La Moneda, Santiago

4 out of 5 stars 23 Reviews

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  • Palacio de la Moneda
    Palacio de la Moneda
    by spidermiss
  • Palacio de la Moneda (Rear)
    Palacio de la Moneda (Rear)
    by spidermiss
  • Back view of La Moneda
    Back view of La Moneda
    by MJL
  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    the palace of the president

    by globetrott Updated Apr 6, 2008

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    La Moneda / the Presidential Palace is in the centre of Santiago, well guarded by the official guards in fancy uniforms and you are able to see also the interior of the palace and some innercourts, but you will have to queue up so I skipped it, because I did not have enough time.
    In front of the palace there is a small park, where you can see the monuments of Salvador Allende and other former presidents of Chile.
    At the other side, facing the ringroad-boulevard there is a great fountain that is worth seeing (see my last 2 photographs!)

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  • kiwigal_1's Profile Photo

    Palacio La Moneda

    by kiwigal_1 Updated Jan 20, 2007

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    Palacio La Moneda
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    The La Moneda Palace is located downtown Santiago. It is an important historical building in the political history of Santiago, in particular the era of President Salvador Allende's term when the palace was bombed and where Allende allegedly committed suicide. This was the lead into the Pinochet coup.

    La Moneda is currently the government building and tourists are able to wander through. They have some lovely parks either side of it but don't even think of sitting on the grass or anything as it is not allowed.

    When the free trade agreement between NZ and Chile came into law in Chile I attended a signing ceremony in La Moneda where President Michelle Bachelet signed the papers.

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  • mev1976's Profile Photo

    El Palacio de la Moneda.

    by mev1976 Written Jun 17, 2004

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    Neoclassical presidential palace look much as it did in late colonial times, under Joaquin Toesca`s construction in 1778.
    After air attack in 1973 by Pinochet goverment, left the building unusable.
    Restored in 1981 is the officail president office now.
    Some parts are open to the public, and worth to visit it.

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  • The house of the government: La Moneda

    by Glospi Updated Apr 2, 2004

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    La Moneda, northern side

    At heart of the Civic Quarter, La Moneda was for many decades not only the government's house, but also home for the President in office, although this changed in the 60's.
    Before the 1973 military coup, which was the beginning of Gen. Augusto Pinochet's military dictatorship, it was open to the public but, fearing an attack on him, Pinochet closed it; in 2000, President Ricardo Lagos opened it again. Nowadays, its patios can be walked across freely just by asking permission for it to the Carabineros at the north gate (no documents nor ID asked). Going upstairs is not allowed, although journalists can get an extended visit permit at the entrance.
    Photographying the inside is freely allowed to everybody.
    When certain ceremonies are held, crossing permission is suspended during the ceremony, and then resumed.
    During the military coup, it was put under siege, tank-shelled and rocketed by fighter aircraft, some of whose "scars" can still be seen under the repairs made afterwards, and which took about 2 years to finish.

    Nikon F4s, 20 mm. Nikkor, f.8-11, 1/250 sec., POL filter, Kodak Ektachrome Elite EBX 100 slide film.

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  • Shift of guard at La Moneda

    by Glospi Written Apr 2, 2004

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    Shift of guard at La Moneda

    Every day, at 10 AM o'clock (sharp), the ceremony of shift of guard is performed by the Carabineros of the Guard Platoon at the northern gate of La Moneda palace, on Plaza Constitucion.

    The ceremony is interesting to see, with lots of orders given in a martial voice to the troops, and the leaving guard marching down Moneda St.
    Local people -both passers-by and tourists- gather to see it from the gardens of the square.
    Be there early if you want to see it, as it is strictly on time and lasts about 20 minutes only.

    Nikon F4s, 80-200 Nikkor, f.2,8-4, 1/500 sec., Kodak Ektachrome Elite 100 film.

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  • IIGUANA's Profile Photo

    La Moneda

    by IIGUANA Written Nov 21, 2003

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    La Moneda

    Chile's executive palace by excelence. This is where the president works and where chilean history has been made. You can go inside and walk around it's different patios. And if you've read some modern chilean history, yes: this is the place that was bombed back in 1973 to take out comunist president Allende off the goverment. Then Pinochet became president.
    Around the La Moneda, there are some goverment buildings, but they're not very pretty.
    One funny thing: the face of the palace overlooking the Alameda is actually the back side of the palace. The front door is the other way around.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Seat of the President of the Republic of Chile

    by Jefie Updated Sep 24, 2008

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    El Palacio de La Moneda in Santiago de Chile
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    El Palacio de La Moneda is located in what is known as Santiago's civic district, surrounded by different national departments. The construction of this large building began in 1784, following the plans of Italian architect Joaquín Toesca, who had also worked on the Catedral Metropolitana. The building's original purpose was to be the country's official mint, which is why it is still known today as "La Moneda". It became the seat of the government of Chile in 1845.

    In 1973, the building was badly damaged by bombs launched during the military coup that put Augusto Pinochet at the head of the country - Salvador Allende, who was President of the Republic at the time, is believed to have committed suicide at La Moneda during the coup and a statue honors his memory on the Plaza de la Constitucion, in front of the Palace. In the years that followed the coup, La Moneda was restored and today it still houses presidential offices. Unfortunately, we were too late for the changing-of-the-guard ceremony, but we did catch a protest on Plaza de la Constitucion!

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  • Museo Casa de Moneda (Mint's museum)

    by Glospi Updated Nov 27, 2004

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    The displays at the Chilean Mint museum

    Here's a little visited museum for those who want to add another one after being at the Artequin interactive arts museum, which is literally next door to it.
    The Museo de la Casa de Moneda (not to be confused with La Moneda government building), (the Chilean Mint) was inaugurated in October 2004 and has an interesting display of coins, banknotes and ancient coin-making artifacts, and may give a surprise to more than one foreign visitor, after finding out that (some) of their national currency is either printed or coined right here (and, BTW, just 100 metres behind is my apartment).
    Fixed magnifying glasses are set to inspect the smaller pieces, and an attractive display makes it easy to visit.
    The person in charge speaks some English, and is always happy to receive foreign visitors, to guide them through the display and explain anything asked.
    This is a high-security compound, so an ID is (friendly) asked to enter the museum, although the place itself is not on the most "critical" area.
    To get in, walk to the front gate, just 40 metres west of the Artequin, stand there and security personnel will open it for you from the inside.

    It is open on weekdays (Mon to Fri) during working hours (0900-1730).
    Buses 225 and 226 leave you at the very entrance of it, and subway (metro) station Quinta Normal is just 3 blocks away across the Quinta Normal park (which is a nice walk at any time and season).
    Photography (even with flash) and video are permitted with no restrictions.
    Entrance is free.

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  • ezaguryk's Profile Photo

    Palacio de la Moneda

    by ezaguryk Written Feb 26, 2005

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    Palacio la Moneda

    Is located in downtown. It was declared National monument, This palace is from half-full of century XIX the location of the government of Chile, is an exceptional example of an own architectonic style and technique. And it has very big plaza in front and that occupy all the block here you will find a statute of Salvador Ayende.

    Se ubica en el centro de la ciudad. Fue declarado monumento nacional, Moneda es desde mediados del siglo XIX la sede del Gobierno de Chile, es un ejemplo excepcional de un estilo y técnica arquitectónicos propios. En frente encuentras una plaza grandísima que ocupa toda la cuadra donde también encontraras una estatua de Salvador Allende.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Santiago's White House

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 6, 2008

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    Seat of power
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    Having been built to function as Santiago's Royal Mint but, following independence, for the next 110 years, from 1848 to 1958, the elegant white palace known as La Moneda was the home of Chile's Presidents. The president no longer lives here but the building remains the country's official seat of government.

    It lies between the Alameda to the south and the enormous Plaza de la Constitution on the north side. There is a public entry on the north side to the inner courtyards, where you'll find fountains, orange trees and some very smartly uniformed guards - they're police officers, not soldiers, despite the jackboots and high peaked hats.

    Looking at its pristine facade, it's hard to believe that only 35 years ago this is the building that was bombed to a ruin in air attacks ordered by General Pinochet in the coup that saw the deposing and murder of the democratically-elected Communist president Salvador Allende. The generals are gone now and as Allende surveys the scene from his plinth right beside the palace, flowers regularly declare " Allende Vive" (photo 5)

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Palicio La Moneda

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 21, 2010

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    Palacio de la Moneda
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    La Moneda faces the Plaza de la Constitucion. Palicio de la Moneda is the presidential palace and was known worldwide for the military coup in 1973 that brought the former dictator, Pinochet, to power and death of the President Salvador Allende. The neoclassical building stages the changing of the guard every other day at 10.00 am. You can visit the inner courtyards during the weekdays.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    La Moneda

    by filipdebont Written Nov 15, 2008

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    La Moneda
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    Palacio La Moneda, the presidential palace, located tat the Plaza de la Constitucion.

    This imposing building was first used as The Mint, which explains the name : La Moneda.

    Later on it was used as presidential palace, the president doesn't house her, and the presidential offices are here.

    At the big square there is one of the rare monuments of the former president Salvador Allende.

    At this same square there is every other day a big changing of the guard’s ceremony, at 10 o'clock. (See further tips)

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  • trek06's Profile Photo

    Palacio de la Moneda, Barrio Civico

    by trek06 Written Feb 15, 2006

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    Palacio de la Moneda
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    Formerly a presidential palace (beginning 1846), it was bombed by the Chilean airforce in1973 in General Pinochet's coup against the then president Salvador Allende. President Allende shot hiimself rather than being taken prisoner.

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  • Assenczo's Profile Photo

    Democracy has arrived

    by Assenczo Written Aug 22, 2006

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    Moneda from Moneda st.
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    Now it is funny but at the time when the bullets were leaving their marks it must have been quite serious. Unlike Bolivia’s or Peru’s equivalents, the Moneda Palace is accessible to the general public and guests. What a better manifestation of “everything is “tranquilo”. The flow of human admiration is one way though – control is undoubtedly there.

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  • maddogrick's Profile Photo

    La Moneda

    by maddogrick Written Feb 12, 2008

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    La Moneda
    2 more images

    La Moneda is the Presidential Palace, something of a misnomer since the president doesn't live there at all... it is her office, however. It was here in 1973 that Salvador Allende took refuge when the Pinochet regime went all out to oust him. While holed up in the palace, the airforce bombed and strafed the palace attempting to force Allende out. Rather than surrender, Allende gave an impassioned speech to the citizens condemning Pinochet and his followers by radio then took his own life.

    You can enter the palace courtyard and, at least when we were there, see a display of contemporary sculpture by Chilean artists. This may be a rotating display... I'm not sure. There also is a changing of the guard every second day at 10:00 A.M.

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