Evita Museum - Museo Evita, Buenos Aires

4 out of 5 stars 11 Reviews

Lafinur 2988, Buenos Aires +54 11 4807-0306

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  • The grand entrance hall
    The grand entrance hall
    by Orchid
  • Two Perons
    Two Perons
    by Orchid
  • Detail of balustrade
    Detail of balustrade
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  • Orchid's Profile Photo

    The Story of an Icon

    by Orchid Updated May 9, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Whilst most visitors to Buenos Aires seek out Eva Peron's final place of rest at the Recoleta Cemetery, the Museo Evita (entry 50 Pesos), fleshes out the story of this most well known Argentinian.

    The museum is housed in a former ‘temporary home’, set up by one of Eva Peron’s numerous social committees to assist women who were visiting Buenos Aires to sort out documentation problems. The museum tells the story of the ambitious young woman who became a powerful figure in her husband’s government, and achieved much in her short life. Whether the story told is hagiography or a fair statement of history is difficult to tell for those unschooled in Argentina’s history, but the museum is well set out with artifacts, videos and documents. Eva's efforts in social welfare for the less fortunate are given a well deserved priority.
    Particularly striking are the many audio visual presentations, which give a sense of the passion of those times in the early 1950s. The extravagant mass mourning which accompanied Eva's funeral presages the modern fad most evident in the mass hysteria which followed the untimely death of Diana Spencer in 1997, and which trumps the mourning of citizens of the DPRK over the deaths of the ruling Kim dynasty.

    And the mansion in which it is housed is itself very beautiful. Built for the Carabassa family during the 20th century, architect Estanislao Pirovano used elements from both the Plateresque and Italian Renaissance styles in its decoration.

    There is also a restaurant and a shop attached.

    Tuesdays to Sundays (and holidays) from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

    Two Perons Detail of balustrade The grand entrance hall Death Mask The lady herself
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    Museo de Evita

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To this day there is a mystique about Eva Peron, the wife of General (later President) Juan Peron. Many Argentines see her as something almost approaching a saint, the exemplification of a soul full of compassion and caring for others. She did, in fact, hold a title of "Spiritual Leader of the Nation." Others see her as a convenient attachment, whose charisma was used by Peron to further his own political goals. You often get the same treatment of her in the books that have been written about her, some are fawning works while others are much more critical.

    The Museo de Evita opened in 2002, 50 years after Evita's death. The building that houses the museum once housed single mothers with children for the Eva Peron Foundation. It is a mansion in a good neighborhood, and the placement of the shelter at the time was perhaps a challenge to the Argentine establishment.

    The museum is a good one. It does have a great deal of exhibits, ranging from Evita's humble beginnings to her shoes and dresses when she was at the height of power, She definitely was an elegant woman, Though some of the exhibits tend towards the saintly treatment of her, some of the others, those dealing with her political role, often are a bit difficult to grasp.

    Evita is generally credited with being the reason that women received the right to vote in 1947. She was active in feminist causes and efforts for the common people that had little or no power in society. This museum will give you a good overview of her life and accomplishments. Though a lot of people might find the exhibits a bit too detailed, this is a very nice museum. This is not a must-see in Buenos Aires, but you will learn a great deal about a woman that even today is controversial.

    The museum has a little snack bar and gift shop. Their coffee is excellent!

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    Santa Evita: Museo Evita

    by ellielou Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's probably difficult for most people to go to Buenos Aires and NOT to think of Evita. (And there was no singing from the Andrew Lloyd Weber musical....)

    The Museo Evita is exactly what you'd expect: a lovely building, and basically a hagiology of the life of Eva Duarte Peron. It is, however, in a great building, the multimedia parts of the museum are well done, and there's an incredibly chilling video concerning what happened to Evita's body after her death.

    It's also a fairly good place to get a gift or two for the Evita fan on your list.

    love her, hate her, sing showtunes about her
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    MUSEO EVITA

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This new museum, located in a former temporary home for women in need run by the Fundacion Eva Peron, has yet to make it into many of the guidebooks, but with time, it has potential to attract visitors galore. The building is a beautiful and dates to the early 20th century – extensively remodeled in 1923. It was purchase by Fundacion Eva Peron in 1948 as Temporary House #2. Touring the museum you can gain an insight into this very dynamic Argentine woman – each room devoted to a chapter of her life, from beginnings to death and beyond. Even without the incredibly successful shows by Andrew Lloyd Webber and movie adaptation by Allan Parkes, Evita was one of the most important personages in Argentine history. In her short run at the side of Juan Peron, she was able to bring the vote to women, establish social foundations desperately lacking in Argentina, solidify political support for her husband and do everything with a grace and style seldom seen on this scale. She was also a great polarizer within this polarized world – her enemies, both the landowning oligarchs among whom she is buried with in la Recoleta and the Army – at least, those not directly supporting her husband – despised her in levels that are really only hinted at in both the musical/movie and here also at the museum. Evita was certainly much more than a song or movie – though that is how most foreigners know her. Admire or despise her – she was not a topic of discussion during much of the dark 30-year military rule that followed the overthrow of Peron in 1955. She is by far the most important woman in Argentine history and probably the most charismatic of all. You can begin understanding he better here at this museum.

    Entrance to Museo Evita on Lafinur
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    Palermo - Museo Evita

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 22, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not far from the Jardin Botanico, the museum presents Evita's life and the social work she had done. The museum is housed in the former building of Evita's Social Aid Foundation and the building was an emergency home for homeless families. The museum has some amazing pieces including the dresses she wore in high society. There are excellent videos of her being involved in the social work; when she went on her "Rainbow Tour" of Europe and scenes in the city after her death. It was felt the museum was partial to Evita and did not really refer to the political and personal controversaries she was involved with during her life. However, I highly recommended it for getting a further insight to Evita's life.

    Evita mural Visions
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  • jakelorenzo's Profile Photo

    All Things Evita

    by jakelorenzo Updated Apr 24, 2009

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    The Museo Evita is a loving and educational tribute to Evita Peron. It is well done, mixing modern audio-visual projections with actual artifacts, documents, clothing, etc. from Evita and her life. There are English translations of each portion of the exhibit. You learn about Evita's great contributions to the sufragette movement in Argentina and to her dedication to the poor. Her activist work on behalf of education, peace and health is well documented as are her tragic illness, early death and excrutiating burial tribulations. After visiting Museo Evita, you'll want to learn more about her and Argentina. You can't ask much more than that from a museum.

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  • Marthamaire's Profile Photo

    Eva Peron Museum

    by Marthamaire Written Mar 31, 2009

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    If you love history, don't skip the Eva Peron Museum. It is located in a residential area that is easily accessible by the underground transit system. When I went there, there was only one other person, so I have the feeling that when you go you will not find crowds and be pushed through the exhibits by overworked museum guards. The museum is laid out in a circular floorplan arranged in chronological order. One of the most charming things is the fact that next to many of the huge photos of Evita on display, the actual dresses she wore in the photographs are displayed in glass cases.
    In one room, film clips from her movies are run over and over while in another, the same is true for news clips. Eva had "it" and it jumps out from the screen at you. Some of the displays are old Argentian school books showing Eva comforting a child; samples of the toys, bedding, clothes and books she distributed to the poor through her Foundation. When you enter, you will be given a guide book. The one in English contained this: "She did much for many in such a short time, probably with lots of mistakes. But her works remain in the hearts of the so many she helped along the road of dignity and social justice."

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Museo Evita

    by barryg23 Updated Mar 3, 2009

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    If you´re interested in learning about the life of Eva Peron, Argentina`s most well known lady, the Evita Museum is worth a visit. The museum is housed in Palermo, in a building that the Juan Peron government bought while in power, and it contains some of Evita`s personal possessions as well as TV and film footage of the lady and information about her life.

    The museum did seem a little too uncritical of an obviously controversial politician, who polarised public opinion in her lifetime, but overall there was enough information to make it worth a visit. There was no sign of the musical or film in the gift shop though - perhaps it wasn´t so well received in Argentina. The museum is far more expansive than other BA museums, though I think there is a special, two-tier pricing system with non-Argentineans paying more.

    Evita Museum

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  • Tom_In_Madison's Profile Photo

    Museo Evita

    by Tom_In_Madison Updated May 28, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A somewhat thorough museum near the zoo and gardens in BA.

    It covers her childhood briefly, and her life as an actress with videos of her work. Covers her life with Peron of course, and a lot about her marriage, trip to Europe.

    Separate rooms for the vote, her foundation, her illness and some temporary exhibits.

    One thing I liked about this museum is it would show her in a photo, then it would have the exact dress, hat, shoes, etc.. that she was wearing in the photo right there.

    It also has a little cafe for snacks, and a place to buy some Evita books, souvenirs, etc..

    Open 1-7pm winter
    11am - 7pm summer (Nov - april)

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  • coccinella169's Profile Photo

    Museo Eva Perón

    by coccinella169 Written May 2, 2006

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    No, I´m not an "Evita"- fan, but this museum was so close to the place where I was staying in Buenos Aires, so it happened that one day I popped in. The museum is located in a very nice building in Palermo (which is worth a visit for itself). They show the life of Eva Perón from her childhood to her death, there are a lot of her beautiful dresses, personal stuff, photos, letters, old newspaper articles and you can watch videos (with english subtitles as well). And in the last room, there is an odd video of what happened to her body after her death. The museum is open from Tuesday till Sunday from 2.00 p.m. till 7.30 p.m. .

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  • mrtourne's Profile Photo

    Evita Museum

    by mrtourne Written Sep 21, 2005

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    If you want to get a good overview of Evita, the new Museo Evita is actually pretty interesting. Located in the Palermo neighborhood (about a block off Avenida Las Heras, across the Botanical gardens, on Lafinur), the site was one of the many houses that the peronist government expropriated from well-to-do families and turned into homes managed by the Fundacion Evita (in this case, a single mothers' home)

    While some of the exhibits tends towards the adulation (especially the piping of speeches in some rooms through the sound system), there are enough artifacts around that show the other side as well (including some of the infamous reading manuals for first graders saying "I love Evita" replacing the traditional "I love my mom" phrases). The various exhibits track her childhood, her acting days and her rise to power, as well as some of the work done by her Foundation (it's interesting to see how her name made it onto everything that was handed out to the needy, so as to remind them where it came from) There's also some remainders of the activity of the house as a single mother's home (the kitchen for example), plus a number of newsreels that are played and show the demonstrations, speeches, etc. and give you a feel for the time.

    Closed Mondays, only opens in the afternoons (from 2 to 7:30 PM Tuesday through Sunday) so plan accordingly. Entrance fee is $2 for Buenos Aires residents and $5 for tourists.

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