Maringá Travel Guide

  • Maringá
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  • Maringá
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  • Animal Public Phones of Several Types near Park
    Animal Public Phones of Several Types...
    by glabah

Maringá Things to Do

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    Maring��'s Cathedral is city's most famous landmark 4 more images

    by glabah Updated May 27, 2011

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    UPDATE: I'm glad I got a chance to visit the cathedral in 2005! The stairway to the top of the observation deck is now closed as they want to do extensive repair and maintenance to the concrete structure. This was badly needed then, and has only gotten worse now. See my Photos the Cathedral travelogue for photos of the bulletin board featuring photos of the wear and tear to the church that needs to be repaired. The hope is that it will be opened again sometime in mid to late 2011, but they are really not certain when funds will be available to complete the work.

    There are two attractions of the Mariná Cathedral: the interior of the church and climbing up to the observation deck. For information on the inside of the church, see my tip about the interior.

    The Maringá central cathedral is a landmark cone shaped building, which is almost as tall as the highest of the high rise buildings in the city. The top of this cathedral has an observation deck that looks out over the city, and the surrounding countryside.

    There is no charge for entering the church itself, but to climb to the platform there is a charge of some R$2 or so - about US$1.40 depending on the exchange rate.

    There is a small museum about 4 floors up, but after that you have about 20 or so more floors to go. There is no elevator inside, so the entire trip must be done by stairs.

    Leave about 1 hour AT LEAST for the climb all the way up and all the way back down, plus rest breaks and viewing time. Remember to pace yourself so that you have enough energy to get back down!

    Be very careful on the stairs. They are worn in many places, and it is easy to fall.

    The cone shape of the cathedral makes for the climb becoming tighter and tighter the higher you go. Light on the stairs comes from windows that are on the side of the structure that are nearly invisible from the outside due to the shape of the building (see photo 1 and 2). At the top, there are open air square blocks that allow you to view the city (see photo 3 and photo 5) and surrounding countryside in the opposite direction (see photo 4).

    The stairway to the top of the cathedral is located on the right side after you pass through the main entrance. There is an attendant that you pay in order to gain access to the stairway to the top.

    For more photos inside and outside the Cathedral please see my my tip about the interior as well as my Photos the Cathedral travelogue.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

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    Entrance to the Maring�� Cathedral 4 more images

    by glabah Updated May 27, 2011

    Right in the middle of downtown Maringá you will find an approximately 30 floor tall giant concrete cone, which is the main cathedral for the city of Maringá. The church has a number of impressive art works in it, including the Stations of the Cross (of which there are 15) that are painted onto some of the pillars inside. Artwork also goes fairly high up into the vast cone shape ceiling.

    There is no charge for entrance to the Cathedral, but there is a charge for taking the staircase all the way to the top of the cathedral observation deck. (As of May of 2011, this has been closed for repairs). As this is a separate tourist activity please see my Climb to the Top of the Cathedral tip.

    The web site below claims that it is the tallest monument in South America and the 10th tallest in the world - though obviously if the structure is considered a building (which it is) then it is of no international note.

    Artwork is not just limited to the interior of the big church. The surrounding land on which the church sits includes a fair number of plaza and park like lands that also lend to the beauty of the place. It also means that there is no traffic directly outside the walls of the church, and the lack of city noise this creates helps the building be a good conteplative location.

    The Maringá Cathedral construction was started in 1959 but the building was not completed until 1972.

    For a few additional photos of the cathedral and its artwork, beyond the five photos associated with this tip, please see my Maringá Cathedral travelogue.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    Inga Park (Parque do Inga) is Currently Closed 2 more images

    by glabah Updated May 18, 2011

    NOTE CLOSURE: This park has been closed for renovation since approximately March of 2011. It is not clear to me if it will be reopened anytime soon.

    Some of the public phones near the park that are in the shape of various animals are still available for public use.

    This park is somehwat of a twin of the Parque Florestal dos Pioneiros (Pioneers Forest Park) but there are a few features that are different. There is a lake in the center of the Parque do Inga. The park is also mostly forested land, and is also a popular place with local bird life. The small zoo is supposed to contain animals that are typical of the region before it was converted to farm land, but in fact some non-native species appear to have made it into the zoo for display at times as well.

    The park was inagurated in 1971 to preserve a section of the native forest land of the city.

    Related to:
    • Zoo
    • Birdwatching
    • Hiking and Walking

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Maringá Hotels

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Maringá Restaurants

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    Martignoni Pizzaria has Amazing Mass of Pizza 4 more images

    by glabah Updated May 18, 2011

    To really appreciate Martignoni you first have to understand what a " rodizio" style pizza parlour is all about: " rodizio" basically translates to "rotary" in English, and that is what you get: a continuous rotation of pizzas circulating into the restaurant fresh baked from the ovens. You want a slice of something? Then say you want it. If it isn't the type you want, then let it pass by.

    Martignoni Pizzaria serves up some amazing delights from its wood fired ovens. There are over 50 types of pizza that arrive at your table over the course of two hours of eating, and no meal at Martignoni Pizzaria could be done in any less time than that.

    For best seating, arrive early in the evening, as there will be no place left to sit by around 9 or so on many nights.

    There is a glass window near the ovens so that patrons (particularly popular with the children!) may watch the pizza being made.

    If you so desire, it is possible to order a single pizza here for about R$25, but few people seem to do that, instead prefering the various options offered by the rodizio style service.

    Favorite Dish: Ordering a "Dish" from this place isn't what works: what you get is a continuous all you can eat rotation of pizza past your table.

    That being said, how can anyone possibly reject the "Brigadeiro" pizza, which is a dessert pizza with gobs of chocolate on it?

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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