San Telmo, Buenos Aires

4.5 out of 5 stars 83 Reviews

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    Modern Art Museum

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Remade from an old Tobacco and storehouse at the museum has many different exhibition halls. It was one of the few museums I checked out, though or only briefly. When I go back for my next trip, it's at the top of my list. While were not talking about the MOMO, or someplace like that, you'll find a very strong collection of contemporary Argentinean paintings and also quite frequently it boasts electronic music events and video technology displays.

    Open 8am to noon and 4pm to 8pm daily. Admission $1 and under 12yo are admitted free. Guided tours in Spanish are also available.

    Modern Art museum
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    San Telmo

    by Dabs Updated Apr 22, 2006

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    We visited the San Telmo neighborhood, Buenos Aires' oldest, on our tour with a Cicerone, Veronica, a local from Buenos Aires. At one time this area was home to the wealthy of Buenos Aires but a yellow fever epidemic in the 1870s drove the rich folks north and the poor immigrants moved in and the mansions were converted to tenements (conventillos).

    San Telmo is being gentrified and is now home to terrific restaurants, loads of antique shops along Calle Defensa and old mansions that you can just imagine the glory of when the rich folks lived there.

    If we had been there on Sunday, we would have saved San Telmo for then as the Plaza Dorrego turns into the San Telmo Antiques Fair on Sunday between 10-5. During the rest of the week you can instead visit the San Telmo Market at 961 Defensa at Bolivar or shop in the antique shops along Defensa.

    We ate lunch at La Brigada, the other place we were considering was Desnivel at Defensa 858 at Indepedencia that was recommended to us by some foodies.

    San Telmo Market Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo San Telmo San Telmo San Telmo

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    Casa de la Cultura

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Ahhh...no city would be complete without a house of culture. And this one is a beauty. Currently housing the editorial offices of Le Prensa newspaper, it's an example of French academic style combined with Portena architecture. It was rather unique at the time, being that the Prensa was considered one of the most important newspapers in the world. It was built with a team of French, Swiss and U.S. firms and its facades are the only example of Garnier style in the country; Garnier being the architect of the Paris Opera and Monte Carlo Casino.

    This is also home to the La Prensa siren, which sounds to mark important world events. The first time being when Italian King Umberto 1 died, and again when Democracy returned to Argentina in 1983. Guided tours are available on weekends from 1pm to 5pm.

    Culture House
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    Case De Liniers

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Between 1806 and 1809, Santiago de Liniers, the next to the last Viceroy of the Rio de Plata lived here. In his hall (living room???) the British General Beresford agreed to the terms of surrender after the 1806 invasion. It's located on a quiet little street and in all seriousness some pretty important shenanigans took place here. Liniers copped the pad from his in-laws.

    doorway, interesting, huh?
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    Centro National de Musical

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    This building was first designed to house the National Lottery, and was originally designed by the Italian architect Carlos Morra. The building then went through a second remodeling and was finally inaugurated in its current form in 1997.

    The building was prepared to house musical institutions depending on the "National Secretary of Culture" to be part of the National Center for music, including rehearsal studios and a specialized library, according to the Clarin.

    This building is not open to the public during the week, but on the weekends is by special application only.

    National Center of Music
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    San Telmo - An old charmed neighborhood

    by Constanza Written Apr 30, 2004

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    San Telmo -at some time the center of the city- proves that Buenos Aires has existed for more than four centuries.

    You can infer that because of the different old buildings protected as historical heritage.

    Here you can find most of the tanguer?as.
    In Plaza Dorrego and surroundings you can feel that tango atmosphere reproduced by the bandone?n rhythm.

    Artisans and antique stands gather here, and tango dancers usually perform their shows in the open air.

    Since San Telmo has been declared historical area it has developed from the point of view of buildings and stores. Many last century old houses have been recycled into stores and picturesque restaurants.

    San Telmo��s Feria

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    Where is the charm?

    by xaver Written Apr 28, 2013

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    San Temo is the oldest area of the city, an area where which was above all home of dockworkers and brickmakers, it can easily be considered the first industrial area of the city. For years it was separated from the city by a ravine, it has been officially incorporated only in 1708.
    It was described to me like the most characteristic part of the town, but I must admit I didn’t enjoy at all. I went in a normal day, not on week end so there were no musicians on the roads, no tango dancers, nor any market, it appeared pretty desolated.

    San Telmo
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    Casa de Moneda

    by Sonador3 Written May 24, 2004

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    This is the "First house for printing money". It was in service from 1881 to 1944 and was originally created in 1875. In the beginning, only peso coins were minted here, but in 1875 they also started printing bills. Engineer Eduardo Castilla -- who was also the first director of the building -- also was the designer. Also on these grounds was the Del Rey Hospital, founded by Juan de Garay between 1611 and 1613. Currently the Belgraniano Institute and the Historical Institute of Studies of the Army hold temporary exhibitions here.

    Exhibition hours: Tuesday through Sundays from 2pm to 6pm

    First Money House
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    San Telmo: tango, music, shopping, and, and...

    by ellielou Written Dec 22, 2005

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    While San Telmo on the weekends is a big tourist destination, it's definitely worth getting to this lively area when it's weekly "feria" is going strong. During the week, there are still tourists, but it is quieter.

    The market is really something. Street performers compete for your attention, tango dancers, tango singers, people selling everything from old seltzer bottles to new (I hope) bras.

    In addition to the market, antique stores abound, as do restaurants and bars. A fine place to spend a better part of a day or an evening. And, this is the area where tango was "invented." It's really not to be missed.

    singing for his supper agua con gas, por favor wig in a box (and other things too....) tango god happily tangoing
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    Bohemian-chic

    by mircaskirca Updated May 4, 2008

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    San Telmo is one of the oldest city's neighbourhoods. You can see it from the faded elegance that this area was once one of the most wealthy parts of Buenos Aires. The yellow fever epidemic at the end of the 19th century caused many to die and many others to move to parts north of the city what is now Recoleta. This left San Telmo with empty mansions that soon became home to the struggling Italian and Spanish immigrants, transforming the district into mosaic of diversity and culture. Today San Telmo has been beautifully restored, fusing the old with the new, and making it a microcosm of true porteño culture.

    The labyrinth of cobblestone streets, containing traditional local cafes, book shops, antique shops and art galleries all lead to Plaza Dorrego, the oldest square in Buenos Aires which becomes an outdoor antiques market on Sundays. Tango music and dance can be enjoyed in this square or at a venue such as El Viejo Almacen, devoted to this melancholy art form. There have been some efforts to regenerate this historic district and the Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires houses experimental artwork in an old tobacco warehouse.

    Due to an inexplicable sense of sensuality, colour and passion, San Telmo with Plaza Dorrego can be easily called the 'Paris of South America'.

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    Bohemian site

    by gueto Written Jan 31, 2004

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    San Telmo is by far the most bohemian neighbourhood of Buenos Aires.
    Tango dancers, craftmen and artists gather there every Saturday and specially Sunday to expose their imagination and creativity.
    San Telmos is as well a nice center of antique shops where you can get real expensive pieces of art.
    In the heart of the neighbourhood you have Plaza Dorrego(a square) where people sit and drink Argentina's local beer (Quilmes) and enjoy the fresh air.
    I advise you to walk Defensa st. all the way and enter in this old house ( in the picture) which is an art and shop gallery.
    San Telmo is good as well to see old historical bars which names can be found in tango songs. And talking about tango, these are some addresses to go a see tango dancers:
    El Viejo Almacén: Av. Independencia and Balcarce.Tel. 4308-7388.
    Tangódromo: Defensa 535.Tel. 4342-6610
    Academia Nacional del Tango: Av. de Mayo 833 1º 3. Tel. 4345-6967.

    patio of old house
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    SAN TELMO ... An old charming neighborhood...

    by luzmaria Updated Mar 7, 2004

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    Its the oldest neighbourhood. Long ago it used to be an aristocratic place area but now it s the place for artists and bohemians to be at ease. During the turn of the century residents fled from this barrio after outbreaks of yellow fever and malaria.

    Today it is a thriving neighborhood. By day -on weekends - San Telmo is home to the Sunday flea market and outdoor Tango shows. There are a lot of antique shops, "fileteado" shops (as in the picture) and of course, the famous "tanguerias" (places to go and dance tango). By night there are many fashionable nightclubs...

    I suggest you go there on Sundays, from about 10 a.m. till about 5 p.m., when "Plaza Dorrego" becomes a fair where people sell antiques and there are tango singers and dancers.

    San Telmo, fileteado, Buenos Aires

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    Farmacia Estrella

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Yeah, I know...a pharmacy. What are you gonna do? I thought it was a pretty cool little shop with an olde time sign and an interior that takes you back a hundred years to the early 1900's, with walnut wood shelves and ceiling paintings symbolizing "health, pharmacopoeia and illness". Well, ok then.

    Pharmacie
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    Look up

    by andal13 Written Dec 3, 2003

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    San Telmo has a beautiful architecture, and every little detail is charming; pay attention to the ornaments, even the billboards of restaurants and pubs.

    San Telmo tiene una hermosa arquitectura, y cada pequeño detalle es encantador; presten atención a las ornamentaciones, incluso los carteles de restaurantes y pubs.

    Billboard

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    Pasaje La Defensa

    by andal13 Updated Dec 3, 2003

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    An ancient building recreates the 19th century atmosphere; inside, there are black and white floors, iron balconies, wells and several antiques shops.

    Un antiguo edificio recrea la atmósfera del siglo XIX; dentro, hay pisos en blanco y negro, balcones de hierro, aljibes y tiendas de antigüedades.

    Pasaje La Defensa

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