Pelourinho, Salvador da Bahia

4 out of 5 stars 31 Reviews

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  • Entry to the Pelourhino, the Terrace of Jesus.
    Entry to the Pelourhino, the Terrace of...
    by NedHopkins
  • They pose for tips.
    They pose for tips.
    by NedHopkins
  • The elevador connects the upper and lower cities.
    The elevador connects the upper and...
    by NedHopkins
  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Pelourinho

    by draguza Written Mar 15, 2014
    Me at Pelourinho

    The historical centre itself, which revolves around the Pelourinho quarter with its triangular place, is characterized by its fidelity to the 16th-century plan, the density of its monuments, and the homogeneity of its construction on a hilly and picturesque site which embellishes the urban scenery by providing steeply falling and ascending views of incomparable beauty.
    In addition to a number of major buildings of the 17th-18th centuries, such as the cathedral and the convents of St Francis, St Dominic, Carmel and St Anthony, Salvador also retains a host of 16th-century open spaces (Municipal Plaza, House of Mercy) and Baroque palaces (Archiepiscopal Palace, Saldanha Palace, Ferrão Palace, etc.).
    There are also many streets which are characteristic of the colonial city, lined with bright multicoloured houses, which in some cases are decorated with high-quality stucco.

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    The Pelourinho

    by NedHopkins Updated May 10, 2012

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    Casa de Jorge Amado, the Pelourinho
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    The Pelourinho is the 'old town' of Salvador. Located on a bluff above the port, it is the largest concentration of colonial–era buildings in the New World. Among them are several magnificent cathedrals.

    ('Pelourinho,' alas, means 'pillory' or 'whipping post.' In front of the building pictured here, slaves were brought for punishment — flogging in public adding humiliation to pain and serving as a warning to other slaves.)

    There's music almost every night in the Pelourinho's large central square; the world–famous Grupo Olodum is among the bands that play. (Olodum puts a good part of its earnings into youth–help groups.)

    Brazil's most famous novelist, Jorge Amado — who died in 2001 — worked in and near the Pelourinho. The Casa de Jorge Amado exhibits mementos of the writer's life and writings.
    Art galleries, souvenir shops, fine restaurants … the Pelourinho is not to be missed.

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    Casa de Jorge Amado

    by acemj Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you're trying to decide which museum to visit in Largo do Pelourinho, go to this one instead of the Museu da Cidade. Once again the signage is exclusively in Portuguese (people must have thought I was a slow reader when they saw me struggling to decipher the information on the signs).

    As the name implies, the museum is dedicated to Brazil's most well-known writer, Jorge Amado. Unfortunately, at the time of my visit, I had never read one of his books, but since I love literature, I was very interested in learning about him. Keep in mind, I don't read Portuguese, but from what I could tell, Amado was fairly unknown for a time. Then he was accused of being a communist and fled to Prague where he remained in exile for awhile. Then, when the dust settled he began to focus his stories on the lives of women and the poor and set most of his stories in his home of Bahia. The streets of Pelourinho are the setting for his popular novel, Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands.

    Check out the website below for more info and reading suggestions.

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    Pelourinho

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 27, 2011

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    Pelourinho

    You cannot go to Salvador without visiting the old city, Pelourinho. Pelourinho is an amazing part of Salvador with lot of colourful colonial buildings, cobble stoned streets and beautiful churches.

    Pelourinho means whipping post in Portuguese and it was here, the slaves were tortured and sold. You'll find the old slave auction located at Largo do Pelourinho (Praça José de Alencar).

    The area was restored in the 1990s, and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site.

    Absolutely worth a visit!

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    Pelourinho

    by cachaseiro Updated Nov 7, 2009

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    Pelourinho

    Pelourinho is the old part of Salvador.
    It used to be a very dangorous part of Salvador, but today it's very safe.
    UNESCO has put a lot of money in to restoring the old city center and today there are tourist police all over the place.
    The place is getting quite touristy, but it's still worth a visit.

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  • The best pousada in Salvador da Bahia

    by irene.messina Written Jun 7, 2008

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    From a traveler to a traveler!!!

    If you are stopping by Salvador, and you are looking for a place to stay, you must stay at "Terra Nossa" Rua Leovigildo de Carvalho No. 3 Pelourinho.

    I've been there each time I was in Salvador, its right in the centre of Pelourinho, nice, clean and frendly pousada.

    Plus you will meet Tex (owner of the place) which can give you really helpful tips, where to go what to see, as he has being traveling all around Brasil before settle down in Salvador.

    You will feel like at home!!!! Best place to stay if you are in Salvador!!!

    Irene Messina from Italy

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    Pelorinho district

    by toonsarah Written Jan 26, 2008

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    Colourful buildings of Pelorinho, Salvador
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    Anybody visiting Salvador winds up spending at least some time in Pelourinho. Pelourinho is the Old City, the old heart of Salvador, with colonial-era buildings and winding cobblestone streets. The area was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985 and has been largely restored during the 1990s. It is full of bars and restaurants and small shops, but is also quite self-consciously touristy. You’ll see groups of tourists being led en masse by guides from historical site to historical site, hounded by vendors with cheap trinkets. The area was more "authentic" before, but the trade-off was that one was also far more likely to be robbed.

    "Pelourinho" means pillory, and the district gets its name from the fact that Salvador's last pillory stood at the top of the sloping Largo do Pelourinho. Nowadays a square of broken marble at the top of the Largo do Pelourinho (in front of what is now the Casa de Jorge Amado) marks the spot where the pillory stood, that stone column to which slaves were bound, beaten, humiliated and tortured, the pelourinho which was eventually to give Salvador's first neighbourhood its name. This was also the site of the slave auctions

    I found this area incredibly photogenic, but it’s also where we had the most hassle from street traders which irritated me, especially when I was trying to compose my photos. I like shopping when on holiday but on my terms, and when I’m pestered to buy I usually do the opposite of what they want and walk away! However I did enjoy browsing in several of the numerous shops and galleries in “Pelô” as the locals call it.

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  • mircaskirca's Profile Photo

    Pelourinho - The Old Heart of Salvador

    by mircaskirca Updated Aug 5, 2007

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    There is no visit of Salvador without spending some time in the old city of colourful pastel-hued colonial buildings, cobblestoned streets and a sense of history, clustered around the Largo do Pelourinho, also known as Praca Jose de Alencar.

    Pelurinho is a living museum with numerous buildings from 16th and 17th centuries fully restored to their original beauty and charm (there are always buildings undergoing restoration as the job is practically endless). It's the largest example of Baroque architecture in the America's, declared in 1985 a UNESCO Cultural Heritage site.

    "Pelourinho" means whipping post and this is where African slaves were publicly punished during colonial times. Slavery was outlawed in 1835, and over time, this part of the city, though home to artists and musicians, fell into disrepair. A major restoration effort resulted in making the area a highly desirable tourist attraction.

    During the day you can walk the streets, looking into the many clothing and art shops, bars, restaurants, museums and churches. At night Pelourinho offers music and dance events in its many public squares. The Laranjeiras area is loaded with charming restaurants offering delicious Bahian food and a number of programmed events take place during the week.

    No other place reflects so well the soul of Bahia as Pelourinho!

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    Pelourinho II

    by MikeAtSea Written Mar 4, 2007

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    Pelourinho
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    Pelourinho was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1985. That was the day when major renovation started. Since 1993 this is also be financed by UNESCO. The cobblestone streets, the churches and old colonial houses are certainly one of the main attractions of Salvador.

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    Pelourinho

    by MikeAtSea Written Mar 4, 2007

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    Pelourinho
    1 more image

    Pelourinho is the old town of Salvador. It is named after the pillory where salves were punished. Until the 1990's Pelo as it is called by the locals fell into disrepair. In recent years however a lot of effort and money has been spend uplifting the area to its former glory.

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    A visit to Pelourinho

    by sof76 Updated May 5, 2006

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    While you are in Salvador you must go to Pelourinho, it's historical center.
    A very cute colonial place!

    Mientras estes en Salvador tenes que ir a Pelourinho, su centro historico.
    Es un lugar colonial muy lindo.

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  • bsfreeloader's Profile Photo

    Explore Pelourinho

    by bsfreeloader Updated Apr 3, 2006

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    Although a bit touristy, the Pelourinho area exposes you to all the good things (and some of the bad) that Salvador has to offer. There are some fine examples of colonial architecture, some of the best being the Cathedral Basilica, Igreja de Sao Francisco, Igreja da Ordem Terceira de Sao Francisco, and the Igreja da Nossa Senhora dos Pretos. There are also several museums worth visiting, the most interesting of which is probably the Museu Afro-Brasileiro. Additionally, street corner baianas serve up traditional Bahian cuisine, including a disgusting looking but tasty dish called vatapa (it's a yellow porridge of palm oil, coconut, shrimp and garlic). It is also a great place to hear live music, and the sounds of samba, reggae, and forro, among others, can be heard in the streets and in the bars. At the same time, Pelourinho and the surrounding area is full of beggars and thieves. Despite a strong police presence, it's a place in which it is difficult to ever feel safe.

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    OLD COLONIAL SALVADOR

    by schurlif Written Feb 19, 2006

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    IGREJA S��O FRANCISCO, 17TH CENTURY
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    In July 2002 friends of mine from Vienna ( where I come from ) came to visit , one with wife and all of them with all their daughters... We flew to Salvador where we hired our own private minibus with driver ( we were a party of 12 , see picture # 5) and the plan was to go from Salvador to Recife on our own schedule.

    Here are pictures of our first day and first walk , in colonial Salvador , mainly around the Praça da Sé , Terreiro de Jesus ( = Praça 15 de Novembro ) and further on to the Largo do Pelourinho. The first three pictures show Igreja de São Francisco ( with different foreground , *smiles*) , number 4 is Largo do Pelourinho , number 5 our group with our private bus....)

    Re Igreja São Francisco , Church of St. Francis of Assissi who would definitely not approve of this church in his name , because instead of being simple and humble as he was , the church is one astonishing example of extravagant and prodigal luxury with real gold leaf covering the wooden altar like wallpaper and with imported luxury tiles from Portugal in the courtyard..... Well , so be it......

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    Must see: Pelourinho!

    by ludogatto Written Jan 1, 2006

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    I I do not want to write many things on this ancient restored quarter, many others Vt mamabers have written good pages, mine is only an advice, you do not get lost the occasion to spend some hour walking, observing and discovering small corners of beauty, of old and new atmosphere. Not All the quarter has been restored, therefore there are still zones where people live with semplicity: the smile never does not lack.
    Keep in mind that is a tourist area and often someone can pevee you, keep in mind the normal rules of attention... and amuse yourselves.
    Here the atmosphere of the old Bahia di Dona Flor is breathed. You will be able to find various exhibitions in the road, percussionists (often children band) that of capoeira... tuesday evening there are sheduled exibition , you can find in the local newspaper ' A Tarde '.
    Have a look to mine travelogue on the Pelourinho: only some pics for gives an idea of the colors and the bright lights.

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    Walk around the pelorinho

    by slarnach Written Dec 30, 2005

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    The buildings are remarkable

    You will probably be staying in the pelorinho, in which case you are perfectly placed to explore on foot. It is quite a tourist centre so you will be constantly hassled by hawkers, but that's par for the course really. The party atmosphere really kicks in on Tuesdays, but every night feels like a festival to be honest...

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