Safety Tips in Brazil

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Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Brazil

  • worldcam's Profile Photo

    Caution, Caution, Caution

    by worldcam Written Feb 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with any travel destination there are things one, as a traveller, needs to be careful of. In Brazil, if you don't look like a Brazilian then you are a target. It is important to try to blend into the scenery so you don't stick out. Don't carry fanny packs, backpacks or daypacks...Brazilians don't do this and it'll tip the bad guys off in an instant that you might have a camera or a wallet hidden in your bag. Put things in a plain plastic bag one might get at a grocery store....less obvious. Do not take anything to the beach. Professionals work the beach and can lift your things from right out from under you even while you are on your blanket. If you go into the water, then it's even easier for them to make off with your goods. Don't open a map in the middle of downtown to try and figure out where you are.....you might as well paint a target on your body. Just be conscious of who is around you and have fun. Cabs can be bad -- cabbies have been known to rob tourists. Have your hotel get you a cab .. some hotels even have drivers "on call" for their guests.

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  • perfectly_zen's Profile Photo

    Surviving Tips =)

    by perfectly_zen Written Jul 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You must take care about some things when coming to Brazil...as everyone knows, many places in the country, mainly big cities, are not the example of safety....Because of the uncontrolled growth and the social difference, violence exists, unfortunately. There are a thousand stories of robberies, mainly in São Paulo and Rio. That does not mean you can´t get out of the hotel without being robbed....in fact most part of the country is extra safe, except the megalopolis....
    But the greatest reason for robberies is that people usually don´t pay attention and don´t take care...pickpockets are everywhere, waiting for someone unprepared to steal money, cameras and purses. If you follow some rules, you´ll be okay:
    1- Always ask about the surroundings...Inform yourself in the hotel or with locals if there is any danger on walking alone at night, if there is any place you should avoid going to or any caution to take. People are usually very concerned about the safety and will certainly warn you correctly...
    2- Avoid empty streets....always...no dark shortcuts on cities, keep yourself always in the most crowded places possible. At night, be ultra careful....never walk alone, beware of your surroundings, if there is any thing suspicious, go back....
    3- Get the minimum attention for you...that means no fancy shoes or famous trends...dress simple t-shirts and jeans. NEVER show off your wallet and count money in front of others, don´t wear expensive jewelry...cameras clinging to you neck are not a good idea...but them in your bag.
    4- NEVER, under no circumstances, leave bags or purses away from your sight....you must keep everything that is valuable with you or leave them in the hotel.
    5- Always be polite, discrete, don´t talk loud, don´t show to everyone you are a tourist....behave like everyone else around to get the minimum attention possible.

    If you take care, you won´t have problems in Brazil.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

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  • peterman2's Profile Photo

    SAFE BEACHES AROUND RIO ????

    by peterman2 Written Nov 28, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hey ...
    A question about safety in beaches in Rio,
    Brazil....
    Go to places where Brazilian go...
    like that fantastic beach, close to Niteroi,ITACOATIARA.
    I went there with Rafael ( DONRAFA ), a saturday.... full of people,,,, and we went swim and left money AND camera on the beach... IT WAS SAFE......
    CONCLUSION : TRAVEL WITH AND LIKE BRAZILIAN...AND IT WILL BE SAFE

    ITACOATIARA...and orgasm

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Crime

    by acemj Updated Dec 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The bigger cities in Brazil can be dangerous if you lack common sense and fail to take certain necessary precautions. While in Rio de Janeiro, Salvador da Bahia, Sao Paulo and other larger towns, be sure you try not to stand out as a rich tourist (i.e. an easy target from crime). The economic gap between the rich and the poor is wide in Brazil, and this tends to cause an increase in crime. Crimes can even get violent here, with kidnapping being a problem. My advice is to dress like a local, to leave your fancy watches and jewels at home and to avoid walking around at night. Cabs are plentiful and relatively cheap, so take advantage.

    Outside of the bigger cities, Brazil is reputably safe in terms of crime.

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  • peterman2's Profile Photo

    Dangerous Rio ?????

    by peterman2 Written Nov 25, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As many of you i had many concern about security in Brazil, in Rio.
    Like you read the "stories" in Rio in the newspaper. Yes it could be true, they talk about it on TV in Brazil.
    BUT I NEVER FEEL INSECURITY during my 3 weeks in Brazil.
    Why ???
    Because i was with a local guide, Rafael ( DONRAFA ). He knew where to go, i dress more like a brazilian ( simple and relax..).
    AND he makes me feel secure....all the time.

    Thanks to Rafael, NEVER i feel insecurity, NEVER....

    Rafael ready to protect you

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  • racheljapi's Profile Photo

    Recommended Vaccinations

    by racheljapi Written Jan 5, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here is a list of vaccinations that we all hear about and think we might need to get for Brazil. You don't need to get all of them and, in many cases, don't have to get any.

    Malaria:
    Prophylaxis with Lariam, Malarone, or doxycycline is recommended for forested areas within the nine states of the Legal Amazonia region, including Acre, Amapa, Amazonas, Maranhao (western part), Mato Grosso (northern part), Para (except Belem City), Rondonia, Roraima, and Tocantins, and for urban areas within this region, including the cities of Porto Velho, Boa Vista, Macapa, Manaus, Santarem, and Maraba.

    Hepatitis A
    Recommended for all travelers over age two. It should be given at least two weeks (preferably four weeks or more) before departure. A booster should be given 6-12 months later to confer long-term immunity.

    Typhoid
    For travelers who may eat or drink outside major restaurants and hotels (Basically for those traveling around smaller towns, drinking unfiltered water, etc.) (It will not hurt you to eat fruit or veggies that have been washed in tap water)

    Yellow fever
    Recommended for all areas except Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, the central eastern area to the coast, and the coastal areas south of Sao Luis. Required for travelers arriving from a yellow-fever-infected area in Africa or the Americas.

    Hepatitis B
    For travelers who may have intimate contact with local residents, especially if visiting for more than 6 months

    Rabies
    Recommended only for those at high risk for animal bites, such as veterinarians and animal handlers, and for long-term travelers who may have contact with animals and may not have access to medical care. In Brazil, most cases occur in the northeastern and northern regions and are related to dogs.

    Routine immunizations
    All travelers should be up-to-date on tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, polio, and varicella immunizations

    Cholera vaccine is not generally recommended.

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  • perfectly_zen's Profile Photo

    Advice for women only...=)

    by perfectly_zen Updated Jul 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Foreign women are usually very concerned about coming to Brazil, since what everyone hears is that brazilian men can be very unpolite and harrass women in general.
    I can´t agree with that. I live in this country, i was born here, and travelling to other places around Europe, I did not find any difference from where I come from. Of course, we can never generalize...brazilians usually have a more open behaviour, but we can´t say man can get aggressive or unpolite. Whistles, dying looks are common, many will try to talk to you, etc, but nothing more serious than that, usually.
    The major problem is that women travelling alone are the easiest target for robberies...If you are coming in an organized trip, with a group, it´s okay....but backpacking completely alone, depending where you are going to, is not really a good idea.
    Avoid walking alone at night or empty spots...
    If anywhere, someone approaches you and you don´t want to talk, the best behaviour is to politely ignore, or pretend you did not understand a word. Just don´t be aggressive or unpolite, NEVER.
    And if you want to get the minimum attention to men possible, avoid wearing provocative clothes or tight dresses.
    The rest is fun! =)

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

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  • Alless's Profile Photo

    INFORMATION CONCERNING VACCINATIONS WHEN TRAVELLIN

    by Alless Written May 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An international certificate of vaccination against polio is compulsory for children aged between three months and six years.
    An international certificate of vaccination against yellow fever is compulsory for travelers who, within three months prior to their arrival in Brazil, have visited or been in transit through the following countries:
    Angola, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, French Guyana, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Nigeria, Peru, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Venezuela and Zaire.
    Additionally, vaccination against yellow fever is recommended for all travelers when visiting the following states of Brazil:
    Acre, Amazonas, Amapá, Distrito Federal, Goiás, Maranhão, Mato Grosso do Sul, Pará, Rondônia, Roraima and Tocantins.
    Please note that yellow fever vaccinations take approximately 10 days to become effective.

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  • perfectly_zen's Profile Photo

    Be careful: don´t turn yourself into barbecue! =P

    by perfectly_zen Written Sep 10, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brazil is definately a sunny place, from south to north...this is a great thing, but you must take care with serious sunburns!
    Even in a cloudy day, if you are in the beach, you must use sun protector with more than 15 FPS...the climate can be very iluding....

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  • Alless's Profile Photo

    Tourist visa to Brazil

    by Alless Updated Oct 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    U.S., Canada, New Zealand and Australian Citizens need a visa
    to enter Brazil.
    Visa have been waived for citizens of the following countries:

    -Andorra
    -Argentina
    -Austria
    -Bahamas
    -Barbados
    -Belgium
    -Bermuda
    -Bolivia
    -Chile
    -Colombia
    -Costa Rica
    -Denmark
    -Ecuador -Finland
    -France
    -Germany
    -Greece
    -Island
    -Ireland
    -Italy
    -Liechtenstein
    -Luxembourg
    -Monaco
    -Morocco
    -Namibia
    -The Netherlands
    -Norway
    -Paraguay
    -Peru
    -Philippines
    -Portugal
    -San Marino
    -South Africa
    -Spain
    -Surinam
    -Sweden
    -Switzerland
    -Trinidad and Tobago
    -United Kingdom
    -Uruguay
    -Venezuela

    For these countries, only the following
    documents are required:
    A passport (or "cedula de identidade") valid for at least six months.
    A return onward ticket, or adequate proof that you can purchase your return fare, or proof of your ability to pay for your stay in Brazil.

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  • oldmonk_92129's Profile Photo

    Use caution

    by oldmonk_92129 Written May 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with any place in the world (particularly big cities), use caution.
    Do not make it obvious that you are a visitor or that you cannot speak Portuguese. A friendly local who can talk english (though not very common in Manaus) will be of immense help.
    Personally I have not had any problems in any place that I ventured out, a lot of times by myself. Even my colleagues who will visibly stand out in Northern Brazil at least have not had any problems.

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  • Copacabana - Shoe Shine scam

    by histrionia62 Written Jul 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I know others have warned about this, but just to reiterate: watch for shoe shine artists who create work for themselves by walking by and throwing something onto your shoe! I saw two shoeshiners get into a kicking fight with each other on the Copacabana beach boardwalk over an American woman customer after one was loudly exposing the other's scam.

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  • peace_prevails's Profile Photo

    Behavioiur course for gringos (esp. Americanos)

    by peace_prevails Written Nov 1, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OK, I can say this because I am a 6th generation Texan. Americans are loud, obstentatious, sometimes annoying, and a little too flashy with the bling. In Europe, this type of behaviour will earn one free passage on the A-train out of any establishment owned by a Frenchman.

    In Brazil, it will get you into serious trouble.

    If you speak english, wear gold (or other material objects that glimmer), sport shiny shoes, or tote around a prada bag, there is one word for you: TARGET.

    So, my modus operandi, when in Brazil, is to tone it down in public with the following rules:
    1. No jewelry.
    2. No ipod.
    3. No loud english in public.
    4. Carry belongings in an old bag.
    5. No gringo swimsuit and 'hawaiian' shirt on the beach.

    Also, be sure to watch for people watching you.

    Follow these rules, and have a great time in Brazil. You can really reduce your chances of being a target by doing these things, but there is one more thing to be said:

    If you ever are robbed or mugged, give them EVERYTHING without any arguing or struggle. A recent study just came out that said the odds of injury to person were over 800% greater when resisting an attack than when giving in. So, don't risk it.

    These rules mainly apply in large urban areas such as capitals, especially Rio. In rural areas you are by and large safe and can be a bit more relaxex.

    Don't mean to scare people, but good to be aware.

    Not approprate.... What I wear in Rio.Yes, the white glare still give iPOD - like wearing a sign that says 'please rob m

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  • janaina's Profile Photo

    CHILDREN HUMAN RIGHTS

    by janaina Updated Dec 4, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you'll be the unfortunate guy to be robber by a child in Brazil,I know,the feeling is like it's the end of fun and you'll feel probably very very upset!I agree!
    But,if for a second,you stop to think that a very huge part of these street children never had a single article from UNICEF'S CHILDREN RIGHTS CONVENTION respected,maybe,not to justify,but maybe,you'll understand why!

    ARTICLE 1:THE RIGHT TO AN IDENTITY
    Each children have the right to a name and nacionality,to know his or her parents and be cared for them.The government has an obligation to protect the child's identity,name,nacionality and family ties.

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  • janaina's Profile Photo

    PART II

    by janaina Written Dec 4, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2.THE RIGHT TO A FAMILY
    The government has to respect the rights and responsabilities of parents to provide proper guidance for their children in diferent ages.
    The child has the rights to live with his or her parents unless this is not in the child's best interests.The child has the right to maintain contact with both parents if separated from one or both.
    Children and their parents have the right to leave any country or enter their own country anytime to be reunited.
    Parents both have the responsability for raising the child,and the government shall suport this.
    Children without a family must be given special protection.
    Where adoption is aloud,it shall be caried out in the best interests of the chid.

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Comments (1)

  • Oct 23, 2013 at 5:05 AM

    Brazil: It was a great experience for me because i was with my husband to a professional course for two weeks organised very well and all the brazilian experience was very well planned, except the last day.
    It was the only date when we left to the airport alone in a taxi, not with the group, everybody having different flight schedule.
    We were on the highway in daylight at 18 pm at not more then 10 minutes to the airport when a car with two 16 years old favelas guys with guns stopped the taxi, threatened us and taking all they could take in 40 seconds, including our money, credit cards and passports!
    We had the worst two days until we managed to solve our provisional living tickets from Brazil, but we had great help from the course organiser, otherwise we would have been in a really bad place because our embassy wasn't in sao paulo, where everything happened, but in rio, and without money, credit card and passport...i don't want to know.
    So, Brazil, is dangerous, no mater what you say.
    It is a country of contrasts with beautiful and great people and places, but with lots of favelas and dangerous people and places.
    It is just a story that must help you to be more careful than us when you will visit Brazil.
    Everybody told us that we were lucky they didn't shot us.

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