Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires

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  • Plaza de Mayo
    by sof76
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    PLAZA DE MAYO
    by draguza
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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Plaza de Mayo

    by vtveen Updated Aug 14, 2006

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    Plaza de Mayo: obelisco
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    We walked from the Obelisco through the Diagonal Roque Saenz Pena to the Plaza de Mayo with another smaller obelisk. This monument has been built to commemorate the independence from Spain in May 25 of the year 1810. That’s the reason for the present name of the square after a couple of other names.

    ‘Mothers of Plaza de Mayo’ have been demonstrating for years every Thursday at 3:30 in the afternoon around these statue. It seems like this plaza is the place for more demonstrations, at least during our visit the square was full of police waiting for demonstrators of that day.

    The square is surrounded by a couple of important buildings, like the Casa Rosada, the Catredal Metropolitana, the Cabildo and the Banco de la Nacion.

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    Plaza de Mayo

    by midnight_mike Written Jun 12, 2006

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    Plaza de Mayo is the most famous square in Argentina. It is named after the May revolution of 1810. This is where the Case Rosada and the Metropolitan Cathedral are located. In the center is a monument dedicated to Jose de San Martin, who is known as the liberator of South America. He is credited with freeing Argentina, Chile and Peru. There are protests there several times each week. Many of them are the mothers of those who disappeared during the late 1970s. The military dictatorship of that time abducted and murdered thousands of people, many of whom have never been found.

    Before you go to Plaza de Mayo, you might want to ask a porteno if any significant protests are planned for that day. They are typically organized well in advance.

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    Casa Rosada

    by midnight_mike Written Jun 12, 2006

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    For Evita fans, this is probably the top spot on your list of spots related to the former first lady of Argentina. It was from the balcony of the presidential palace, lovingly referred to as the Pink House, that Eva Peron led her infamous rallies. The official name of the building is the Casa de Gobierno. It was built in 1873.

    There is a museum at the back of the building (no admission).

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    Cathedral.

    by euzkadi Written May 23, 2006

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    The Buenos Aires Cathedral is located in the Plaza de Mayo, and is the home of the archibishop. The big neo-clasical façade was built in 1822 by french architec Catelin. The main points of interest of the cathedral are the San Martin mausoleum and the white marble statue of the Cristo of Buenos Aires.

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    The Mausoleum of libertador Jose de San Martin.

    by euzkadi Written May 23, 2006

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    This mausoleum located in the interior of Buenos Aires cathedral was constructed by french sculptor Carriere Belleuse, and is guarded by Granadero´s soldiers. Jose de San Martin gave the independence to the Rio de la Plata country.

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    The Casa Rosada.

    by euzkadi Written May 16, 2006

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    This famous building...(well is not very impressive), is the home of the executive power. It was redesigned by italian architect Francesco Tamburini, and has a museum inside the museo de la Casa Rosada (with marble bust and personal objects of former presidents). It´s watched over by the Grenadiers soldiers.

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    Casa Rosada

    by Dabs Updated Apr 22, 2006

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    Casa Rosada
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    Even if you don't have an opportunity to visit the interior of the Casa Rosada, you almost have to walk by Casa Rosada some time during your visit to Buenos Aires. Located near the Plaza de Mayo, the pink hued Casa Rosada was made famous, at least here in the US, by the movie "Evita" starring Madonna, it was from the balcony here that Eva Peron rallied the masses and Madonna, portraying her, was filmed singing "Don't Cry For Me Argentina". I defy you not to hum the tune as you are walking by!

    There are two theories regarding the pink color of the building, the first is the color scheme was the fusion of the red and white colors of the country's opposing political parties, a second theory states that the original paint contained cow blood to prevent damage from humidity.

    We didn't have a chance to visit the interior, the guidebooks say that the Presidential museum there is free and that it is possible to tour the interior if you reserve in advance at the museum's front desk although the tour does not go out on that famous balcony and and you don't get to belt out "Don't Cry for me Argentina".

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    Metropolitan Cathedral

    by Dabs Updated Apr 22, 2006

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    Metropolitan Cathedral
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    We wandered into the Metropolitan Cathedral by accident, it looked like an impressive building but it certainly didn't look like a cathedral from the outside, in fact from the description in the guidebook, it sounds like the original structure was built in 1745 and it wasn't designated a cathedral until 1836, almost a 100 years later.

    Inside, you'll want to find the tomb of General Jose de San Martin, the "Father of the Nation" who fought for South American freedom alongside Simon Bolivar. I happened to be there at the time of the changing of the guard, well, it wasn't really a changing as both the guards and the replacement guards all marched off together and the tomb was left unguarded. Seems kind of silly to have a tomb guarded if they all get up and leave ;-)

    A detail in the church that I thought was really pretty was the mosaic tile floor with a floral pattern.

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    City Cathedral

    by DPando Written Apr 20, 2006

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    On the same Plaza de Mayo there is this neoclassical building ...great architecture ..its is the main chatedral in the city.... i didnt see gorgeous ones like i use to see in Europe but this was really nice and could be whatever apart a chatedral.... its on the right side of the square looking to 9 de Julio Avenue

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    Plaza de Mayo

    by DPando Updated Apr 20, 2006

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    Nice square above all !! Plaza de Mayo is a really famous place ... i visited for 3 or 4 times because its a link in the city ... i hop off the bus in Colon Square behind it and crossed the sqaure to go to the "subte" or to see Obelisco or Corrientes, Florida street or the City...it gets the Casa rosada surrouned by official buildings and gardens where people take seat or buy sth in typical souvenir improvised stalls ... on the opposite side of Casa Rosada there is a street fork ..to the right you take Roque Pena street that runs to Republica Sq. where there is the famous Obelisco and before it the "subte stop" and turning to right narrow but important city streets crowded of people and bustling and polluted buses running ...streets like Piedras Tacuari.....
    To the left the sights are not so good like others ...you can turn to indepencia on the was to San Telmo neighbourhood....my favourite

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    Central Bank / Banco Central

    by sof76 Updated Feb 17, 2006

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    The Central Bank of Argentina was created in 1935. It is a self-governed body of the National Government, regulated by its Charter and by the Financial Institutions Act.
    it has a Museum inside:
    The Museum has a permanent exhibit showing its major items. Temporary numismatic exhibits are held on different historical, social and political issues.
    The Museum includes a large library open to the public which covers a wide range of general subjects as well as volumes specialising in numismatics, Argentine history and museum-related studies. The library is open Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Its varied material is periodically updated with the addition of national and foreign books, publications, journals, and catalogues.
    Guided visits must be arranged in advance by telephone. School groups and adult visitors are welcome to join in these tours accompanied by guides specialised in the history of Argentine currency. Visits are supplemented with audio-visual aids. Teachers and students are given reference material on the different national currency issues.

    El Banco Central de Argentina fue creado en 1935.
    Existe un museo dentro del Banco Central.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Paying Homage to the Libertador

    by Assenczo Written Oct 3, 2005

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    San Martin's resting place
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    If one has been in Argentina for any length of time, it quickly becomes obvious that one person has left his stamp on this country more than anybody else - or perhaps the myth of him is useful from statehood point of view. In Russia during Soviet times it was Lenin, in Cuba it is Che, Mao still dominates the Tiananmen Square and Abu Bourguiba is omnipresent in Tunisia. The Argentinean equivalent is San Martin. The previous comparisons do not fit the pattern completely though. Imagine Trotsky being revered as San Martin - both were exiled but what a different use of their legacy.
    Anyway, the chapel with the grave of the Libertador is in the Metropolitan Cathedral, in a very Napoleonic style housed by Greek-looking (pagan) temple.

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    THE CABILDO

    by RafaelTheSecond Written Sep 23, 2005

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    Old heritage in town, the Cabildo by RTL

    Right in the microcentro of the city you can find a very important landmark...a goverment house that witnessed the countryºs independence from Spain in 1810. It was constructed in 1764, and it was bigger than it is now, part of the building was cut to create Bolivar and Mayo Street.

    The Mayo street starts at the Argentinean Congress and ends at Mayo Square.

    It is important to go to Cabildo because you can understand more about the brave history of the country, inside the Cabildo there is a lovely art crafts square!

    Sep 15th, 2005

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    CASA ROSADA

    by RafaelTheSecond Written Sep 23, 2005

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    A sunny cold end of winter at Plaza de Maio

    Yes it is Pink...But everything started in 1580, when Don Juan de Garay ordered the constrution of a fortress, and they called it "Castillo de San Miguel", then in 1596, Zarate increased and enlarge the walls of the castle...But finally, thanks to Mitre, many years later, the building became the House of the Goverment, after that Sarmiento, in 1873 definitevely settled in the Palace.

    It is located in front of the famous Plaza de Mayo where once in a while the mothers of missed politicians go there to force the goverment to give them at least some clue about the bodies of their missed sons.

    If you go to the corner of Balcarce y Rivadavia you will find the Palace, it is also closed to the first HOUSE OF GOVERMENT, THE CABILDO, AND next to the city's Cathedral.

    A very cool person works there, Mr. Nestor Carlos Kirchner, born in the south of Argentina, in a very cold province called Rio Gallegos, some bad argentineans says that he never looks in the eye!!! HEHEHEH

    But at least he is trying his best to save Argentina from a very deep economic hole, and slowly the country is getting recovered. Argentina deserves that!

    And this is me with the Casa Rosada behind me! :)

    Sep 13th, 2005

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  • Cabildo

    by MDC6 Updated Jun 1, 2005

    The Cabildo is the city's original seat of government, while the region was still a part of Spain's empire in America. It's a very good example of colonial architecture. The building has been modified, however; one side of it was demolished in order to make way for the construction of Avenida de Mayo. There's also a museum here... I didn't go, but I've heard that it's worth checking out.

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Comments (1)

  • kokobrazil's Profile Photo
    Mar 31, 2013 at 9:14 AM

    hello i just came from visiting Argentina Chile and Easter island march 2013 . i loved Argentina its very romantic city ,i hoped to fall in love with an Argentinian girl but i was un lucky ,you see iam romantic and i ven danced the tango ,i hope to come by again to Argentina and dance the tango and drink wine from argentina and dance a tango with with a nice Argentinian girl and talk to her in my broken Spanish and look into her eye and say wow i am a luckiest guy]
    cheers
    kokobrazil

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