Plaza de Mayo: Casa de Gobierno Casa Rosada, Buenos Aires

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  • Plaza de Mayo: Casa de Gobierno Casa Rosada
    by cfuentesm
  • Plaza de Mayo: Casa de Gobierno Casa Rosada
    by draguza
  • Casa Rosada-Buenos Aires
    Casa Rosada-Buenos Aires
    by GentleSpirit
  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Casa Rosada

    by xaver Written Apr 28, 2013

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    casa rosada

    The casa rosada (rose house) is the headquarter of the Argentinian government and, at the same time, it is a national monument. It has been built in 1594, its name derives from the particular color and it also hosts the Museo de la Casa del Gobierno a collection of objects, paintings and sculptures reguarding the history of the contry and its presidents.

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    Casa Rosada, the Pink House of Buenos Aires

    by jumpingnorman Updated Mar 22, 2013

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    The first time I saw this pink building, there was some kind of bike race and the roads were closed off and people were walking everywhere. The Argentinians do have a love of sport and enjoy weekend physical activities.
    Casa Rosada is the presidential palace, equivalent of the USA’s White House, and also known as the Pink House. Some say that the color is as such because bovine blood was used in the 19th century to paint palaces? Hmmm…or maybe it was the color resulting from an attempt of President Sarmiento (1868-74) to blend the Federalists' "red color" and the Unitarists' "white color" for peace...(red + white = pink)

    But the actual current president’s residence (as of 2006) is not here but at the calm suburbs of Olivos, north of the center.

    It’s from the balconies of this Pink Palace (at the side that faces Plaza de Mayo) that Evita gave her famous speeches, including those of Madonna for her movie named after the famous first lady of Argentina.

    I made a video of my short trip to Buenos Aires on Youtube. Hope you like this:

    JUMPING NORMAN IN BUENOS AIRES

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    La Casa Rosada

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 8, 2013

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    Casa Rosada-Buenos Aires

    Unlike our White House, the President of Argentina does NOT live here. This is the seat of the executive, so the president has her offices here. The building itself is famous as it has the balcony where Eva Peron used to address the crowds (the descamisados- those without shirts)

    The Casa Rosada stands on the site of the former Buenos Aires fort, which not only served as the seat of power but also controlled access to the city. The fort was gradually replaced over the years and the present Casa Rosada dates from the 19th century, when Argentina's wealth allowed for the hiring of numerous Italian and French architects who transformed the look of the city.

    At the time of my visit the Casa Rosada was undergoing substantial renovation, so the pictures weren't great.

    Near the subte (subway) entrance there is a small Presidential Museum which displays items of several of Argentina's Presidents. Though mildly interesting, I would recommend this small museum only for those who have a strong interest in the Argentine presidency.

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    CASA ROSADA (Monserrat)

    by draguza Updated Nov 30, 2012

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    Monserrat in central Buenos Aires is considered the oldest neighborhood in the area, being able to date its origins back to the 16th century. Basically the business end of BA, this is where the President lives, in the unique pink government building known as the Casa Rosada. This part of the city also contains many of the older and more important buildings, such as the City Hall and the Colegio Nacional de Buenos Aires.

    Unsurprisingly in an area noted for its architecture, Monserrat is also home to an area known as the Illuminated Block, which dates back to the 17th century and bristles with religious and political importance. The main square, Plaza de Mayo, is also steeped in political history and is surrounded by imperious-looking buildings such as the Casa Rosada and the national bank.

    Café Tortoni is one of the must-visit places in Monserrat. This practically ancient establishment dates back to 1858 and has been frequented by such luminaries as Albert Einstein, Jorge Luis Borges, and Robert Duvall. Find this rather anachronistic but atmospheric treasure at 825 Avenida de Mayo.

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  • mircaskirca's Profile Photo

    Palacio Presidencial

    by mircaskirca Updated Sep 7, 2011

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    Casa Rosada
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    Perhaps the most photographed building in Buenos Aires Casa Rosada or Pink House is the main presence on Plaza de Mayo. Officially known as Casa de Gobierno (Government House) or Palacio Presidencial (Presidential Palace), it's BA's equivalent to the USA's White House. It is home to the presidential offices; the grand residence of the president is in Olivos. The building dates back to President Sarmento's time. Its construction began in 1873 on the site of a fort - the ruins of which can be seen from inside the Casa Rosada itself and the Plaza de Mayo.

    The historical balcony, which faces the Plaza, is from 1900 and for the Argentinians represents more than a simple balcony. It is the symbol of the institutional power and witness of the most important events, famous due to the speeches of President Juan Peron and his wife Eva Peron. Former President Carlos Menem allowed Madonna to use it for the 1996 film Evita, to the surprise of many Porteños. This is where Madonna sang her filmed interpretation of the song 'Don't Cry for Me, Argentina'.

    Visits are via the south side entrance, which also leads to the Museo de la Casa Rosada (on Hipolito Yrigoyen 219) which is open Mon-Fri 10am-6pm, Sun 2-6pm. The tours are free but must be reserved in advance.

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Pink House

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you come to Buenos AIres you have to see the Casa Roasado or pink house. This is Argentina's version of the "White House". The president works here.

    The history of the buildings color has many stories. One is that it was painted with cow's blood and dried pink. I don't know if it's true but it does make an interesting tale.

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  • solcitom87's Profile Photo

    the pink house!

    by solcitom87 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    casa rosada

    La Casa Rosada (Spanish for "the Pink House"), officially known as the Casa de Gobierno ("Government House") or Palacio Presidencial ("The Presidential Palace"), is the official seat of the executive branch of the government of Argentina.

    The Casa Rosada was built at the eastern end of the Plaza de Mayo.

    The current building, however, dates back only to 1873 and was constructed over the foundations of an earlier customs house, post office, and fortress.

    Its balcony, which faces the square, has served as a podium for many figures, including Eva Perón, and Pope John Paul II, who visited Buenos Aires in 1998. Madonna sang her filmed rendition of the song "Don't Cry for Me, Argentina," for the movie Evita, from the balcony after a meeting with the then President Carlos Menem.

    The building is painted a light pink colour. Dubbed "Casa Rosada" by President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, it is said that he chose this colour scheme in order to defuse political tensions by mixing the red and white colours of the country's opposing political parties. An alternative explanation suggests that the original paint contained cow's blood to prevent damage from the effects of humidity.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    -A pink house!

    by mindcrime Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Casa Rosada

    Ok, I already knew about it but for some strange reason I started to laugh when I saw it! It was the first building I checked when the taxi dropped me there at Plaza de Mayo. In fact the part you see from plaza de mayo is the back side of the building!

    Anyway, I could imagine Evita waving to the masses from the balcony while thousands of locals screaming down in the square. In our days it’s the Governments House officially but the president uses only the offices of the building but he doesn’t live here so when he’s not at work cant hear clearly what the people claim for!:).

    The building was built in 1873 and there are many theories about the pink color of its walls, most of them talk about peace among Federalists and Unitarists, the opposing political parties at the end of the 19th century. The other theory says that they used cow’s blood because those days it was common to use it for protection against humidity!!

    There are free guided tours in spanish from Monday to Friday at 16:00 You can also visit for free the museum for free (Monday to Friday 10:00-18:00)

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  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    Center of Buenos Aires

    by TexasDave Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    The President's 'House' the Casa Rodada, and Plaza de Mayo in back of it could be termed the center point of Buenos Aires, not geographically, but in practical terms. All of the Subte underground train lines start close to here and many of the large tourist sites are close by.

    This has also been the scene of many important political events, including the public speeches given by Eva Peron and the demonstrations by mothers of the 'desaparecidos' during the dirty war.

    Try to be in the neighborhood at the top of the uneven hours of the clock starting at 9:00 and you'll see the changing of the Presidential Guards- nowhere near as impressive as at Buckingham Palace but sill neat to watch.

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    The famous balcony

    by PierreZA Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Casa Rosada

    This must be one of the most recognizable buildings in Argentina. The Casa De Gobierno (Governors House) is located in the east end of the Plaza de Mayo.
    It is a remarkable building with the famous balcony where Juan Peron gave his speeches and his wife, Evita Peron made her appearances.

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  • sof76's Profile Photo

    Casa de Gobierno "Casa Rosada" / Goverment House

    by sof76 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Casa Rosada

    In 1580, Juan de Garay assigned this place for the construction of Buenos Aires Fort. This building has been the seat of the National Government since the Primera junta (the first council) in 1810. It was painted pink after the decition of President Sarmiento in 1873, who chose that color since it represented the union of both political sectors (red was the color of federals, headed by Juan Manuel de Rosas, white was the color of the opposition: the unitarians).

    En 1580, Juan de Garay asigno este lugar para la construccion del fuerte de Buenos Aires. Este edificio fue el asiento del Gobierno Nacional desde la Primera Junta en 1810. Fue pintado rosa por desicion del presidente Sarmiento en 1873, ya que el rosa representaba la union de los colores de los dos diferentes sectores politicos: Rojo era el color de los federales dirigidos por Juan Manuel de Rosas y blanco era el de los unitarios.

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Casa Rosada

    by vtveen Updated Oct 27, 2010

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    Casa Rosada

    One of the most remarkable buildings with its (very) pink walls around the Plaza de Mayo is Casa Rosada (Pink House) on the east side of the square.

    It is and has always been from 1810 till nowadays, the presidential palace. Specially the balcony is famous because Juan and Evita Peron (and others) used it for their patriotic speeches to the gathered 'portenos' on the plaza.

    It was President Sarmientos who decided to paint the palace pink. There is a theory which tells the pink colour is a mixture of red and white, the colours of the two factions in Argentina during that time. The other story is that the paint was mixed with cow blood to make the walls waterproof.
    Casa Rosada, with a small museum, is open for visitors (more information museo@presidencia.net.ar).

    In front of the palace on the Plaza de Mayo is a statue of General Belgrano, one of the leaders of the Argentine Declaration of Independence.

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  • zweiblumen's Profile Photo

    The Pink House

    by zweiblumen Updated Mar 14, 2008

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    Casa Rosada
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    Casa Rosada is the home of the presidential offices in Buenos Aires and also contains a free to enter museum. The building dates back to 1873 and its colour reputedly derives from the decision of President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento to have the building painted in a combination of the colours of the two opposing political parties red & white .. hence the pink.

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  • iam1wthee's Profile Photo

    Casa Rosada

    by iam1wthee Written Mar 31, 2004

    otherwise known as the government house. They let you inside before 4pm normally but on March 25th 2004 there was barricades surrounding it in preparation for the festivities. The government is changing over now to be more democratic.

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  • goshawk301's Profile Photo

    Plaza de Mayo

    by goshawk301 Written Feb 3, 2004
    The Plaza and the Presidential Palace

    This is where it all started, that silent, dignified but relentless demand for justice. A fierce determination to preserve the memory of those who were destroyed.
    The Plaza is one of the seminal places where history was made in the late twentieth century - a history of struggle for human dignity, rights and justice.

    The day we visited Plaza de Mayo was a chilly Monday late in the afternoon. The Mothers of the Square were not there, but the pathway of their marching was marked with a sign of white scarf on the pavement. The Pink Palace of the President looked oddly benign; I hope that would indeed the case for the country from now on.

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