Related Bolivia Favorites Tips

  • La paz, as I love it!
    La paz, as I love it!
    by goodmike
  • Potosi
    Potosi
    by kiwigal_1
  • Salar de Uyunii
    Salar de Uyunii
    by kiwigal_1

Most Viewed Favorites in Bolivia

  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Itinerary for Bolivia and Peru

    by AlbuqRay Updated Nov 23, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The first thirteen days of this itinerary include the high priority activities in Bolivia sans Lake Titicaca and Tiwanaku. The roads to these two places were blocked because of political demonstrations the whole time I was in Bolivia and I was unable to visit them as planned. Fremen Tours substituted the Yungas for the original Lake Titicaca days. You need much more time in some of these places but I was trying to see as much as possible in 18 days.

    Fondest memory: Hard to pick between the 4WD tour of southern Bolivia and the riverboat trip on the Mamore River, but probably the former.

    Itinerary for See-It-All Tour of Bolivia
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Conclusion of My Fondest Memory

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Even being careful of our water, we were down to less than quarter liter about halfway though the walk and though beautiful, all we could think about was something to drink. We finally found a craftsman weaving a blanket and luckily he was selling beverages as well. It was a bit overpriced but at this point, we would have bought a litter for $10! We greedily drank and asked how far it was to the port and were glad to hear it was very close. We made our way there in a more relaxed manner now. We knew we would make the boat on time and wouldn't keel over from thirst. On arrival, we found some food vendors and made our way to the hamburger girl. We had shirked from the greasy affairs on the mainland but it tasted like a prime rib at this point. We basked in the sun awaiting the boat and reflected on a nightmare day that now didn't seem so bad. I vowed to never be so under prepared again, to carry more cash at all times. And hoped there would be ATM's in the rest of our Bolivian stops.

    Happy to reach the end of the dry hike
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Not a sheet of ice, but a desert of salt.

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Bolivia offers a multitude of hiking opportunities and lots of adventure travel options but the Salar de Uyuni is not to be missed. The easiest and cheapest way to visit this remote area are four-wheel drive tours run from the city of Uyuni itself.

    Fondest memory: Bolivia seemed so incredibly cheap the first day we were there that I never thought to ask how much it was for the Internet. We had secured a room for $3 and just had a huge trout dinner in a fancy tourist restaurant for less than that price each. The Internet was never more than a dollar in Peru and I just assumed it would be even less here so we both went on for an hour with little thought. I was a little light on money as there were surprisingly no ATM's in Copacabana, which was our first Bolivian stop. Traveler's checks had proved of little use as large commissions were charged to exchange them and we had only emergency funds in cash so I had exchanged only a little and hoping for an ATM in La Paz. The day started out so inexpensively that it seemed $20 would last forever but the splurge meal had cut into it, and we had an early morning departure for Isla del Sol planned. When I went to pay for the Internet I was stunned when I was told I owed 60 bolivianos for the two of us. This was the equivalent of over $8 and though a typical price for an Internet cafe in Europe, it was highway robbery in South America. I forked over the money and walked out with about 2$ in my pocket to now empty nighttime streets devoid of money changers and still lacking an ATM to save the day. (continued below in MY Fondest Memory)

    Salt mines of Colchani
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • utttz's Profile Photo

    PEOPLE

    by utttz Updated Sep 3, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: bolivian people is so far the people I liked more around the world. Calm, helpful, bound to play and dance but alway colorfully sober bolivians are fantastic, no matter if you're in the altiplano or amongst cambas in the "lowland". It's quite rare to be vendor assaulted and even more rare to be beggar assaulted. This is more true out of town, as usual, but even in big town in touristic spots you almost feel ignored.
    (only exception are: a bar in sucre and the "change corner" in santacruz)
    a question, a preguntita, always get an answer and everyone will do everything he can to help you.

    Fondest memory: the man with a cart, dick.. the panamerican congress of mechanics which repaired one of our moto in santacruz, angel, the old lady speaking about che while feeding us with papa reillenas and the lady next door.. The cambas girl who lived in italy with all her suggestion about police (the most likely to rob you) and restaurants... lot of people.

    going nuts?
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • utttz's Profile Photo

    aqui no hay nada y todo se puede

    by utttz Updated Sep 1, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: needs sharpen brains, if you need a confirm to this old says have a trip to bolivia and broke something "hard" to repair: You'll probably find someone that with a few ancient tools and lot of skill can solve your problem. Bolivians are also renown soldering and machine tool wizard so a missing part can be easily rebuilt

    Fondest memory: I do think that the best way to travel through bolivia is with a car or motorbike or anything mechanic pretending some new fault any new town just to have it repaired!

    repairing the carter
    Related to:
    • Motorcycle
    • Arts and Culture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    Bolivia's Neighbor's

    by pepples46 Written Aug 8, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: the isolation of Bolivia as an interior Country, no passage to the Ocean, no Port left it frustrated and holding back real prosperity, and very much vunerable sandwitched between its neighbors, Peru, in the north, Brasil and Paraguay the west and Chile at its south borders

    Fondest memory: but of course as a travellerer we have the oppertunity combining several Countries on our travels through this part of the world

    Bolivias Border Nations
    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    through the Gran Chaco

    by pepples46 Updated Jul 14, 2003

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I traveled from Sao Paulo/Brazil, by Train via the Gran Chaco, to Bolivia.
    And this is already my fondest Memory.
    The People I traveled with, the Animals, as soon as we ran into rural area. The Food, bought from the native people.
    I was unfortunate, not knowing the difference, between a native Rat and a Guinea Pic, you know those small little creppers we keep in a Cage in our Flats, I ate the well prepared Rat. So I've been told, when arriving at my Friends Place in Santa Cruz the la Sierra.
    Well, to my defence and standing up for Rat's, they did taste great! I am not saying..do try it, but when taking the Train,from Sao Paulo....Corumba....GrandChaco...into Bolivia, it could happend to you or could it not?
    Guinea Pic has always been a feast for the people in Bolivia and Peru. a Families wealth is judged by how many Guinea Pic's they own.

    Fondest memory: When I left Bolivia, taking the Plane,VARIG,back to Brazil, I remember the friendly People, and although burdend with Hardship, in the 70's they where very kind to Strangers.

    I passed out, when I arrived in La Paz, situated at 3500m, the Oxygen just did not arrive in my brain, I know I left alway's something behind when I traveled, and that 'old' Indian Women cared for me.Her face stayed for a long time in my Memory.

    Santa Cruz de la Sierra
    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    History

    by tini58de Updated Jun 19, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: .

    The history of Bolivia reflects both its pre-Columbian and its colonial heritage. The ruins of Tiahuanaco testify to the first great Andean empire. Bolivians still speak the languages of the Aymara kingdoms and of their Quechua conquerors; the society remains predominantly Indian and rural, and only a minority is monolingual in Spanish. Nevertheless, Spain also left its imprint in the political, economic, and social spheres. During 300 years of colonial rule, Spain imposed its institutions on the colony and concentrated on mineral exports, which are still the backbone of the Bolivian economy. Using forced Indian labor, local entrepreneurs extracted the mineral wealth--the silver deposits at Potosí were the largest in the Western world--and shipped it to Spain in accord with the prevailing mercantilist practices.

    After Bolivia received independence from Spain in 1825, political instability became endemic. Rivalries among caudillos resulted in numerous coups and countercoups. Despite attempts at reform by the nation's first three presidents, the economy did not recover from the disruptions caused by the wars of independence; taxes paid by the Indians were the main sources of income for the governments.

    The military governments in power after 1964 varied in their ideological outlook.The attempt at a transition to democracy after 1978 failed at first because no single party achieved a majority in three elections, and alliances of various groups could not break the deadlock. Only in 1982 did the military return the country to democratic government.
    .

    Fondest memory: .
    here is a fantastic website on the History of Bolivia:

    http://www.countryreports.org/history/bolihist.htm

    Replica of an Inca temple

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Some Facts

    by tini58de Updated Jun 19, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: .

    Full country name: Republic of Bolivia
    Area: 1,098,580 sq km (428,446 sq mi)
    Population: 8,328,700
    Capital city: La Paz (pop 2,406,377) and Sucre (pop 132,000)
    People: 30% Quechua Indian, 25% mestizo, 30% Aymará Indian, approx 15% European (principally Spanish)
    Language: Spanish but most Indians speak either Quechua or Aymará; composite dialects of Spanish-Aymará and Spanish-Quechua are also widely spoken
    Religion: 95% Roman Catholic, Protestant (Evangelical Methodist)

    Bolivian

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Folklore and Traditions

    by tini58de Updated Jun 19, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Nowadays, the religious tradition lives on as yet another living example of the blending of cultures, with Catholic festivities having many of the same ingredients and receiving a similar devotion to that of precolumbian people. There are still offerings to the Pachamama and to the Virgin as one. The Saints are carried out in litters, but they are often adorned with offerings of vegetables, bread, fruits and glittering objects. The result is a year round display of devotion, ritual, colour and a tradition that is very much alive.

    Musical traditions within Bolivia are distinctly regional: strains of Andean music from the desolate Altiplano are suitably haunting and mournful, while those of warmer Tarija, with its compliment of bizarre musical instruments, take on more joyful tones. Dances such as the cueca, auqui-auqui and tinku hold a reverent place in popular culture. Other forms of folk expression include spinning and weaving, which display regional differences but have changed little over the last 3000 years.

    present given to us by our Bolivian tourguide

    Was this review helpful?

  • chancay's Profile Photo

    Bolivian Anden

    by chancay Updated Jun 17, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: A big part of Bolivia are the Anden and the large Altiplano (Highlands). The first time in Bolivia one of the incredible impressions was passing by car altitudes of almost 5000m, and you didn´t realized this altitude. All the time going at almost 4000m you can´t believe that these "little" mountains are already at moe than 6000m. An amazing impression for me....then driving above the clouds as near this little village "Sibiria"...unbelievable.

    at about 4200m
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • chancay's Profile Photo

    another pic of the Magic forest

    by chancay Updated Jun 17, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: to point it out here: driving or just walking around in Bolivia makes you see and meet alwayssomething new!!

    Fondest memory: a little sea next to the forest and therefor a (the) reason for the big humity in the forest. All together it gives this absolutely mysthic idea. Some kind of mixture of "Lord of the Rings" and "The mists of Avalon". Great atmosphere

    bosque de mago
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • monica_pons's Profile Photo

    Take care with your Gifts

    by monica_pons Written Mar 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: When travelling around Bolivia, particularly rural areas, some of us may be shocked by the apparently backward and often primitive living conditions that we encounter. In response, some are moved to compare the locals lot with our own, and experience pangs of conscience and outrage and inequalities. In attempt to salve the guilt or inspire goodwill, many distribute gifts to local children and adults.
    In Bolivia and many other developing countries, the lack of money, tv, cars or expensive things does not necessarily indicate poverty. The people of rural Bolivia have animals, food and homes that provide sufficient food, clothing and shelter.
    When short-term visitors give money, they impose a foreign system of values and upset a well-established balance.
    If you wish to be accepted by local people, perhaps share a conversation, teach a game from home or share your own meal. If you wish to make a bigger difference, you can donate money or better supplies to organisations working to improve rural condition. Bring a supply of bandages, rehydratation mixture or other medicines and leave them with local health-care nurse, or buy a handful of pens and a stack of exercise books and give them to the school teacher.

    Doctor from Centro Sant Juan Bautista

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    More of My Fondest Memory

    by richiecdisc Updated Jan 31, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: The next morning I went out early to find the money changers only come out when there are incoming buses and returned to the hostel to see if the owner had any suggestions. She said we could pay for the tour and room on our return from the island and we gladly accepted the offer. The smart move would have been to order breakfast and a big bottle of water, and put them both on the tab but it seemed I had left my brains in Peru. Instead I bought a few rolls and off we trudged to the boat hungry with half a litter of water. The ride to the island was stunning and the weather picture perfect. We had opted to be dropped off at the top port and then walk our way for four hours to the southernmost one, where we would be picked up. We quickly set off snapping photos the whole way and forgoing what I assumed to be the more expensive shops of the port area. The island was gorgeous and it being the off season, not nearly as touristy as I had expected. This bode well for photographic opportunities but not for finding something to eat, or drink for that matter. The great weather also translated to it being very hot and dry on what turned out to be a walk straight across the highest ridge on the island. Soon we found ourselves parched and with a dwindling water supply. I had grabbed a bag of granola from my backpack that was left over from the Santa Cruz Trek and though it was dry, at least we have the energy to do the four-hour walk. We laughed as we ate what I had nearly thrown away a couple of times as being not worthy of consumption. (conclusion below under My Fondest Memory)

    dry and dusty trail

    Was this review helpful?

  • Pietro_4wd's Profile Photo

    Diversity and fidelity to the original roots.

    by Pietro_4wd Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: TIWANAKU

    Fondest memory: It,s difficult to take only one memory of Bolivia, because the fully unforgettable moments lived on my travels to this beautiful land. Please, left me bring you three of them:
    -1- The really splendid historical buildings on Sucre
    -2- The incredible magnifiscence of the Oruro Festivities devoted to the Virgin of the Socavon (always last weekend before ash-wednesday, previous to the Holy Week Memories)
    -3- Visit to Tiwanaku pre incaic archeological site.

    Sucre
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Bolivia Hotels

See all 131 Hotels in Bolivia
  • Residencial Rosario

    Hotel Rosario is pretty nice. The staff is very friendly and helpful. The rooms are very clean and...

    more
  • Hotel del Desierto

    Ojo de Perdiz, Sud Lipez, Uyuni, Bolivia

  • Colonial Hotel

    C.Hoyos 8 Potosi Bolivia South America, Potosi,

    Satisfaction: Average

    Good for: Families

    Hotel Class 2 out of 5 stars

Top Bolivia Hotels

La Paz Hotels
374 Reviews - 874 Photos
Santa Cruz Hotels
66 Reviews - 135 Photos
Uyuni Hotels
301 Reviews - 909 Photos
Isla del Sol Hotels
54 Reviews - 181 Photos
Santa Cruz de la Sierra Hotels
41 Reviews - 81 Photos
Coroico Hotels
37 Reviews - 140 Photos
Copacabana Hotels
148 Reviews - 295 Photos
Villa Tunari Hotels
See nearby hotels
Uyuni Hotels
4 Reviews - 47 Photos
Trinidad Hotels
13 Reviews - 72 Photos
Tarija Hotels
5 Reviews - 7 Photos
Sucre Hotels
71 Reviews - 140 Photos
Sopocachi Hotels
1 Hotel
Samaipata Hotels
4 Reviews - 23 Photos
Salinas de Garci Mendoza Hotels
See nearby hotels

Instant Answers: Bolivia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

16 travelers online now

Comments

Bolivia Favorites

Reviews and photos of Bolivia favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bolivia sightseeing.
Map of Bolivia