Santa Fe Travel Guide

  • Cathedral Madre in Plaza Mayor
    Cathedral Madre in Plaza Mayor
    by Terje1966
  • Santa Fe
    by Terje1966
  • Santa Fe
    by Terje1966

Santa Fe Things to Do

  • Plaza Mayor

    Plaza Mayor, the main square of Santa Fe de Antioquia, is where most people meet, sitting on one of the benches in the small park, chatting, eating or just watching the world pass by. The square is overshadowed by the Cathedral on one side, and palm trees, small bars, restaurants and market stalls on the other three sides. The wooden stalls are...

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  • Museo Juan del Corral

    Museo Juan del Corral is a beautiful colonial mansion from the 18th century converted into museum. It was open in 1970 with the help of community who donated a lot of objects for the exhibition. The museum is named after the town's liberator Juan del Corral. It was closed due to restoration in 1996 and reopened again only recently. During the time...

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  • Cementerio

    At the southeastern end of Calle 10, just a few blocks from Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno, you find the local cemetery. Though much smaller than Cementerio de San Pedro in Medellín, it's a peaceful and tranquil place which has historic tombstones and a 150-year-old cemetery chapel. Walls with tombs are decorated with flowers and notes. At the entrance...

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  • Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno

    Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno is another classical style building. It is from the early 19th century but another church stands here before. During colonial time it served as a cemetery and many priests were buried here. In 1828 the first stone was laid for the present church which was then opened in 1855, still unfinished. Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno has...

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  • Iglesia de Chiquinquirá

    Facing the Plazoleta de la Chincha is Iglesia de Chiquinquirá, popularly known as Iglesia de la Chincha. It is dedicated to the Virgin Mary under the protection of the Virgin of Chiquinquirá. The present church was constructed in 1868 on the site of a 17th century Franciscan temple. Built in a neoclassical style with baroque details, it has an...

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  • Iglesia de Santa Bárbara

    Located next to the Plazuela de Santa Bárbara, Iglesia de Santa Bárbara is one of the most impressive colonial era churches I saw in Colombia. It was built by the Jesuits at the end of the 18th century in a popular baroque style of Antioquia. Being the oldest standing church in the town, it is also called the Grandmother of the Churches of...

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  • Catedral Basilica Metropolitana

    Overlooking the main square is the old cathedral, Catedral Basilica Metropolitana, sometimes referred to as the Catedral Madre, as it was the first church built in the region. The Cathedral was constructed in 1797. The original church was destroyed by fire, and the building you see today was only completed in 1837. Until that year Iglesia de Santa...

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  • Strolling the Streets of Historic Centre

    Once the capital of the state of Antioquia, Santa Fe is well-preserved colonial town. The biggest attraction is the town itself. A stroll through the quiet, tranquil cobblestone streets of Santa Fe de Antioquia is an absolute delight. The old colonial centre looks much as it did during the 1800's, with narrow streets, whitewashed colonial...

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  • Iglesia de Jesus Nazareno

    The church of Jesus Nazareno has a white façade in a neoclassical style with baroque details. It was constructed in 1828 on the site of an older church. It was closed when I visited and is normally only open for evening mass at 19.00.

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  • Iglesia de Chiquinquira

    This church with a classical façade is known as La Chinca and it has the full name Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Chiquinquira. It was constructed in 1868 on the site of a church from the 17th century. Also this church has been used as a prison in the past (as the tower of the cathedral). Normally it is only open daily for evening mass at 19.00. The...

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  • Catedral Madre

    The cathedral is situated by the main square. Its façade is not all white, but on the lower part of the tower you can see the bricks and their colours. The cathedral is built on the same site as the first church constructed in Santa Fe de Antioquia and the surroundings, but the building you see today was completed in 1837. The cathedral was closed...

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  • Plaza Mayor

    Plaza Mayor is the main square in Santa Fe de Antioquia. It is nice to stroll around the square or sit down in the park to watch people. Around the square are wooden stalls selling a locally made sour-sweet candy made of tamarind. In the park there is a bronze statue of Juan del Corral, who was president of Antioquia the few years it was...

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Santa Fe Restaurants

  • Cosy Ambience of a Lush Garden Patio

    El Mesón de la Abuela is a welcoming little hospedaje with six rooms, including a six bed dorm, set in an old colonial house with a lush garden patio. Each room has private bathroom, ceiling fan and TV. Downstairs, in a lush garden patio, you find a very charming restaurant. What was so special about it are various collections of old things on the...

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  • Two Glasses of Juice for One Serving

    Did it ever happened that you ordered a drink and then two glasses of drink appeared on your table? It happened to me in Santa Fe de Antioquia, in a place called Jugos Budapest. What a surprise! I thought that the waitress misunderstood, thinking of somebody else was coming to join me. But not! I soon noticed that other guests also got two glasses...

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  • Lunch in Santa Fe de Antioquia

    First I went to Restaurante Portón del Parque, a restaurant in a colonial house that was recommended in my guidebook. It was just after 12 o’clock when I came there and it was not open, so I went back to a restaurant, Alejo, I had passed by earlier. There was a cheap set menu of the day (comida corriente) for 6000 pesos (July 2008). First I got...

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Santa Fe Transportation

  • From Medellín to Santa Fe de Antioquia...

    Terminal de Norte in Medellín is located 3 km north of the city centre, and it serves the north coast and surrounding towns, including Santa Fe de Antioquia. I only made a day trip so I left the hostel early in the morning. I walked to Poblado metro station and took a metro to Caribe station which is connected to the bus terminal.There is a good...

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  • From Medellín to Santa Fe de Antioquia...

    The buses to Santa Fe de Antioquia leaves from Terminal del Norte. As I was only making a daytrip to Santa Fe de Antioquia I took an early morning bus. The bus left at 7.15 and the ticket was 9000 pesos.After a while we turned to a road where I saw a sign saying “Tunnel closed”. We continued a while and then we came to the closed tunnel, where we...

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Santa Fe Local Customs

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    by mircaskirca Updated Apr 18, 2010

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    When you visit Santa Fe de Antioquia, don't miss tamarindo, the beloved sweet and sour fruit popular in the region, one of the most cultivated by inhabitants and an important source of income. The fruit is longish, 12-15 cm in length, and covered in brown hard interior. It's high in acid, sugar, vitamin B and, interestingly for a fruit, calcium. The wooden stalls on Plaza Mayor are loaded with the fruit, as well cakes, candies and cookies made with tamarind from the surrounding valley. Pick up a pack from one of the vendors or try the tamarind juice that you can get almost everywhere in town.

    With a bit of luck you can also attend the Fiestas de tamarindo (Festival of tamarind) which is held in the mid July. The festival takes place in the centre of the town. It consists of presentations of several folk groups with singing and dancing, orchestras, typical costumes and cuisine. At the end the local community chooses the Queen of tamarind.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals

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Santa Fe Favorites

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    by mircaskirca Updated Apr 18, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Once the capital of the independent state of Antioquia, Santa Fe now is a well preserved colonial town where you can get a good idea of what towns looked like several centuries ago. As you enter Santa Fe, you are immediately brought back in time to an early colonial town with cobble stoned streets, Spanish stucco walls, terracotta roofs and solid wooden doors with ornate carvings. Many houses are white but there are also yellow, red, blue and green houses.

    The historic centre is breathtaking and strolling the old streets gives you the chance to admire the many decorated doorways of the houses, gorgeous patios full of plants and flowers, and typical wooden window guards and balconies. If you give them a closer look you'll find these coloured window guards fine pieces of art. Due to the state of conservation of its colonial architecture, Santa Fe de Antioquia was declared a national monument in 1960.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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