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Most Viewed Favorites in Argentina

  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Jorge Luis Borges

    by andal13 Written Feb 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Inspired, controversial, the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) is one of the best in Spanish language. He wrote short stories, essays and poetry; some of his works are "Universal history of infamy", "Anthology of fantastic literature" and "Fictions".

    Genial, polémico, el escritor argentino Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) es uno de los mejores en lengua española. Escribió cuentos, ensayo y poesía; algunas de sus obras son "Historia universal de la infamia", "Antología de la literatura fantástica" y "Ficciones".

    Jorge Luis Borges

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    Atahualpa Yupanqui

    by andal13 Updated Feb 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Atahualpa Yupanqui (Héctor Chavero) was a composer, guitar player, singer, writer; he is the most outstanding folklore musician of Argentina. He was born in 1908 and died in 1992.

    Atahualpa Yupanqui (Héctor Chavero) fue compositor, guitarrista, cantante, escritor; es el más destacado folklorista argentino, sin dudas. Nació en 1908 y falleció en 1992.

    Fondest memory: Porque no engraso los ejes
    me llaman abandonao ...
    Si a mí me gusta que suenen,
    ¿pa' qué los quiero engrasaos?
    Es demasiado aburrido
    seguir y seguir la huella,
    demasiao largo el camino
    sin nada que me entretenga.

    No necesito silencio,
    yo no tengo en qué pensar.
    Tenía, pero hace tiempo,
    ahura ya no pienso más.

    Los ejes de mi carreta
    nunca los voy a engrasar ..."

    (Los ejes de mi carreta)

    Atahualpa Yupanqui

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  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Astor Piazzolla

    by andal13 Written Feb 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Astor Piazzolla (1921 - 1992) was born in Mar del Plata (Provinica de Buenos Aires); he spent his childhood in New York, where he began to study piano and bandoneón (large accordion). Back in Argentina in 1937, he started his brilliant career as large accordion player and tango composer. His unusual talent soon started a controversy: "That is not tango!" Nowadays, his stroke of genius is well known, and his masterpieces like "Libertango", "Adiós Nonino", "Balada para un loco", "María de Buenos Aires", and much more, are a pleasure for the spirit.

    Astor Piazzolla (1921 - 1992) nació en Mar del Plata (Provinica de Buenos Aires); pasó su infancia en Nueva York, en donde comenzó a estudiar piano y bandoneón. De vuelta en Argentina en 1937, comenzó su brilante carrera como bandoneonista y compositor de tango. Su talento inusual pronto despertó la polémica: "¡Eso no es tango!" En la actualidad, su genialidad es bien conocida, y sus obras maestras como "Libertango", "Adiós Nonino", "Balada para un loco", "María de Buenos Aires", y muchas más, son un placer para el espíritu.

    Astor Piazzolla

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    Ernesto Sábato

    by andal13 Written Feb 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Ernesto Sábato was born in Rojas, Provincia de Buenos Aires in 1911; he began to study Physical-Mathematics Sciences 1928. In Paris, in 1936 he wrote his first novel "La fuente muda" (The dumb fountain), and in the same city, he got his doctorate in Physics. Back in Argentina, he taught at Buenos Aires University, until a personal conflict between the science and the literature made him leave his scientist career, and embrace his literary vocation. Nowadays he does not write anymore, but he is still one of the most brilliant intellectuals of his country. Some of his works are "Sobre héroes y tumbas" (novel), "Entre la letra y la sangre", "Antes del fin" (essays).

    Ernesto Sábato nació en Rojas, Provincia de Buenos Aires en 1911; comenzó a estudiar Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas en 1928. En París en 1936, escribió su primera novela, "La fuente muda", y en la misma ciudad, obtuvo su doctorado en Física. De regreso en Argentina, enseñó en la Universidad de Buenos Aires, hasta que un conflicto personal entre la ciencia y la literatura lo hizo abandonar su carrera científica y abrazar su vocación literaria. En la actualidad ya no escribe más, pero sigue siendo uno de los intelectuales más brilantes de su país. Algunas de sus obras son "Sobre héroes y tumbas" (novela), "Entre la letra y la sangre", "Antes del fin" (ensayos).

    Ernesto S��bato

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    Exchange rates

    by Porteno Written Oct 13, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: http://www.dolarsi.com/ is a great web site for monitoring the exchange rates. One word of advice many of the cambios lower their rates on the weekend and then raise them again on Monday. One close to me last Saturday posted a 2.82 rate and on Monday it was 2.92. So exchange your money on Thursday or wait until Monday/

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Death

    by Sharrie Updated Mar 21, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It was in S. America... specifically, Punta Arenas & now Buenos Aires that I first "toured" the cemetries...
    Cemetries that are so huge & glamourous rivalling homes of those alive today.
    Made me wonder...
    Made me exclaimed...
    These "people" even in death are still taking up prime real estate space in "this life"!
    Are these truly necessary?

    Everyone has loved ones & family who may no longer be around in our world.
    Yet, they will always be with us whenever we remember our love for them.
    I don't know about most people, but when I die one day, if a friend or family just remembered me & shed a tear for me, that'll be enough.
    No need to "house" me in such a worldly space.
    I want to be free when I die, not locked up!!!
    Imagine having to stay in a human compound for the rest of your "lifetimes"!!!

    Thanks, but No thanks!
    Grand Canyon comes to mind :-))
    May the wind carry me wherever I wish to venture!

    F R E E D O M ! ! !

    Freedom? or Enslaved?
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    WISH BOX

    by parsix Updated Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Mailboxes are often loaded with hopes. One thing I love is to send and receive post. When sending, there is the whole process of selecting, preparing, shipping, and waiting for it to reach it's destination. When you receive it is the rush of opening, unwraping, and the surprise of the unexpected. It is over all personal. An today that is something that has been lost.

    correo

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  • sof76's Profile Photo

    Domestic flights schedule from Buenos Aires to:

    by sof76 Updated Feb 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Domestic flights schedule from Buenos Aires to:
    Puerto Iguazú 1 hr 45 mins
    Posadas 1 hr 30 mins
    San Salvador de Jujuy 2 hrs 10 mins
    San Miguel de Tucumán 1 hr 50 mins
    Salta 2 hrs
    Córdoba 1 hr 15 mins
    Mendoza 1 hr 50 mins
    San Carlos de Bariloche 2 hrs 20 mins
    Trelew 2 hrs
    Mar del Plata 1 hr 10 mins
    Río Gallegos 2 hrs 55 mins
    Ushuaia 3 hrs 20 mins
    El Calafate 3 hrs 15 mins

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Spring

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Oct 21, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Even if you'renot a gardener (or a painter) the colours of Argentina's flowering trees and shrubs in Spring are a delight. From the glowing red of the ceibo (the national tree) or golden shrubby calafate bushes in Patagonia (a variety of berberis - they say if you eat the berry you will come back to Patagonia) there is always something to catch the eye. Golden broom lines the roadsides all around Bariloche - it's not a native and is very invasive but there's no denying its beauty. The native berberis there is a brilliant orange - you'll see it all through the forests.
    The jungles of Iguazu are home to all sorts of strange plants - including aerial-rooted epiphytes that crowd the branches of trees along the walkways.
    It's the jacarandas of Buenos Aires that fill the eye completely though as they cast a glorious purple haze over the city.

    Ceibo - the national tree Calafate Bariloche broom Jungle epiphytes Glorious jacaranda

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  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    Adjusting to Agrentine Time

    by DSwede Updated Jul 8, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In my month or so in Argentina, in all the different places, what I found was that lunches typically start around 1pm with service ending around 4pm. The restaurants are then usually shut (unless you’re in tourist area) until ~9pm. An early dinner is 9pm, but commonly 11pm. Many bars don’t open their doors until midnight, and if you find one that opens before, its guaranteed that you will be the only people there. Discos typically do not really start until 3am and go until the sun rises.

    Please note that the further south you go, the earlier dinner may be served. For example in Ushuaia, dinner was available at 8pm.

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  • city_guy's Profile Photo

    Massive city needs Massive roads

    by city_guy Updated Jan 19, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing:

    This road is called the Carlos Pellegrini (I think) and it had a massive 16-18 lane ONE way traffic. Wow... now that's massive. The biggest road I ever crossed was only about 6-8 lanes so this came as a shocker to me.

    By the time I got half way, we had to stop to let the traffice go... no kidding




    Fondest memory:

    The traffic, the meat, the leather goods.☺

    Look right, left, right, left, right...
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

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  • parsix's Profile Photo

    FOSAS

    by parsix Updated Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Within the grounds, the mausoleums and vaults contain the legacy of Argentina's past.
    This is a very elite place. Not anyone can be buried here. You must be well conected.
    One thing caught my attention, some of the thombes have been looter, vandalized and abandon. This should not be the way your rest ends.

    corners

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  • JohnofAustria's Profile Photo

    Quick Guide

    by JohnofAustria Written Feb 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When I was in Patagonia in March of 2005 I saw a great newspaper called "Traveller's Guru." It was all about Patagonia. The website is travellersguru.com if you'd like a preview. The newspaper's audience is intended to be for backpacker, adventure travellers and anyone looking to save a few pesos. It seemed quick common as I found it in Buenos Aires and almost every bus stop south. It's all in English so it's accessible to many different travellers (I suppose English is the new Latin).

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Don't Cry For Me, Argentina!

    by Sharrie Updated Mar 21, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The first time I ever learn or rather hear the name "Argentina" was when I was very young.
    A song... a very famous Evita.
    For years, I didn't think or have anything to do with Argentina.
    Yet, I've always like the way the name sounded, ARGENTINA, a very feminine, regal & strong name.
    I just like the sound of it...

    I finally made it to Argentina beginning of this year... not to see Argentina but to embark on the most ambitious of my trips, to the last of the 7 continents, the ever-so-mystical Antarctica.

    Having been to just Buenos Aires & Ushuaia, I can't even claimed to have known this country.
    But what I saw, I love.
    What I love, will live.

    So, "don't cry for me, Argentina!".

    Sing! All u have to do is sing out loud!
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Arts and Culture
    • Theater Travel

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    Eternal Sunshine

    by Sharrie Updated Mar 21, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Legend of Evita - Señora María Eva Duarte de Perón : Loved & hated by many; reminded me of our friend here on VT.

    One of the most famous & powerful women from Argentina, if not the most.
    Yet, many had probably not heard of her until the entertainment industry began to write songs & musicals.

    Consequently, we the majority of the world population gravitate towards what words cannot touched with our hearts & souls but what music can easily weaved itself into the very deep recess of our inner beings.

    For an indepth readings of this woman who had shaped this part of the world, please proceed to:
    Maria Eva Duarte de Peron &
    Evita Peron Historical Research Foundation.

    THE 1st Lady
    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Music

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