Humahuaca Things to Do

  • Landscapes of color
    Landscapes of color
    by Ekahau
  • Things to Do
    by GentleSpirit
  • Things to Do
    by GentleSpirit

Most Recent Things to Do in Humahuaca

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    THE PEOPLE IN PHOTO 2

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

    COLORFUL PEOPLE IN THIS COLORFUL VALLEY in this case Maria is one of the Nivaclé people of whom she said she was one of about 20,000 and only a few hundred Nivaclé people live in the Salta Province of Argentina.

    COLORFUL PEOPLE
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    THE PEOPLE Quila

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

    Eva said she was a Qulla and they have lived here for centuries in fact way before the Inca Empire in the 15th century. The Qulla came into contact with Spaniards in 1540. They resisted Spanish invasion for 110 years but ultimately lost. Eva told me about particularly famous rebel leader Ñusta Willaq, who was a female warrior who fought the Spanish in 1780

    evia AGE 14
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    Landscapes of color 3

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

    Welcome to the western far north of Argentina, no far from where the country borders with Chile and Bolivia. This is an area with a high density of natural wonders,this is the world heritage Quebrada de Humahuaca, and some of its many hills and mountains that stand out thanks to their ravishing colors.

    Landscapes of color
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    Landscapes of color 2

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

    It seemed to me day when the Earth create this landscape was a big party day In any case nature joined together all the rock layers of colors imaginable in one place-- amazing achieving what is perhaps the greatest gathering of different pigments in natural stone in the world:

    Landscapes of color Landscapes of color Landscapes of color
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    COLORFUL PEOPLE 3

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

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    You see lots more features of the Calchaquíes Qulla and Omaguacas aboriginal people. fantastic contrast of land colors and formations plus the strong aboriginal roots in the culture of Jujuy. Aymará and Quechua cultures coexist in the area, and ruins of the Incas are conserved.

    COLORFUL PEOPLE
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    COLORFUL PEOPLE

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

    In this village one really see Hispano-America roots in a landscape made of valleys and narrow trails where Indigenous and Spanish cultures really merged.

    Worldwide known due to the imposing Quebrada de Humahuaca, a UNESCO Humanity Heritage whit a heavenly landscape. The Río Grande flowsthougs the hills of Severn colors and the people are equally colorful

    COLORFUL PEOPLE
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    THE VILLAGE of Humahuaca

    by Ekahau Updated Aug 8, 2015

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    I love the small towns and Humahuaca a village of about 12,000 was perfect to walk around in and set in the most amazing colors of the Quebrada de Humahuaca, a long valley in the central Andean Altiplano. Love just walk and meeting the people. Right in the center of the village there is a he Small Square and a church whose tower has a clock that chimes at 12 pm, and the figure of Saint Francisco Solano does the sign of the cross.

    This is a colonial city: its worth walking narrow paved streets with streetlamps and adobe houses. Very cool Humahuaca was one of the most important trade centers of Alto Perú until the end of the XIX Century.

    VILLAGE of Humahuaca VILLAGE
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    Uquia and the Cuzco School paintings

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 27, 2013

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    You drive into the little village of Uquia (population about 300) and you might wonder why you are stopping. After all, this is a tiny place, the whole village seems to be concentrated on one street. Interestingly, this village has two major reasons to come and visit.

    One is its church, San Fransisco de Paula, which houses an important trove of paintings from the Cuzco school. When the Spaniards conquered the Inca Empire in 1534 they gradually started bringing Christianity to the region. Religious artists were sent to Cuzco to teach the natives the European techniques of painting, the first such effort in the Americas. This effort, perhaps intended to create artists who could faithfully copy European works instead resulted in an interesting development that combined native tendencies and tastes with the established European way of painting. One thing that is different is the use of color. The Cuzco school painters included more earth colors as well as bright reds and yellows. Interestingly, these colors you will see everywhere in the Andean region- they are for example the dominant colors in indigenous clothes.

    The church in Uquia has a large collection of 10 paintings of what they call the angeles arquebuceros (Angels with an Arquebus). The arquebus was an early muzzle loaded rifle.
    I was not able to find out why such a small church in such a remote place would have such an important collection. Some have argued that this portrayal of the angels in fact was entirely familiar to the Quechua natives, perhaps serving as a more modern adaptation of their own "warrior angels." Thus, a fascinating mixing of the two cultures, the European and Andean...both artistically, culturally and religiously.

    San Fransisco de Paula, Uquia
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    Heroes of Independence Monument

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 27, 2013

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    Across from the main square of Humahuaca is Santa Barbara Hill. While you will often see statues of the Spanish conquerors or national heroes near the main plazas, this is entirely different.

    This region had an important part to play in the War of Independence. At the time, this was a crossroads, a strategic location on the road to the colony of Alto Peru (what is today Bolivia), which because of its natural resources (silver particularly) was far more important to the Spaniards than was Argentina. The monument shows a native chief, and I have heard different versions of who that might be, with reliefs of the battles that took place. 14 battles were fought in this region.

    Some say that this monument honors the Army of the North, the locals might argue that it honors the important role that the indigenous people played, After all, Humahuaca successfully resisted 11 sieges by royalists.

    Monumento a los heroes de la independencia
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    The blessing of San Fransisco Solano

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 27, 2013

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    Every day at noon in Humahuaca locals and tourists will come to see a local event. At midday the clock tower opens up and out comes the figure of San Fransisco Solano. The mechanism is quite intricate. As the bells are tolling the Saint makes the sign of the cross and goes back into the tower. Actually, the statue doesn't make a crossing motion, he is able to raise each of his hands and the stutue turns a bit, so it appears he is making the sign of the cross.

    The Statue is 1.80 meters tall and was sculpted by Antonio Gargiulo, an Argentine sculptor. Somehow, the clock mechanism controls the whole movement of the statue.

    The statue represents Francisco Solano, a Fransiscan friar (1549-1610), who was later sainted. Among his works in healing the sick, particularly during the plaguesin Europe. In 1589, he came to the New World, evangelizing in what is today Tucuman Province in Argentina. He was reputed to have a facility with languages and was able to learn the native languages quickly, which would be an enormous feat given how different the local languages are from anything he might have been familiar with. It is said that he was able to foretell the large earthquake in Peru in 1618, after his own death. Solano was sainted in 1726,

    If the name sounds familiar, Mission San Fransisco Solano is one of the California Missions.

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    Archaeological site behind Uquia

    by GentleSpirit Written Jun 15, 2013

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    It should probably come as no surprise that there are archeological remains throughout the entire Humahuaca Gorge, the region served an important strategic function long before the Spaniards set foot in these parts.

    Directly behind the village of Uquia you take the dirt road up. You will reach what they call the Quebrada de Coctaca. What this site is known for is the cultivation terraces, common in the Andean-Incaic settlements. The Pucara is in ruins, you are better off seeing the one in Tilcara which is well restored.

    You can now find several guides in Uquia (and Humahuaca and neighboring villages) that now conduct cabalgatas (horse riding) and hikes out to this area. Really they don't market it just as visiting archeological remains as that would draw relatively small interest, instead it is a chance to explore the colorful scenery. If you go, be mindful that this is at about 2800 meters of altitude, if your body has'nt had a chance to get used to the altitude you will not be happy if you try going on a strenous hike.

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    A view on Salta, northern province

    by Luchonda Updated Oct 11, 2006

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    Overview thx to "Moon travel planner"
    Salta la Linda (the beauty) in the north of Argentina
    Ideal location to visit (daytrip) Cafayate in the south (RN49) and Park National Los Cardones.
    Second daytrip : to Humahuaca and it's valley, in the north .
    Also a highlight and more to the south, Parque Nacional Talampaya.
    Alternatives : Humahuaca after a stay in Jujuy, PNT after a stay in La Rioja

    Overview - map from the net
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    Humahuaca - the village

    by Luchonda Updated Oct 10, 2006

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    Humahuaca, a very small town but so reflecting the life of the original inhabitants.
    The central "Plaza" is impressive, the local markets of indian handycrafts typical, a cheap remembrance by a statue to an Indian hero.
    But never let us forget that the spanish invasion in the 16 century graved this civilization, "parked" the locals in a kind of reservation areas, especially in the north of Argentina.
    This is a politic personel statement and efinatly history, forget about this, this is a travel sharing website.

    Locals selling handy craft Memorial to the indians View on the market/mountains Main Street Traditional market sc��ne
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    Painters Valley

    by Luchonda Updated Oct 7, 2006

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    Painters Valley/Palet is a fantastic and impressive valley to see, located somewhere on the
    road RN9 in the Quabrada de Humahuaca.
    Make a stop here, near the cementary of Maimara.
    Next to the panoramic view, school children will give you a small present, not asking for money, but simply giving you their personel adres, so you can write them or send a postcard from your country. They are collecting postcards from all over the world. Don't disappoint them.

    Painters valley Painters valley Painters valley Painters Valley Painters Valley
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    Purmamarca-Town of the Lion

    by Luchonda Written Sep 16, 2006

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    In Quachua language Purmamarca means "town of the lion" and in Aimara language means "town of virginal earth". Pumamarca rises 2275 metres above the sea level and is encircled by the River Purmamarca in the north and by hillocks, forming a canyon, in the south. As it is placed at the base of the Cerro de los Siete Colores the place has a special charm.
    The Cerro de los Siete Colores ("Hill of the Seven Colours") that has sedimentary rocks of different colours -ochre, red, purple- and is placed behind the city in the Canyon of Purmamarca, a canyon that meets the Canyon of Humahuaca.

    Purmamarca-Town of the Lion Purmamarca God and Dali creation - Purmamarca Church in Purmamarca
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Humahuaca Things to Do

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