Fun things to do in Argentina

  • Museo de arte HispanoAmericano
    Museo de arte HispanoAmericano
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Argentina

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    La Catedral -Tango and folklore.

    by TheView Written Dec 2, 2014

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    I will recommend going here any day in the week. During the time I was in Buenos Aires I was here on more occasions and any weekday it had a good turnout of tourist trying out the basic steps in the tango and later the locals showed up to dans. Later in the evening there was different folklore events.

    So bring your dancing shoos and your guts and try …the teachers are very fine and give a good start up on the Tango

    There is a basic selection of foods and drinks if you need that.

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    • Music
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Quebrada de Humahuaca

    by GentleSpirit Written May 25, 2013

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    This is one of the most memorable, colorful and fascinating parts of a trip to the Argentine north. The Quebrada de Humahuaca was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2003.

    What it is is a gorge 190 km long. Here you will see some of the most amazing naturally occuring colors anywhere. If you look at the Paleta del Pintor (the Painter's Palette) in Mainara or the Cerro de Siete Colors (the Hill of Seven Colors) in Purmamarca you will see.

    There are a lot of activities available in this part of the country, but please remember that you are at the foothills of the Andes. You will be at altitude much of the time in the Quebrada, so prepare yourself accordingly.

    The Quebrada de Humahuaca was named a World Heritage site because it has been a crossroads for civilizations since it was originally settled by the indigeous people some 10,000 years ago.

    Pucara (fortress) of Tilcara
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    Yerba Mate

    by GentleSpirit Updated May 10, 2013

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    In pictures of Argentina you will sometimes see a gaucho sipping on a long metal straw from a gourd. What he is doing is drinking yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis,) which is made from the leaves of the tree (similar to holly tree). This is mainly grown in the subtropical humid areas, especially in Misiones Province and the northeast of the country.

    The yerba mate is a cheap substitute for coffee, with a taste and ritual of preparation all its own.

    Does it have caffeine, yes. Does it give you the same lift as the caffeine in coffee, I personally don't think so. You can buy it flavored, mostly in fruit flavors. I personally drink yerba the traditional way, no flavoring. The taste is a bit bitter (depending on the brand) and most people put a bit of sugar on top of it. It doesn't really have an aftertaste that stays in your mouth, by the way.

    By the way, yerba mate is very good for you! Studies indicate positive correlation of drinking yerba mate with some (10% or less) reduction in LDL cholesterol. It is stimulant, but i don't find myself "wired" or have my heart racing after drinking mate.

    Mate is prepared by pouring hot water (NOT boiling) into the gourd, which you have already put the yerba into. You take little sips by sucking on the metal straw (bombilla). If you are in Buenos Aires and see people standing at the bus stops with a thermos under their arm, that is the water for their mate. But you never see people walking down the street drinking it, like someone would be drinking a soft drink, for example.

    Argentines have a ritual for drinking mate. The host will prepare it, and refresh the water. You pass it around and drink. Its a very social ritual. Someone offering you mate is a good thing, take it and savor it!

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    The Andean Northwest

    by GentleSpirit Updated May 4, 2013

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    The main places most tourists will visit in the Andean Northwest are in Salta and Jujuy Provinces.
    Here you will find an amazing diversity of sights.

    Here you can explore a different side of Argentina. This region was once part of the Inca Empire. The people look different. They are less European. Their food and drink is different as well, using more of the Andean staples.

    If you go outside Salta you will go through tiny villages where the old traditions are still very much alive. If you get a chance stay for one of the festivals, they will be memorable for sure.

    For the outdoor enthusiast this is a wonderful region. The landscapes include wonderful colors, deserts, high mountains, canyons. There are some areas that are classified as jungle.
    There are ample opportunities for "andinismo"-hiking and mountaineering. Be careful though, the altitude will affect you!

    You should plan on at least 10 days to 2 weeks for a good tour of this area.
    Salta Province
    Jujuy Province
    Salta-Capital of Salta Province
    Purmamarca in Jujuy Province
    Cachi

    Camino a las Nubes
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    Tour of the city

    by jdpfu Updated Apr 27, 2013

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    On the 1st day, take a paid tour of the city to get your bearings. This will introduce you to the different barrios, where to shop, where the government stuff is, Tango, and Futbal (probably only 1 team since your guide will certainly forget the other 10+ teams exist).

    Seeing the main sites spread around the city was interesting and hearing our attractive guide provide background on each added to the total fun.

    I still remember her ending the story about almost every statue with "and he was a son of a *** too." I left thinking that Argentine was ruled by "sons of ***es" more as a rule than an exception. As usual, politics in foreign countries are seldom simple to understand, Argentinia isn't any different, so a "is that so" or "I don't understand the topic well enough to comment" is probably the best answer.

    If you have strong feelings about soccer teams, it might be best to keep those to yourself in Argentina too. They take soccer very serious there, much more than I take any sport serious, so I simply do not understand the deep feelings at all. Best to leave any "colors" for local teams at home.

    Santo Domingo?s church with English cannon balls The Women's Bridge Central Bank The Pink House - President's home
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    MY TOP THINGS TO DO IN BUENOS AIRES

    by jumpingnorman Updated Mar 22, 2013

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    Lots of stuff to do in Buenos Aires. I liked modern and cosmopolitan Puerto Madero where they have a very nice bridge that some say looks like it's dancing the Tango...and talking about Tango, yes you do have to see a Tango show. And then they do have an outdoor crafts market/fair at San Telmo on Sundays, and also enjoy walking around palermo Park where you will see the skill of dog walkers walking ten dogs! But watch your steps - poop on the road. Then of course, go see Evita - her grave which is surprisingly small but outshining the bigger ones because of her celebrity status - her grave is at Recoleta Cemetery.

    Also see the Obelisko which is near the Plaza Mayor where they have demonstrations on Fridays/weekends. I witnessed one and it was interesting and I saw someone throw a bottle at a bank - but not trying to hit people, just the bank. And while you're at that area, walk over to the PINK HOUSE which is the equivalent of the White House of the USA. It was where Evita gave her famous speech as she looked at the masses.

    Then visit El Caminito/La Boca - see the nice coloured houses which have a very rich hisotyr and I think this is claso close to the big football stadium (but just be careful walking around since there have been reports of tourists being mugged in the area. And if you have time, go to El Tigre which is I think about an hour from Buenos Aires - but you can ride a ncie canal boat tour there and it is very picturesque (and don't forget your camera - I did and so I have no pics of the place!) But I just took the taxi to El Tigre and it took an hour I think adn maybe just $50 if I remember right (2007).

    And of course there is this wonderful ecological reserve that I found near the city center - Ecologica Reserva Costanera Sur.There’s about 200+ bird species in this beautiful lush marshy land that has become a popular site for weekend outings and hikes. It was during the weekday when I was walking, but during the weekends and holidays, you can rent a bike.

    You might even go far and see Iguazu Falls, but that depends on your time and cash left...

    Enjoy Buenos Aires!

    I made a video of my short trip to Buenos Aires on Youtube. Hope you like this:

    JUMPING NORMAN IN BUENOS AIRES

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    Bariloche

    by GentleSpirit Written Mar 21, 2013

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    Bariloche is the main city in Patagonia. It is famous for many things, more than anything else its spectacular location in what is known as the Lake Region. Bariloche is on the Nahuel Huapi lake at the foothills of the Andes.

    For sports enthusiasts it is known as the center for winter sports. Cerro Catedral is the biggest ski center in South America. There are a multitude of outdoor activities ranging from hang gliding to skiing to hiking to rafting etc. There is also some of the best fishing in South America nearby.

    Bariloche is crowded with tourists, particularly if you arrive during Argentine school holidays.
    You will absolutely want to see the many miradores around the city. Cerro Campanario is a particularly good one if you want to see the Llao Llao Peninsula, it will take your breath away!

    This is more of an active destination. The scenery around here is magnificent!

    View from Cerro campanario
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    visit Buenos Aires

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 21, 2013

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    Your point of arrival in Argentina will most likely be Buenos Aires for most people. Even on the tightest of itineraries, give yourself at least 3 days to enjoy this wonderful city

    Many people will compare Buenos Aires to Paris, and though it does have some architectural similarities, its like comparing apples and oranges. Anyone who has been to Italy will immediately recognize the rhythm that porteños speak with, it sounds more Italian than Spanish.

    Argentines know how to celebrate life, join them! There are lots of great restaurants in this city. The specialty is usually beef, but with all the nationalities that emigrated to Argentina you will find just about anything you want if you do some looking. If you like to dance you will have to first get a good look at the tango, both the professionals that dance at shows as well as the common people that dance just for fun.

    It is a modern, vibrant city. You will want to look around the neighborhoods, enjoy the plentiful green spaces and parks. There are some good museums, and a world class opera and theater scene.

    It's not hard to have a good time in Buenos Aires, it is a lively city with a lot to do. There are plenty of attractions nearby if you want to escape the big city. You can visit the estancias in Buenos Aires Province (San Antonio de Areco is one place). you can go across to Colonia in Uruguay or the Delta.

    Please visit my Buenos Aires pages by clicking on the link.

    Caminito Bosques de Palermo with jacaranda in bloom
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    Visit an Estancia

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 20, 2013

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    A somewhat touristy, though very fun, excursion is going out to one of the estancias near Buenos Aires. (San Antonio de Areco is a favorite) Usually, you will get so see at least part of the working ranch, some of the history of the estancia and its owners. You will be treated to a demonstration of horsemanship, perhaps some calf roping and sit down to a parillada. The estancias vary tremendously, some concentrated on breeding polo ponies, others were exclusively cattle operations.

    If you get to see one of the estancias farther out in the provinces you might get a more genuine taste of what life is like on one of these working ranches. You might also want to check with your travel agent, some of the estancias double as bed/breakfasts and some, particularly in Patagonia, offer great opportunities for outings and other tours.

    Please visit my San Antonio de Areco pages for more information.

    Estancia Visit
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    Pet and feed wild animals!

    by livinlovenlaugh Written Feb 7, 2013

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    Lujan zoo about an hour outside of Buenos Aires is one of only 5 zoo's in the world where you can interact with wild animals. It was a once in a lifetime treat! Lions, tigers and Bears OH MY! Our Taxi driver was happy to bring us there for $120 U.S. and wait for 4 hours while we intermingled with these amazing animals. The entrance fee was $25. pp U.S. I would love to recommend this driver though I understand it is not permitted you may contact me for more information though. :)

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    Iguazu Falls

    by livinlovenlaugh Written Feb 7, 2013

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    What an amazing and memorable experience Iguazu Falls is a wonderland of beauty. You are simply awe struck from the first moment you see one of the falls. You will find it very easy to follow the maps no guide is needed. From the Argentina side the entrance fee is aprox. $25. US. per person. They tell you it is not possible to do the whole park in a day I disagree. We started when they opened and were done by 2 p.m. However if you need to take it a little easier they offer a second day return at half price. I would suggest in the summer that you visit the Garganta Del Diablo first. It is approximately 2 miles of catwalks over the river. The sun is very intense in the later part of the day. Then I would do the Sendero Macuco the rainforest is best in the morning. Then to the Circuito Superior and then the Circuito inferior. If your very lucky as we were San Martin Island will be open. It is free to enter however they only open it once in a while in good weather conditions and only allow 500 people per day. You can see what you would see from the Brazilian side without having to actually go to the Brazillian side. The Safari adventure is a waste of time and money. However if you don't mind getting soaked they offer a ride under the Falls about $20. pp. which is highly recommended. This little wonder of the world is positively breathtaking and should not be missed in a lifetime. Do remember to wear sunscreen and insect repellant.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Argentine Beef

    by GentleSpirit Written Jan 18, 2013

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    Argentina, for most of the last two centuries, has been one of the largest producers of beef in the world. With abundant land, a favorable climate and seemingly unlimited room to expand, beef and ranching were mainstays of the Argentine economy.

    For the visitor this has traditionally meant the best of all worlds. Argentine beef has traditionally been grass fed, which is lower in saturated fat (and cholesterol) than feedlot beef. Argentine steak has been a staple of the national diet.

    This is gradually changing. The high price for grains has caused many ranchers to limit their herds and switch to grains, which are in large part exported to China. More cattle are now raised in feedlots. You can still get the traditional grass fed beef, but the price has gone up and it is harder to get.

    There is presently a movement to label beef by source of feeding, and to return to the traditional ways. We can't be sure of how successful this will be.

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    Admire the Wildlife

    by GentleSpirit Updated Dec 18, 2012

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    With such enormous open spaces and diversity of landscapes Argentina has a richness in wildlife that is surprising to the visitor. There are still enough wild places that you can see an animal in their own environment.

    In the North of the Country, you will be able to see the llama, guanaco and vicuna (if you go high enough.) The lllama is considered a pack animal in the mountains and is a fixture in these parts. You will see the guanaco in all parts of the country, far from the cities.

    Along the Andes, in unreachable canyons, you will get to see the mighty Andean condor with its dramatic flight and huge wingspan. I saw the condor in Cordoba (Villa Carlos Paz) Province, San Juan/Rioja Provinces as well as in the North in Salta/Jujuy Provinces.

    In Patagonia, along Argentina's Atlantic Coast you will find what to me was one of the most unforgettable places. Argentina has the largest penguin rookery outside of Antartica. The Valdez Peninsula, in Chubut Province, is a phenomenal place to see marine life. You will be able to see the magellanic penguins, killer whales, the ballena austral (Southern Right Whale) sea lions and others here.

    Magellanic Penguin- Punta Tombo Penguin rookery Guanaco- Patagonia near the border with Chile Carpintero (woodpecker)- Cordoba Province
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    A first trip to Argentina

    by GentleSpirit Updated Dec 18, 2012

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    Lets assume that you have about 2 weeks for your first trip to Argentina. Your travel agent (and you do need one) will usually strongly recommend some variation of a highlights trip that includes some of the following:

    1. Iguazu Falls (northeast Argentina)-1 or 2 days
    2. Mendoza- (western Argentina) at least 3 days- wines, scenery
    3. Buenos Aires and surroundings- the great capital city, Colonia (Uruguay), the estancias- 3-5 days
    4. Patagonia
    -El Calafate- glaciers, amazing scenery
    -Bariloche- amazing scenery, winter sports

    Though this sort of tour is entirely reasonable, and you will see a huge amount of things, it is a lot of traveling and that much moving around in Argentina is not always the most convenient thing. There are huge distances involved.

    I urge you to please consider seeing Argentina by regions, there is a huge number of fascinating things to do and see. You could easily fill a two week trip in each of Argentina's regions.

    Llao Llao Peninsula- San Carlos de Bariloche
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    'BIG BEN'

    by DAO Written Oct 8, 2012

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    The Torre de los Ingleses (English Tower) is often called Big Ben. It was built in 1916 by local British residents who had made their fortunes building the nearby Retiro railroad station complex. It was constructed to commemorate the centenary of the May Revolution of 1810 (Revolución de Mayo). Spain had lost great political and military authority during the Napoleonic wars and a British ship was seen off nearby Uruguay. This led the local people of Buenos Aires to force the resignation of the Viceroy appointed by the Spanish crown. It was the first time locals held any political power in Argentina.

    It was designed by Ambrose Poynter and built by Hopkins y Gardom, with materials shipped from England. The inauguration of the building took place on May 24, 1916 and was attended by President Victorino de la Plaza and local British dignitaries. The building celebrates the United Kingdom with reliefs of an English rose, Welsh dragon, Scottish thistle and Irish shamrock. It has 8 floors and the bells are imitations of the ones in Westminster Abbey, not the Houses of Parliament (Big Ben). It is open 10am-5pm Mon-Fri and admission is free.

    The Torre de los Ingleses, Buenos Aires The Torre de los Ingleses, Buenos Aires The Torre de los Ingleses, Buenos Aires The Torre de los Ingleses, Buenos Aires The Torre de los Ingleses, Buenos Aires
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Argentina Things to Do

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