San Telmo, Buenos Aires

4.5 out of 5 stars 136 Reviews

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  • San Telmo
    by cfuentesm
  • San Telmo, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    San Telmo, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    by cadiana88
  • SAN TELMO
    SAN TELMO
    by draguza
  • MeZuGa's Profile Photo

    Feria de ropa Usada

    by MeZuGa Updated Aug 29, 2004

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    Ropa usada

    A 2 cuadras de la Plaza Dorrego los fines de semana Se arma una feria de ropa usada y accesorios, en el cual se pueden encontrar cosas interesantes.

    The 2 blocks of Dorrego Square, at the weekends feature a used clothes and
    accessory fair, at which you can find many interesting things. It is like one
    giant yard sale.

    .

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    San Telmo

    by Dabs Updated Apr 22, 2006

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    San Telmo Market
    4 more images

    We visited the San Telmo neighborhood, Buenos Aires' oldest, on our tour with a Cicerone, Veronica, a local from Buenos Aires. At one time this area was home to the wealthy of Buenos Aires but a yellow fever epidemic in the 1870s drove the rich folks north and the poor immigrants moved in and the mansions were converted to tenements (conventillos).

    San Telmo is being gentrified and is now home to terrific restaurants, loads of antique shops along Calle Defensa and old mansions that you can just imagine the glory of when the rich folks lived there.

    If we had been there on Sunday, we would have saved San Telmo for then as the Plaza Dorrego turns into the San Telmo Antiques Fair on Sunday between 10-5. During the rest of the week you can instead visit the San Telmo Market at 961 Defensa at Bolivar or shop in the antique shops along Defensa.

    We ate lunch at La Brigada, the other place we were considering was Desnivel at Defensa 858 at Indepedencia that was recommended to us by some foodies.

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    Open Air Market

    by fachd Updated Sep 19, 2007

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    One of the many buskers performing his talent
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    On Sunday we decided to go to San Telmo flea market. When we arrived they were large crowd at the market. We started to stroll along the cobblestone street and absorbing the atmosphere. The area is full with vendors selling art and handicrafts, stall selling copperware and brassware, interesting souvernier shops. They are clown with stilt, big band playing tango music, tango dancer doing intricate steps, buskers trying to get your attention, musician selling original CD. Local artist selling paintings. All the activities are happening at the market open areas. They are tourist having lunch at many of the sidewalk café, restaurants and bars. They are antique shops at Plaza Dorrego. It is a perfect place to shop.

    San Telmo Sunday Flea Market certainly is quite festive, vibrant, colourful with carnival atmosphere. It is a place you must visit when you are in Buenos Aires.

    The surrounding area has interesting old buildings. Once upon a time San Telmo was district for wealthy people, so I was told.

    Make sure if you are entertain by the busker's throw in 2 to 5 pesos to the empty hats. In my opinion the buskers makes the San Telmo Flea Market much more interesting.

    Oh yeah be aware of clever pickpockets.

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    Old San Telmo

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Aug 7, 2007

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    One of Two Convent Towers & Magnolia Trees

    When we again returned to Buenos Aires, after spending the previous 8-days split between Iguazu Falls and the Andes Mountains near Mendoza, we spent our last time in the City properly exploring the historic San Telmo district! This district is one of the oldest in the city and originally housed the elite, until an outbreak of Yellow Fever in 1871 drove them further afield to Palermo. However, the narrow streets and interesting houses of this 'protected' area are well worth a stroll.

    After finishing a great pub meal in nearby Plaza Dorrego, we came upon the mid-1700s Baroque-style Jesuit convent Iglesia Nuestra Senora de Belen. Part of the old convent was later turned into a prison for women, which has since become the Museo Penitenciario Nacional.

    Because the steets are so narrow here, and with the old Magnolia trees in full foliage, I could only manage to capture one of the two identical steeples in my shot! The prison museum is attached to the right of this view of the convent.

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    Bares en San Telmo

    by MeZuGa Updated Aug 29, 2004

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    Bares en San Telmo

    En todo el barrio de San Telmo se pueden encontrar bares de comidas autoctonas del pais como extranjeras, muchos de ellos bordean la plaza Dorrego pero tambien hay muchos en los alrededores.

    Throughout San Telmo, there are many small, local ethnic food bars. Many of them
    skirt the Plaza Dorrego but there are also many in the surrounds.

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    Plazoleta San Francisco

    by Sonador3 Written May 24, 2004

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    San Francisco Plaza

    This is a cool little plaza across the street from the Basilica De San Francisco and I found it quite interesting. There you find some very talented artists doing their thing and selling their finished products, and well as some marble statues.

    The plaza was originally created to extend the atrium and give the parishioners a place to gather after mass. The marble statues representing astronomy, industry, geography and navigation were placed there in 1972.

    On Fridays there is an arts and crafts market from noon to 5pm.

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    Pasaje de la Defense

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Pasaje de Defensa

    I really loved this place. Though some may consider it contrived and touristy, I liked the kitschy-ness of the whole thing. Lots of old shops and a cafe or two. Prior to 1981 there were 31 houses here, then it was turned into a shopping promenade. Back in the day (1881) the building belonged to the Ezeiza family (think Airport), and if ever there was a photo that screamed for a sepia setting, it's this one.

    Open Tuesday through Sunday from10am to 8pm.

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    El Viejo Almacen

    by Sonador3 Updated May 24, 2004

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    El viejo Almacen

    This is one the most famous old Tango house in the city, and has been presenting shows since 1968. And until his death, the famous singer Edmundo Rivero managed the establishment. He named it after the Sentimiento gaucho tango lyrics composed by Francisco and Rafael Canaro in 1924. The building dates back to the beginning of the 20th century and was restored in 1979, later becoming a grocery store, a winery and the Volga restaurant.

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    Modern Art Museum

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Modern Art museum

    Remade from an old Tobacco and storehouse at the museum has many different exhibition halls. It was one of the few museums I checked out, though or only briefly. When I go back for my next trip, it's at the top of my list. While were not talking about the MOMO, or someplace like that, you'll find a very strong collection of contemporary Argentinean paintings and also quite frequently it boasts electronic music events and video technology displays.

    Open 8am to noon and 4pm to 8pm daily. Admission $1 and under 12yo are admitted free. Guided tours in Spanish are also available.

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    San Telmo Antiques Fair with Tango on Street

    by jumpingnorman Written Oct 28, 2008

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    Street going into San Telmo, Buenos Aires

    Feria de San Telmo

    I arrived on a Sunday morning in Buenos Aires and that was perfect! There is Sunday shopping for antiques in San Telmo’s Plaza Dorrego, the heart of Tangoland.
    I took a taxi close to the site and walked the rest of the way and was surprised to find a lot of people in the Plaza. There were tango dancers and some mimes and musicians, and this scenario was very far from how San Telmo used to be in the 1800’s when streetfightings were rampant due to the rebellious portenos fighting the invading British.
    There were also lots of cafes and restaurants along the cobbled streets with colonial buildings, giving the place a European atmosphere with “spice” due to the Tango music.

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    Casa Minima

    by Sonador3 Written May 24, 2004

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    narrow house

    Kind of like Mini-Me, this is Mini-House. The front of the house is only 2.9 meters wide and is known as the narrowest house in the city. The building was built around the end of the 18th century, but the origins are hazy. It is believed that the house was erected on grounds granted to slaves that had been freed by their former masters. In the 20th century, fishermen and merchant seamen occupied the house.

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    Iglesia de San Pedro Telmo

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Church

    The San Pedro Telmo Church is one of the oldest in the city, one of the most beautiful and definitely one of the hardest to photograph. And for lame-o's like me, practically impossible. Built in 1734 by the Jesuits Bianchi, Primoli, Schmidt (sounds like a law firm) and architect Masella, who drew up the plans. The octagonal parts of the towers and the domes were finished in the 19th century and the atrium was restored in the 20th century.

    In the interior, the pulpit -- commissioned in 1805 by Manuel Belgrano -- is remarkable, as are the old 18th century images and oil paintings.

    Open Monday through Saturday from 8:30am to 12 noon and again from 4pm to 7pm. Also Sundays from 1pm to 6pm.

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    Casa de la Cultura

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Culture House

    Ahhh...no city would be complete without a house of culture. And this one is a beauty. Currently housing the editorial offices of Le Prensa newspaper, it's an example of French academic style combined with Portena architecture. It was rather unique at the time, being that the Prensa was considered one of the most important newspapers in the world. It was built with a team of French, Swiss and U.S. firms and its facades are the only example of Garnier style in the country; Garnier being the architect of the Paris Opera and Monte Carlo Casino.

    This is also home to the La Prensa siren, which sounds to mark important world events. The first time being when Italian King Umberto 1 died, and again when Democracy returned to Argentina in 1983. Guided tours are available on weekends from 1pm to 5pm.

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    Basilica de San Francisco

    by Sonador3 Updated May 24, 2004

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    Church

    This is really a beautiful old structure. The temple is located on the grounds that Juan de Garay granted to Franciscan priests in 1580 beside the San Roque chapel and convent. Construction started in 1730 and was inaugurated in 1754. In 1807 the facade and towers collapsed and the restoration was commissioned to Uruguayan architect Tomas Toribio. The interior lost part of its beauty when arsonists burned it in 1955. Pricks.

    Open Monday thru Friday from 7am to 1pm and again from 3pm to 7pm.Guided tours are available.

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    Convento de Santo Domingo

    by Sonador3 Updated May 26, 2004

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    Another Church

    Another one of those beautiful churches that I can see every day here at home...not!!! The original construction began in 1751 when the Dominicos order arrived in the city. It was designed by Architect Masella, and Juan de Lezica is the one who granted the funds for the project. De Lezica also founded the Villa de Lujan, which is today Lujan City.

    With the exception of some minor modifications over the years, the church maintains it's original look. Sometime after the second British invasion, during Rivadalvias presidency, the Dominicos were exiled, and the church became a national historical museum and observatory.

    Guided tours are available and you can make an appointment on Thursdays from 9am to 3pm. Open to the public weekdays from 9am to 1pm and Sunday from 10am to 12 noon.

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