

    I finally ended on top of the ridge, and had a look at the map: for the rest of the day it would be flat or slightly down. I was in another river basin, the landscape was different from before, and I began to walk in a dark pine forest; the pines here were different. Ah I began to feel better on almost flat terrain, in the dark forest, looking at...

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  • A horse! My kingdom for a horse!

    And climbing slowly, sweating, in poor mood and spirit, I heard suddenly horses not far, the characteristic noise of the hoofs on the soil and rocks. Few seconds later, two riders on their horses appeared in front of me, and stopped beside me. They wore orange jackets (to be seen from far, because it is hunting season), were very warmly clothed,...

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  • Climbing again

    After my rest at Sanford Park I resumed walking, a bit at high pace as I wanted to reach Dickinson Park in time to make my camp there; I had to leave the Popo Agie Valley and across a ridge, reach the Little Wind River Basin; so, a climbing trail again. Climbing in the pine forest was not difficult, the trail well marked, the views beautiful, but....

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  • Little animals. . . . .

    When I walk, like most of people I look where I put my feet, and I also try to look around, and my other senses are awake, I listen to the birds and other animals (The squirrels are very noisy!), and some very small unexpected animals are also on the trail. I was very surprised to find this very anonymous (to me!) butterfly, here at 2600 m...

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  • A visitor?

    I camped that night in the forest after having crossed the river, not far from the shore under pine trees which looked healthy; there was still a bit snow here further down in the valley but the weather was not threatening. I slept very well until. . . . . . I was awaked by a strange noise (a sort of repetitive grunting) coming from the area where...

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  • Food and mushrooms

    I like good food, but on a trekking tour I forget about; if I am out for a few days, I try to carry as light as possible, and lyophilized food is the best solution; hot water, wait 5 minutes, it is ready. For a few days a normal person can stand it out (astronauts are exceptional people, eating lyophilized stuff for weeks long. . . . ), but I like...

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  • Bathing the feet at river crossings

    Usually the trails follow the easiest way to proceed on the field, so it is wise to keep on, and when it crosses rivers there is a reason; here it is the meanders of the river when going against cliffs, or boulder fields; so the trail tries to follow the flat banks as much as possible and to do so, the river has to be crossed at some fords. On the...

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  • The pine forest

    The North Fork Trail follows the Popo Agie River on its left bank, but sometimes moves away, going up in the pine forest, becoming a narrow trail crossing small brooks, offering views over the valley between the trees; on some places dead tree are lying on the trail, other dangerously hang on each other, all this too keeps a bit the trekker on...

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  • The little beautiful Unnamed lake

    One wonderful thing in wilderness is that you also come across places which have no names (on the map at least); Two and a half kilometers East of Lonesome lake is a small lake on the left side of the PopoAgie, that has no name; this small jewel is nested at the feet of firs on its north side, the other sides are meadows; I left Lonesome lake less...

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  • Along Popo Agie River

    What does a trekker on trek? When he does not sleep, dream, look at landscapes, etc, he walks! So I went ahead now, down the river; my first plan was to turn left soon and climb the Lizard Head trail, but there was a lot of snow and the map showed I had to go through wide open rocky areas, in wind exposed terrain; I chose to keep along the valley...

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  • Some tracks of big animals,. . . .

    After having left the lake and now walking on the North Fork trail, reaching the first trees on the left shore (first river crossing. . . ) I came across euuuuh, (pictures 3 and 4) . Yes it is bear ***, and it does not look very old and dry; so this friend is in fact not far, I should open my eyes (but he also might already have felt my presence...

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  • Marvellous blueberries

    Those who buy blueberry jelly or jam in the supermarket do not know what blueberries are! These here are almost the same I pick (and eat) every summer in Auvergne, and when I begin to pick, I have difficulty to stop! So there were lots of blueberry shrubs near the shore of the lake, and some of them had still lots of fruit; I picked and ate with...

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  • Lonesome Lake

    A little tour around the lake (no, in fact I did not make the whole tour, only half, but the whole tour seems easy in summer), to have other views and see more of the towers; the snow was not very thick here, and soft, as the little trees show. Warbonnet and Warrior 1 on the two first pictures; a few clouds were forming near the peaks. I Had a rest...

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  • The Cirque of the Towers

    This place is very visited by climbers in summer; I am not at all a climber (except few “easy“ summits of the Pyrenees), and if the sheer vertical walls are appealing, in some way, I was admiring the Towers for their beauty only, their beauty and the beauty of the place; it was the nature with power and beauty for me, nothing more (and nothing...

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  • Down to Lonesome Lake

    Small clouds begin to gather around the first Warrior peak (Main picture); further west, the second Warrior stands high in the sky; these are the first towers you see on your left when you arrive at Jackass Pass; the other towers are still in the far, I will face them when I will be at the lake.The three next pictures show how the colors of...

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  • Jackass pass

    And here, in front of me is the famous Cirque of the Towers! I see it from 3270 m elevation. All these peaks cutting into the sky! I had to sit down, have a rest, drink a coffee, then enjoy (what a poor word!) the view! I had seen some of the towers before when walking up on the side of the small brook flowing down from the pass (picture 2) Looking...

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  • Passing above Arrowhead Lake

    The snow surface is hard, but I do not need crampons; the wind and cold created this glimmering surface on the snow; the first peaks of the Cirque of the Towers appear behind the ridge; left is one of the “Warriors”.I look back South and there are the Dogtooth and the Monolith watching the tiny little guy walking on the snow! (picture 2) What looks...

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  • Trail up to Arrowhead Lake

    Sundance pinnacle was standing in the blue sky above the lake and the snow covered shores, I will now have him in my back, walking up to Arrowhead lake. The trail did not fully disappear, and I liked walking up between the firs, I had put gaiters on my boots: I like to be close to nature but not to the point of walking with wet cold feet! The map...

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  • The wonderful morning greeting

    You feel wonderfully well, awaking in a warm sleeping bag, but when it is time to get out . . . . huh, brrrrrr, I already knew it was cold, from the steam I breathed out; the wet clothes from yesterday were rigid from the ice. All was so silent, so quiet, not even a bird calling; It opened my tent and looked up: blue. . . blue sky, no one cloud!...

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  • Where is the trail?

    Before getting asleep, I thought about the past day and of the next day, specially wondering if I would find the trail tomorrow. When I was walking in the boulder field, I was not sure to keep on the trail all time; now with the snow, it would even be more problematic to find the trail. I took picture 1 in the evening, it is a color picture! (not...

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  • Snow greets me when arriving at Sundance...

    I was happy to finally get out of the boulder fields, the snow began to fall seriously, and in the mist, I began to have strange thoughts; when you do not have visibility (night, or dense fog), your other senses (other than the view) tend to be more acute, but as you are not used to use them, they bring lots of information you do not know how to...

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  • Now it goes up, but where is the trail?

    The American hikers, surveyors, map makers, . . . . have imagination when naming the places but here, it is a bit boring with the names: I was on Big Sandy Trail, now I will walk on Big Sandy Pass Trail. . . and if I had taken East I would have gone on Little Sandy Trail. . . . hahaWell, now Big Sandy Pass Trail: I knew from the “Joe Kelsey” it...

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  • Along Big Sandy, a last encounter before...

    The Big Sandy river is very small here, a few meters wide stream running over big boulders, in a small valley; further south it becomes a wide river fed by many brooks and rills which finally joins the Green River 100 km south from where I am walking; I am heading to its origin a few kilometers upstream. The trail goes up in the forest leaving the...

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  • Bonjour, Wind River!

    Breakfast, cleaning up the camp, pack on the back, and let’s go. . . . . The trail begins on the right shore of the Big Sandy River, heading North East; a bit of sun but it becomes cloudy very quickly this morning; few birds (sorts of jays) greeted me in the morning, waiting I finish my breakfast (ha! They got already used to the travelers who...

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  • Arrival at Big Sandy trailhead.

    On my Wyoming page, I already wrote how I reached the trailhead, reminding me some central Asian “adventures”; late afternoon, I stepped out of the car, said bye to the driver, put my pack on my back and there I go. . . . ah, only more or less one mile to reach the camp ground, walking on a rough road across meadows, along the Big Sandy river. The...

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Wind River Warnings and Dangers

  • Visitors, register please. . . .

    When you enter wilderness areas, do not think about fast rescue, cell phones are not working, and you may not meet anybody for a few days. If you die, leave somewhere some identification, so the forest administration can send back your remains to your family. . . . Oooops, seriously, it is a safety rule to at least leave your name and coordinates...

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  • Packing list to avoid dangers (second...

    A bit more on your list:A minimum safety kit including analgesic bandages, (morphine, if you are not alone) which I did not need, but again, you never know. Think about how much food you will need; note that on trek, you use lots of energy, and often, because you are tired you do not feel hungry, but you must eat (and drink).Glacier sunglasses.And...

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  • At last:Warnings and dangers...

    I will not give a lot of advice as interested trekkers already know what they need, usually, and I will not give a trekking course; I just can tell the Earthwalk map is a very good one, it is even waterproof! So, easy to carry in a side picket of the pants. Knowing where you are when trekking is vital!No real advice about warning and dangers or so;...

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