Unique Places in Buenos Aires

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by GentleSpirit
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    Patio Andaluz
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  • Patio Andaluz
    Patio Andaluz
    by GentleSpirit

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Buenos Aires

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    Estancias: a day in the countryside

    by sabrina_florida Updated Jan 28, 2014

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    Either as a day or as a weekend trip, going to an estancia is a great choice. These usually consist of colonial houses sorrounded by extense parks, located in the countryside.
    They played an important part in the Argentinean society in the past, but nowadays they are used as locations for wedding receptions as well as a place where to unwind at the weekends.
    You can spend a day there (the lunch includes barbecue of course, and other typical foods from the countryside) walking around its parks, swimming in the pool, taking a nap under a big tree and horse riding. It's also a good way of escaping from the city, so most estancias offer rooms. Also, they offer the possibility of seeing what life is like in the countryside, and you'll meet gauchos, our cowboys.
    Plenty of them are located 1 or 2 hours away from Buenos Aires. There are different sorts of estancias, some being very luxurious.
    Check the website below to choose the one that suits you most. It has an English version.

    A typical view of an estancia An estancia not far from downtown Buenos Aires A gaucho making barbecue (asado)

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    Plaza Embajada de Israel

    by GentleSpirit Written Jul 29, 2013

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    On March 17, 1992 a bomb exploded at the corner of Arroyo and Suipacha streets at what was then the Israeli Embassy to Argentina. This terrorist attack claimed the lives of 29 persons. In 2000 this site was set aside to memorialize the victims of this tragedy. The names of the victims are inscribed on the plaque and trees were planted in this nice quiet place

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    Reloj Siemens (The Siemens Clock)

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 29, 2013

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    This sculpture sits atop the old Siemens Building at the intersection of Julio Roca and Bolivar Street. The building was built by the Siemens Corporation in 1935, though it was only occupied by them until 1948, when it became the Female Workers Home under one of Evita's programs.

    The building stands out because its style is so different from the surrounding buildings. The clock is excellent, the statues touch their mallets to the bell on the hour.

    Reloj Siemens
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    Statue of Eva Peron

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 29, 2013

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    This statue is located in front of the National Library on Avenida Libertador. I found it pretty amazing that it was the only statue honoring Eva Peron in Buenos Aires at the time of my last visit, especially with the enormous fame and adoration she achieved during her life.

    The statue is the work of Argentine sculptor Ricardo Gianetti and was inaugurated on December 3, 1999.

    You might get the impression that this statue is almost an afterthought, or is too far out of the way. Well, to a certain point it is. The military government wanted no memorialization at all of the Peron family. In fact, the place where the statue stands now is directly in front of what used to be the Unzue Palace, the presidential palace where Evita died. This was demolished by the military government once Peron had been removed from power. (note- though Evita has a statue in Buenos Aires, her husband, Juan Peron, does not! Perhaps it would still be too polarizing.)

    I was somewhat mystified about the appearance of the statue itself. In it, Evita appears unnaturally gaunt, almost lost, like she is running away from something.

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    Colonia Uruguay

    by xaver Written Apr 28, 2013

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    We went for a day trip from Buenos Aires to Colonia de Sacramento in Uruguay. It's possible to do that in a day as there are fast ferries and Colonia is a very small town. We left from Buenos Aires at 1 pm and got back at 10 pm, the return ticket with a short walking excursion in Colonia was 240 pesos. The company was cloniaexpress but we had delays both going and coming back. http://www.coloniaexpress.com/ar

    colonia express feryy
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    Plaza Mitre

    by GentleSpirit Written Mar 10, 2013

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    I was walking around Recoleta enjoying the architecture on a lovely sunny day. On a small hill you will notice a lot of people just relaxing, taking in the sun. There were a lot of couples as well from what I remember.

    The equestrian statue (and who the plaza is named for) is Bartolome Mitre, (1821-1906). Mitre was a journalist by trade. Later, from 1862-8 he was President of Argentina. He was a political liberal (though the labels in Argentina are quite different) who opposed the dictatorship of Juan Manuel De Rosas. For this he was exiled, staying in various Southern Cone countries and working as a journalist and author. He returned to Argentina after De Rosas was defeated and was elected to various posts in Buenos Aires government.

    It's a nice place to take a break from the hustle and bustle

    Location
    Av. del Libertador (corner of Agüero)

    ps- sorry, my photo wasn't very good!

    Statue of Bartolome Mitre in Plaza  Mitre
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    Monumento de los españoles

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 8, 2013

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    This is called the Monument to the Magna Carta and the Four Regions of Argentina. It is located on Libertador and Sarmiento in the Palermo district. It is commonly called the Monument of the Spaniards and was donated by the Spanish community in Argentina in 1910 for the centennial of the May Revolution. The sculptures at the base of the statue represent the 4 regions of Argentina- The Pampas, Andes, Chaco and the River Plate.

    Monumento de los espa��oles
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    Moumento Francia a Argentina

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 8, 2013

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    To commemorate 100 years of Argentine Independence, the French community in Buenos Aires commissioned this statue. The marble and granite statue is the work of the french sculptor Emile Peynot. Located by Av. Levene and Libertador, this monument shows scenes of the storming of the Bastille during the French Revolution as well as the crossing of the Andes by San Martin. The two female angels represent the two countries, France and Argentina.

    Monumento Francia a Argentina
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    Visit an Estancia

    by GentleSpirit Written Feb 18, 2013

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    A nice day trip from Buenos Aires is a journey out to the estancias in Buenos Aires Province. It will take you about 1.5-2 hours to get there. You'll get to see the the estancias, some of them quite luxurious, get a great display of horsemanship by the gauchos and eat a nice meal (of bife, what else!)

    Please take a look at my San Antonio de Areco pages here

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    British flags

    by cadiana88 Updated Jan 29, 2013

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    In the "Iglesia de Santo Domingo" , you can find behind the Altar, four captured British flags during the British Invasions in the years 1806 and 1807. In both ocassions, when Argentina was yet a spanish colony, local troops rejected to the invaders.

    Belgrano Av. and Defensa Street
    (between Plaza de Mayo and San Telmo)

    Santo Domingo church
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    Statue of George Washington

    by GentleSpirit Written Oct 1, 2012

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    The Statue of George Washington, first President of the United States of America is across from the US Embassy in Buenos Aires. Located at the Plazoleta Grl Paez. This statue was a gift of the people of the United States to honor the May Revolution. Inaugurated on July 4, 1913. This statue is the work of Charles Keck

    George Washington in Buenos Aires
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  • Bike tours beyond downtown

    by nepok1000 Updated Apr 8, 2012

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    Buenos Aires, like Barcelona, Paris or London is definitelly a city of villages and neighbourhoods. Nothing better than renting a bike and go exploring it's contrasts and the unique identity of every single street.

    The company BA Bikes gives you maps for self guided tours around the less publiciced atractions and also has cool bike tours beyond downtown. Don't miss Parque Lezama (the place where BA was founded in 1536), Catalinas Sur and the BA Rosegarden. Definitely off the beaten track, all in one afternoon.

    15 USD for a bike all day and 30 USD for guided bike tours. Probably the cheapest price in town and really good and strong bikes.

    www.babikes.com.ar - www.facebook.com/babikes

    Parque Lezama Bike lanes Near the Rosegardens Puerto Madero Catalinas Sur
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    El Gato Viejo - Metalworks Art Museum

    by DSwede Written Jan 27, 2012

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    While exploring the city's less traveled paths and corridors, I found a unique little jem. This emerging museum, as the curator calls it is all about an artists passion, talent and ability to turn complete metallic rubbish into lifelike works of sculpture art.

    In the fringes between the industrial parks and the green spaces of the Buenos Aires is the El Gato Viejo museum. It is both an open air museum and a metallic workshop.

    Outside, you will see unique dinosaurs like the Retrosaurus, made from old adding and typing machines, airplanes and animals.

    The museum will likely be open even if nobody is there since it run by the single proprietor, Carlos Regazzoni. However the posted hours are Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 5pm until 9pm.

    Location is on Suipacha, at the intersection of Avenida del Libertador. On the opposite side of the road from the hotel.

    Street crocodiles
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    San Isidro

    by vtveen Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Coming back from our visit to Tigre we decided to make a stop in San Isidro.
    From the railway station we took Belgrano Street; specially the second part of this shopping street offers some nice upscale shops, a cute mall and a nice (side walk) café.

    This part of the town shows clearly that San Isidro is a attractive suburb with tree lined and cobble stoned streets with some very nice mansions and villas. At Av. Libertador, on top of the hill, we reached the French neo gothic Cathedral, built in 1895 on the place of the original church. Take also a look inside this impressive church, which has place for 3000 people.

    San Isidro offers a look on Argentinian life, which is quite different from the way of living in Buenos Aires.

    San Isidro is accessible by train via the Tigre Line from Retiro (or Tigre).
    It is also possible to take the Mitre Line from Retiro to Mitre and to transfer there on the ‘Tren de la Costa’. (info Tren de la Costa: http://www.trendelacosta.com.ar/web/)

    San Isidro: cathedral

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  • Neighborhood Cafes

    by EMGasu Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    People say there is a cafe on every Buenos Aires corner. Many times they are called "bars", but please do not think of them as typical American style bars (dark, crowded, neon lights, beer drinking). Nor they serve a variety of elaborated meals: BA cafes are equally suitable morning, day or night, they are often well lit, and the idea is to find a nice table by a window, sip a cup of coffee in a nice demitasse (no paper or plastic cups), maybe munch one or two medialunas (croissants) and watch life go by.

    Now where are the best cafes? Your hotel concierge will probably suggest some nice places downtown (most noticeably Cafe Tortoni) or in San Telmo, the bohemian district. And they are all very good... but they are mostly for tourists. Don't get me wrong, locals are welcome and they do visit every now and then -but they don't hang out there.

    There is a very complete list of historic bars / cafes on this website:

    http://www.buenosaires.gov.ar/areas/turismo/actividades/?menu_id=74&info=bares

    Click under "todos" and the list will appear. Some are true hidden gems, some are not, so here is my highly subjective list of the Best Neighborhood Cafes in BA (sort by name / address / neighborhood):

    Cafe Argos - Av. Federico Lacroze 3499 - Colegiales (my VERY OWN neighborhood cafe!) - Metro
    Cafe Margot - Boedo 857 - Boedo - Metro
    Cafe El Coleccionista - Av. Rivadavia 4929 - Caballito - Metro
    Cafe Dante - Boedo 745 - Boedo - Metro
    Bar Aragon - Av. Juan B. Alberdi 4899 - Villa Luro
    Britanico - Brasil 399 - San Telmo
    Bar Oviedo - Av Lisandro de la Torre 2407 - Mataderos
    Cafe de Garcia - Sanabria 3302 - Villa Devoto

    With the exception of the Britanico, these places are far from the tourist circuit, but all of them are in perfectly safe areas and no more than 30 min on average by cab from downtown. Those listed as "Metro" have close access by subway. All others are easily accessible by bus.

    Don't be afraid to try them. In all cases, these off the beaten path cafes are guaranteed to make you feel like a local! Enjoy!

    Friends at the Argos, my top favorite cafe.
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