Roosevelt Arch, Yellowstone National Park

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  • As we take Yellowstone's North Entrance this time
    As we take Yellowstone's North Entrance...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Yellowstone NP beckons beyond Roosevelt Arch
    Yellowstone NP beckons beyond Roosevelt...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • The arch is on the edge of town
    The arch is on the edge of town
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Roosevelt Arch stands alone

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Oct 10, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Yellowstone NP beckons beyond Roosevelt Arch
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    In the early years of Yellowstone National Park, most visitors entered via the North Entrance at Gardiner, Montana. Because the number of visitors entering this way rose even higher following the arrival of the Northern Pacific Railroad at Gardiner in 1903, it was decided to build a more majestic stone structure for the entrance to this first (1872) National Park in the world.

    Being an avid outdoors man, President Theodore Roosevelt was vacationing in Yellowstone when construction began and he agreed take part in the laying of the cornerstone. Roosevelt was honoured by having the 50-ft tall basalt rock arch named after him during its 6-month construction period in 1903.

    In our case, we were headed back into Yellowstone NP again just before 9 AM on a Saturday morning, so stopped to take a few photos of both the arch and other wooden structures letting visitors know where they were!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Park's North Entrance in Montana

    by Ewingjr98 Written Nov 6, 2008

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    While the vast majority of Yellowstone in Wyoming, a small sliver of the park is in Montana and Idaho. In total, 96 percent of park is located within Wyoming, while 3 percent is within Montana, with the remaining 1 percent in Idaho.

    The primary northern entrance to the park is at Gardiner, Montana, and is marked by the famous Roosevelt Arch, whose cornerstone was laid by President Roosevelt himself in 1903. South of the arch, the first five miles of US Route 89 is designated as the North Entrance Road Historic District. The state line is about three miles south of the arch, and at the southern end of this district is historic Fort Yellowstone, now the park headquarters.

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  • GuthrieColin's Profile Photo

    Roosevelt Arch

    by GuthrieColin Updated Feb 10, 2006

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    Roosevelt Arch

    The Roosevelt Arch is a much more fitting entrance than the tool booth on the west entrance. It more accurately depicts the grandeur of the park. Across the front of the arch reads "For the benefit and enjoyment of the people." and it was built for that exact purpose. To begin the National Parks movement in the United States.
    It was built from February to August of 1903 and cost 10,000.00 $. It measures 50 feet tall and has an opening of 30' high and 25' wide. The road travels beneath it and the true appreciation of this landmark comes with knowing that the National Parks Service basically started at this point.

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    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    The Original Entrance to Yellowstone

    by kazander Updated Sep 8, 2005

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    Roosevelt Arch

    Roosevelt Arch is the north entrance's gateway into Yellowstone National Park. This is the original entrance into the park. Visitors would take the train into Montana, and ride in stagecoaches to this entrance. This Arch was created in 1903. President Theodore Roosevelt was visiting the park at the time. He placed the cornerstone for the arch, hence it took his name. The arch is inscribed with the words "For the benefit and enjoyment of the people" which is taken from the Organic Act of 1872, which made Yellowstone our nation's first national park.

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    • National/State Park

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  • annk's Profile Photo

    "For the Benefit and Enjoyment of the People"

    by annk Updated Aug 17, 2003

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    Entrance Arch

    is inscribed on the Theodore Roosevelt Entrance Arch. The park was created in 1872 to "preserve and protect the natural wonders of the region". The arch was built in 1903 and is located just outside the park in Gardiner, Montana.

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    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    The Entrance to Yellowstone

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Aug 26, 2005

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    Roosevelt Arch

    On the south side of Gardiner, MT is the north entrance to the park marked by the Roosevelt Arch. This is the park's most distinctive entrance.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

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  • sunnywong's Profile Photo

    Roosevelt Arch

    by sunnywong Written Feb 25, 2003

    This is at the original entrance to Yellowstone at Gardiner, Montana. It was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt.

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    • Family Travel

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